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  #21  
Old 11-19-2008, 07:37 AM
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Default Re: "Good OHM'n"... here we go...

Just waiting for my coupler to come back from balancing. In the mean time, I will look for a manual steering box today. I'm off to a hockey tournament for 4 days so,.. no progress this weekend. Did some power washing under the hood to get rid of some grease and grime. When I see the pics of car unbodies and frames of trucks from southern USA that look like new.... I'm very envious. Winter road salt takes it's toll up here in Canada, at least in this area. Have to service the Dakota ICE today for before the 7 hour trek to Lake Placid tomorrow am.

Cheers.
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  #22  
Old 11-19-2008, 09:17 AM
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Default Re: "Good OHM'n"... here we go...

Quote:
Originally Posted by DIYguy View Post
Just waiting for my coupler to come back from balancing. In the mean time, I will look for a manual steering box today. I'm off to a hockey tournament for 4 days so,.. no progress this weekend. Did some power washing under the hood to get rid of some grease and grime. When I see the pics of car unbodies and frames of trucks from southern USA that look like new.... I'm very envious. Winter road salt takes it's toll up here in Canada, at least in this area. Have to service the Dakota ICE today for before the 7 hour trek to Lake Placid tomorrow am.

Cheers.
I got a real good warrantied used one from Everdrive.com for my '91 Ranger. It was like new.

And I took and used some Ospho (rust neutralizer) on the surface rust of my frame and then used cold galv spray paint on it. I overcoated it all with bed liner spray but that was a mistake. The bed liner spray paint doesn't like to stick to the zinc coating and has peeled off in some places.

I should have just topped it off with some Rustoleam spray paint.

For more more severe rust, there's a few products Like POR-15 that can be applied over rust to keep it from getting worse.

Last edited by tj4fa; 11-19-2008 at 09:21 AM.
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  #23  
Old 11-19-2008, 11:34 AM
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Default Re: "Good OHM'n"... here we go...

Looking good, DIYguy!

I'm really curious to see how that forklift motor works. I was considering one that I think was identical. Still not decided yet.
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  #24  
Old 11-19-2008, 11:52 AM
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Default Re: "Good OHM'n"... here we go...

Quote:
Originally Posted by tj4fa View Post
I got a real good warrantied used one from Everdrive.com for my '91 Ranger. It was like new.

And I took and used some Ospho (rust neutralizer) on the surface rust of my frame and then used cold galv spray paint on it. I overcoated it all with bed liner spray but that was a mistake. The bed liner spray paint doesn't like to stick to the zinc coating and has peeled off in some places.

I should have just topped it off with some Rustoleam spray paint.

For more more severe rust, there's a few products Like POR-15 that can be applied over rust to keep it from getting worse.
Ya. I haven't dug into the frame issue to much yet. although I did ask and get this tip.... see below....from TX_Dj. I think he did a great job. Check out his pics too.

Originally Posted by DIYguy
Hey TX_Dj,

Just wondering what you used to remove the rust from your frame. Also, what paint did you use? Are you planning to coat the inside of the frame at all?

Your frame was made in the plant that I have worked in for the last 25 years. It is located in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada. It was all welded manually. It originally came with a frame coating called hot-melt-wax. This is a combination of wax and paint mixed. There were variants of this process including a high temp one.

Regards,
Gary

Hey Gary.

That's interesting! I knew it had "something" on it, but not much of the original coating was left. I suspect the kid who owned the truck before me liked to do a lot of off-roading and water-crossing with it, and it appears it got stuck in deep sand for a period of time, partially submerged at least to the frame.

The hot-melt comes off very easily with the degreaser I use, and for a while I thought it was just a dry grease of some sort.

In the spots where corrosion got past the hot-melt stuff, it was just a light surface rust. I used a combination of an abrasive wheel (the stuff that's like a scotch-brite pad on steroids) which basically tears it back to a shine immediately, and a wire wheel. The pics on my site don't really do justice, since I botched the paint the first time around and had to re-strip it... that's when I started using the abrasive pads. Didn't get any pics of it with it super shiny silver, but the paint really doesn't care so long as it has a good surface to "bite".

The paint I'm using is called KBS RustSeal. I recommend it, but it's an isocyanate based urethane. If you spray it you *must* have a positive displacement helmet and a fully sealed "bunny suit". I opted to brush on, so I used a good sealed pair of goggles and a decent respirator, changing the cartridges regularly since the isocyanate is odorless you can't tell when the cartridges are "full" (part of why NIOSH says only use the positive-displacement type). It is incredibly resilient stuff. The only thing that will take it off with momentary incidental contact is methylene chloride. Even brake fluid has a minimal affect on it.

