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  #161  
Old 06-05-2008, 07:10 AM
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

I'm no motor expert but it looks like it might be a 440 volt AC industrial motor, and not a good choice for an EV. I could be wrong though
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  #162  
Old 06-05-2008, 08:40 AM
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

Quote:
Originally Posted by bucket View Post
Would this make a nice motor for a light conversion ?
My car is a 1975 datsun 100A (weighs 650 kg = 1433 pounds) and for my transportation I would need max 70 km/h (44 miles/h)
Thanks, could get this one really cheap

note: don't think its a forklift motor, don't even know where it comes from ?
Hi bucket,

Yeah, it might. Hard telling how big it is. But the way I read it, 440 volts on the armature and 100 or 200 on the field for 7.5 hp at 2200 rpm. What would you use for a battery? For a controller? Running motors at lower voltage than the nameplate gives you less power. The norm seems to be to run a higher than nameplate voltage. You need to put together a package you can afford and live with. A motor, battery, charger, controller and transmission. Just getting a cheap motor isn't enough. It might break the bank to get the rest of the system to match it.

Regards,

major
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  #163  
Old 06-09-2008, 01:12 PM
TelnetManta TelnetManta is offline
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

I've located, via a local source, a motor that I'm told is purchased frequently to use on EV's. The guy chuckled when I told him what I wanted it for as people apparently call a lot for this reason. He told me that people have bought several motors from Hyster E50XL and E50XM forklifts. He mentioned that they are 8" in diameter and 36V. This voltage sounds very low to me as I want to operate a 120V pack.

Can anyone help demystify this subject for me?

Thanks!

Ben in SC
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  #164  
Old 06-09-2008, 02:55 PM
Dennis Dennis is offline
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

Quote:
've located, via a local source, a motor that I'm told is purchased frequently to use on EV's. The guy chuckled when I told him what I wanted it for as people apparently call a lot for this reason. He told me that people have bought several motors from Hyster E50XL and E50XM forklifts. He mentioned that they are 8" in diameter and 36V. This voltage sounds very low to me as I want to operate a 120V pack.

Can anyone help demystify this subject for me?

Thanks!

Ben in SC
Ben,

Since I assume you live in South Carolina as I do from what I gather with "Ben in SC", then you should go to Belton Metals Inc. They have a scrap yard that has sit down electric forklifts that should have the motors in them. The number to reach their office is (864)-338-7426. The scrap yard is open to the public in case you are wandering....It's the best way to save some money.


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  #165  
Old 06-09-2008, 08:25 PM
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

telnetmanta, forklift motors are very robust,they will take a lot more voltage than what the plate says.you may have to adjust the timing of the brushes but 120 volts is doable for a lot of these types of motors.post on the EVDL and you might get an answer about it from jim husted,i think he visits there more than here.include the motor dimensions and model numbers and maybe link a photo or two.it will help people determine what you have and its possible capabilities.
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  #166  
Old 06-12-2008, 03:19 AM
BigAlum BigAlum is offline
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

Hey, Mr. Husted!

I like your explanations, both here and on your own website. I'm fairly new to this EV thing and brand new to this forum, but I do have some questions that, at this point, only you can answer. 1.) The little yellow "Stinger" motor - How has it performed so far? 2.) Re: White Zombie's Siamese 8" motor has an adjustable brush plate(?) on the front motor. Is it the switching of the brushes from 15 degrees advanced to 0 degrees that reverses direction? 3.) Is this reversing done in conjunction with the rear motor, or does "reverse" drop the rear motor from the circuit? 4.)How does switching from series to parallel mid-run increase RPM and power potential? Hope this isn't too burdensome, but I'm trying to get a better understanding of these ideas in order to put together a very light commuter vehicle in the Myers Motors NmG class or lighter. The Stinger appears to be a 5.5" motor or thereabouts and I happen to have picked up a pair of 24V Advanced D.C. motors from, I believe, an electric pallet jack or a stand-on forklift, that I would like to try to siamese for this project. Without a doubt, one of these would be too small for this vehicle, but perhaps siamesed and series-switched for takeoff and hill-climbing, it could possibly do the work? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. BTW- Both motors have two part numbers on the plate - Part No. 992307 and Part no. 140-32-4001.
Thanks, Alan
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  #167  
Old 06-12-2008, 06:13 AM
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

