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  #11  
Old 09-13-2009, 07:42 PM
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Default Re: Good looking 200 hp AC motor

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Originally Posted by samborambo View Post
They look like slip ring alternators. They can function like a synchronous motor (eg: PMSM or BLDC) but need a DC current supplied to the brushes to set up the field. You could try simply shorting the brush contacts (the rotor winding) together and running it as an induction motor but I think the rotor impedance would be too high. Do a load test on the motor hooked up to a 208V source with the rotor winding shorted. Be aware that the rotor temperature may increase rapidly with the higher impedance. Worth a try though.

Sam.
Ok thanks Sam!
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  #12  
Old 09-13-2009, 11:32 PM
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Default Re: Good looking 200 hp AC motor

This aircraft generator looks great. I could use this for my motorcycle engine-generator range extender.
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  #13  
Old 09-14-2009, 04:01 AM
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Default Re: Good looking 200 hp AC motor

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Originally Posted by samborambo View Post
Where did you get 460VAC from? The inverter supports 380V-480VAC.
Yeah Sam,

But the motor looks like ACP. Which is the 230 VAC motor. Spec for motor says 400 V, but I think that is the maximum DC voltage input to the inverter, not the AC voltage class. Might be wrong there, just judging from appearance. Academic anyway as I think I saw where these motors are not available for sale.

Regards,

major
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  #14  
Old 09-16-2009, 11:38 AM
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Default Re: Good looking 200 hp AC motor

Just for the fun of it I shot them an e-mail regarding that item and a couple more they have.

There 200hp motor is $20,000
There 40hp 12000rpm motor is $5000, I believe you can add a gearbox 2 it if you wish. They also have water cooled units.
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  #15  
Old 09-16-2009, 01:14 PM
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Default Re: Good looking 200 hp AC motor

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There 200hp motor is $20,000


And there goes our AC opportunity down the toilet...
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  #16  
Old 09-16-2009, 02:30 PM
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Default Re: Good looking 200 hp AC motor

People are proud of there pre WW2 technology!
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  #17  
Old 09-16-2009, 03:46 PM
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Default Re: Good looking 200 hp AC motor

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Originally Posted by CroDriver View Post
This aircraft generator looks great. I could use this for my motorcycle engine-generator range extender.
The one that was to support a Boeing 737 cost me around $700- shipped off eBay.

The 1950's era one with the brushes (NIB) cost me $150- plus shipping of around $100-
The seller who I bought it from a few months ago off Craigslist may have a couple more.

I couldn't pass them up.

Although these are aircraft generator heads and may or may not work as a drive-motor, they were a far cry from $20K+.
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  #18  
Old 09-16-2009, 06:46 PM
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Default Re: Good looking 200 hp AC motor

Quote:
Originally Posted by tj4fa View Post
The one that was to support a Boeing 737 cost me around $700- shipped off eBay.

The 1950's era one with the brushes (NIB) cost me $150- plus shipping of around $100-
The seller who I bought it from a few months ago off Craigslist may have a couple more.

I couldn't pass them up.

Although these are aircraft generator heads and may or may not work as a drive-motor, they were a far cry from $20K+.
I think you got a bargain with the 737 APU alternator. See if you can get hold of the datasheet or details on the APU voltage regulator. I doubt you'll find any motor controller off-the-shelf that will suit this alternator.

Find out the DC voltage/current range for the rotor and use a VSD that is programmed for synchronous motors (BLDC/PMSM). You'll also need a constant current DC PWM regulator to supply the rotor.

Sam.
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  #19  
Old 09-16-2009, 07:18 PM
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Default Re: Good looking 200 hp AC motor

Quote:
Originally Posted by samborambo View Post
I think you got a bargain with the 737 APU alternator. See if you can get hold of the datasheet or details on the APU voltage regulator. I doubt you'll find any motor controller off-the-shelf that will suit this alternator.

Find out the DC voltage/current range for the rotor and use a VSD that is programmed for synchronous motors (BLDC/PMSM). You'll also need a constant current DC PWM regulator to supply the rotor.

Sam.
Thanks Sam

I bought two of these aircraft voltage regulators that might work I bought for a total of $45- off eBay. A friend at work said the Aircraft Ground Power units have basically the same generators and components and I have this schematic for a ground power unit (but it's greek to me ).

He said if I could figure out what pins where what, I might be able to use one.

The simpler the better so I'm open to any option to get this working.







I also bought this thing that looked like it would cross to the same Generator head (another $45-).



Generator head ID plate


Last edited by tj4fa; 09-16-2009 at 07:38 PM. Reason: Added Photo
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  #20  
Old 09-16-2009, 10:32 PM
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Default Re: Good looking 200 hp AC motor

tj4fa,

There's some clues in the bottom left hand corner of the schematic but I can't say for sure. The schematic doesn't show any iron core relationships. Is that dotted box section the motor? It looks like a brushless alternator - no slip rings. F2-F1 is a field winding. G1 three phase winding, the rectifier and the armature coil are all spinning on the rotor. T1, T2, T3 are the stator windings. Are you sure this schematic is for the same alternator? Your alternator definitely has slip rings with brushes (some form of conductive contact with the rotor)? It could be that the alternators are interchangeable. In which case I'd open up the voltage regulator and see what's between pins R and A. We're trying to establish what voltage / current is output across pins R and A.

Another method is to look at the winding copper diameter to get the cross sectional area to work out how much continuous current the field winding is designed for. Usually it's around 7A/mm2. If there's more than one winding wire run in parallel, multiply the CSA accordingly. Measure the winding wire diameter with some digital calipers but be careful not to scratch the insulating varnish off.

Once you've established how much current the winding is designed for, check the DC resistance of the field winding. Multiply this by the current and you'll know the voltage required.

I have a feeling it will be around 300VDC as that's 208VAC rectified. At least that's how I'd design an alternator. In which case you can hook the rotor directly up to the 300V battery pack and treat the alternator as a synchronous motor.
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