I don't recommend their "KBS BlackTop" chassis coat. This is the stuff that "botched" the paint job the first time. They claim it was because of an error in the factory where it didn't get thinned enough, which may be true- but I didn't like the look of it compared to the semi-gloss RustSeal.

It goes on pretty thick (2-4 mil) but self-levels rapidly. It will sag if too thin for conditions, but have never seen it orange-peel.

I am not coating the inside of the chassis, like I said earlier it was just a mild surface rust, and I'm only going thru the trouble because I want the truck to look like it should for a vehicle with as much invested as I will be investing in the conversion. It looks GREAT, though... it's pretty hard to tell at a glance that it was a brush-on application.

Since the final re-painting, I did glob up all my excess paint on a 1" brush and shove it thru every hole that you can see rust on the inside of the frame, and that has helped it to look a lot better thru the holes.

Anyhow, I'm rambling. Let me know if you have any questions.
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  #25  
Old 11-19-2008, 11:53 AM
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Default Re: "Good OHM'n"... here we go...

Quote:
Originally Posted by david85 View Post
Looking good, DIYguy!

I'm really curious to see how that forklift motor works. I was considering one that I think was identical. Still not decided yet.
Thanks David. I'm curious also! lol. It seems to be the right size and Jim Husted says it should work well. Thats good enough for me!

G
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  #26  
Old 11-26-2008, 06:46 AM
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Default Re: "Good OHM'n"... here we go...

I did a time-temp test to better understand and quantify the temp rise of the motor. I noticed while running the motor that the output shaft was heating up a bit. I think, after going through that exercise, that the results are normal...however I'm no authority on this topic. Details can be seen here....
http://www.diyelectriccar.com/forums...est-24191.html
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  #27  
Old 11-26-2008, 06:53 AM
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Default Re: "Good OHM'n"... here we go...

After returning from my son's hockey tournament (4 days in Lake Placid ) I picked up my coupler from balancing. It cost me $50 cash and most of his time was spend making up the shafting, collar and key etc. for the balance machine and coupler mount. He just ground off material to balance. It was spun up to 4000 RPM and he figures it is within 0.0005" of true centre. There are a few pics of it below shown mounted on the motor. The last one shows one of the screws in the "jacking hole" demonstrating sufficient room to break the coupler apart for removal. There is room in the bearing cavity to start this screw and thread it in.
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  #28  
Old 11-27-2008, 05:31 PM
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Default Re: "Good OHM'n"... here we go...

Yesterday I picked up this manual steering box. I found 3 of them locally. one for $100, one for $75 and one for $50. I bought the one for $75 because it saved me 45 minutes of driving. It is out of a 1996 Ranger. Should work ok, and has the pitman arm on it too. May have to change that, haven't looked yet. Will put it on this W/E if all goes well.

I also came up with a little different idea for my motor to trans spacers. I was working on one method but changed gears (pun intended). I'll take a couple pics tomorrow if I get to it. Still have some drilling/tapping to do.

Cheers.
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  #29  
Old 11-27-2008, 07:29 PM
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Default Re: "Good OHM'n"... here we go...

The really strange thing is that when I was looking online for a powersteering box for my F250 (ranger up to F350 trucks use the same steering gear), I found that the manual steering box was not only rare and hard to find, but bloody expensive too, much more than a powersteering box. Glad you were able to find one so easily. I'm curious to know how many turns there are lock to lock.

We have 3 older ford trucks and all of them are 4 turns lock to lock. All with powersteering.
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  #30  
Old 11-28-2008, 05:30 AM
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Default Re: "Good OHM'n"... here we go...

Quote:
Originally Posted by david85 View Post
The really strange thing is that when I was looking online for a powersteering box for my F250 (ranger up to F350 trucks use the same steering gear), I found that the manual steering box was not only rare and hard to find, but bloody expensive too, much more than a powersteering box. Glad you were able to find one so easily. I'm curious to know how many turns there are lock to lock.

We have 3 older ford trucks and all of them are 4 turns lock to lock. All with powersteering.
I didn't realize the F series used the same box as the Ranger. I heard they were extremely rare on F series, likely due to it's size/weight. They all said that there was no box listed for the Mazda, but only the Ranger. I think the price is set based on availability. You can usually barter with them if you find more than one. I will check the turns ratio and post it if it is of some help.... I can do that without installing it I'm sure.

I offered them my power box and pump...but they weren't interested...
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