Unfortunately Jim hasn't been around here in over a month, he's a busy guy, but hopefully he'll pop back in sometime.
One thing I can answer is the brush timing does not reverse the motor, you'd need a reversing contactor to do that.
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  #168  
Old 06-12-2008, 06:58 AM
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

Quote:
Originally Posted by JRP3 View Post
One thing I can answer is the brush timing does not reverse the motor, you'd need a reversing contactor to do that.
Hi JRP3,

Actually you can reverse the motor with brush timing (or position change) by rotating 90 degrees on a 4 pole motor. This is rarely if ever done. I believe that change in timing for reverse is done to eliminate arcing problems and give more torque. Reversing is done with contactors, but then the brush advance in the wrong direction. So, when in reverse, the brushes are rotated back to neutral. I know Jim pretty well. I don't think he'll mind me sticking my nose in here.

Regards,

major
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  #169  
Old 06-12-2008, 07:04 AM
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

I see. I always assumed that with low reverse speeds timing/arcing would not be a problem.
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  #170  
Old 06-12-2008, 07:15 AM
Hi Torque Electric Hi Torque Electric is offline
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

Hey Big A

First of only my Mom get's to call me Mr. Husted (and then only when pissed at me 8^o so call me Jim 8^)

1.) The little yellow "Stinger" motor - How has it performed so far?

That motor got just a couple runs in and did very well but was removed for another project and I've lost touch with where and what it's doing now. I built another motor much like it and it was put on the sister pocket bike Orange Crush and running 24 volts just ran a 10.95 second 1/8th mile "Crushing" the old record of 13.26 8^)

2.) Re: White Zombie's Siamese 8" motor has an adjustable brush plate(?) on the front motor. Is it the switching of the brushes from 15 degrees advanced to 0 degrees that reverses direction?

It's done so the front motor can be timed to the rear motor (electrically they run opposite each other. When reversing, the rear motor is disengaged and just the front motor is used, but it is then running at 15 degrees retarded (maybe advance chalenged is a more politically correct wording By using the adjustable timing it can be set to neutral for reverse and then set back to be timed correctly with it's brother.

3.) Is this reversing done in conjunction with the rear motor, or does "reverse" drop the rear motor from the circuit?

Yep.

4.)How does switching from series to parallel mid-run increase RPM and power potential? Hope this isn't too burdensome, but I'm trying to get a better understanding of these ideas.

Running series produces more torque but you get far less RPM's at X voltage and running them in parallel gets you less torque (but your moving now and don't need it) and much higher RPM's at X voltage.

The Stinger appears to be a 5.5" motor or thereabouts and I happen to have picked up a pair of 24V Advanced D.C. motors from, I believe, an electric pallet jack or a stand-on forklift, that I would like to try to siamese for this project.

The Stinger is a 6.7" Prestolite so a little bigger than what you have, unless you need to re-measure 8^o. If you like throw me some pics and I'll put an eyeball on them for you.

I would like to try to siamese for this project.

Maybe I'm partial to this phrase but it can only be a "Simaese" motor if it's conjoined via the shaft running through both motors 8^P So I'm thinking you'll couple them together?

BTW- Both motors have two part numbers on the plate - Part No. 992307 and Part no. 140-32-4001.

When using twin motors, you need to use the same motor types or one will do most the work while the other is a couch tator which will cause the work horse to over heat and burn up.

Hey JR:
HEY, I was here yesterday 8^) (although I do admit I got busy and deserted my post for a little while) but that said if you guys need my attention, don't be afraid to kick me in a private (no not in the privates 8^) if when needed, to get my attention.

Hope this helps
Jim (not Mr.) Husted
Hi-Torque Electric
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