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Old 03-26-2011, 03:44 PM
sukusia sukusia is offline
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Default Finding a motor on a budget

So here is what I learned about motors from this site. I wanted to post a quick reference so newbs (like myself) do not have to sort through the sticky page.

When looking for a forklift motor:
Get a series wound motor because they have very high torque and handle abuse (over volting) a lot better.
Know the difference between a Spex motor and a Series wound.
When dealing with series wound forklift motors go for higher voltage. (36V may require advanced timing.)
Hp does not directly represent torque (although it does have a factor in its equation).
Get a class H insulation if possible (makes your motor last longer)
Get a motor around 150lbs (Wouldn't risk a motor that's too light, it won't have the oomph you need. a few extra pounds is A-o.k. but a significant amount of extra pounds limits your range)
Get one with a male shaft
A keyed shaft is easier to work with but you can still work with a spline shaft
Try and get the coupler that goes on to your motor when you buy it/rip it out (saves you $$ and time)
When looking for a different motor:
Ac is not the way to go for your first conversion (or do i just have low expectations of myself?)
You can tell if a motor is AC if it is a 1 phase or 3 phase motor
Pancake motors are usually not good candidates for car conversions. (Yeah you saw the one on ebay. They overheat easily)
Golfcart motors are seldom powerful enough for a conversion
Motors specifically made for EV conversions are the best but its gonna cost you.
You do have to look at many factor such as volts, amps (which gets you Hp). Torque is nice to know. Continuous Hp. So many factors!!!
Quote:
"HP is HP Electric motors and gas engines are rated differently w/r/t HP. And they have different torque curves. But one HP from an electric motor shaft is exactly the same as one HP from a gas engine shaft at the same RPM "- Major
If there is any more helpful hints I'll be happy to add them

Last edited by sukusia; 03-27-2011 at 01:54 PM. Reason: I'm not smart
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  #2  
Old 03-27-2011, 06:01 AM
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major major is offline
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Default Re: Finding a motor on a budget

Quote:
Originally Posted by sukusia View Post
So here is what I learned about motors from this site. I wanted to post a quick reference so newbs (like myself) do not have to sort through the sticky page. Correct me if i'm wrong on these.
Hi suk,

Not bad Here's a couple of comments. Refer back to your #1 post for quote context.

Quote:
(36V usually is too low)
Not necessarily. Many 36V motors work out well for guys on 72 or 96V systems, some even higher. That usually requires advance (shifting the brush position).

Quote:
A heavier one is o.k. but it limits your range
Unless you go way overboard, I doubt you need to worry about a few motor pounds subtracting from your range.

Quote:
Hp from an electric motor is not the same as Hp from an Gasoline engine
HP is HP Electric motors and gas engines are rated differently w/r/t HP. And they have different torque curves. But one HP from an electric motor shaft is exactly the same as one HP from a gas engine shaft at the same RPM

Regards,

major
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Old 03-27-2011, 01:40 PM
sukusia sukusia is offline
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Default Re: Finding a motor on a budget

Thank you for your input major. You are the motor master after all. Doh on my part for the HP thing. I kinda have to laugh at myself for that one. I think I'll change my top post to correct and clarify things for newbs like me.

Thanks
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Old 03-30-2011, 03:55 AM
AC or DC AC or DC is offline
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Default Re: Finding a motor on a budget

A query I have is finding a source for a forklift motor. Other than purchasing a wrecked forklift I have seen information about picking them up from servicing and repair places. However if a motor is being thrown out then surely it is not going to be worth salvaging for using in an electric car conversion. If it won't work in a forklift any more then to me it follows that it is only suitable as scrap. Please any advice gratefully received.
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Old 03-30-2011, 04:19 AM
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Default Re: Finding a motor on a budget

Quote:
Originally Posted by AC or DC View Post
A query I have is finding a source for a forklift motor. Other than purchasing a wrecked forklift I have seen information about picking them up from servicing and repair places. However if a motor is being thrown out then surely it is not going to be worth salvaging for using in an electric car conversion. If it won't work in a forklift any more then to me it follows that it is only suitable as scrap. Please any advice gratefully received.
I have a local motor service place near me and they have quite a few motors 'in stock'.

Often a dead motor is brought in and found uneconomical to repair or the turn over time is too long and so a new or recon motor is sold in exchange. The dead one is then repaired when work is quiet and place on the shelf for sale. Occasionally they have also repaired motors and the customer never returns for it, some are even paid for and abandoned.

So it is worth asking and you should get a rebuilt motor with a warrenty on the work.

However, the other way is to find a fork lift breaker. They will often remove running motors and sell them with no more warrenty then that it spins on 12V. You may then, if is is rough, be taking it back to the repair shop to have it rebuilt anyway. But you could also be lucky and get a really good one that require only a clean and new brushes and bearings.
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Old 03-30-2011, 04:23 AM
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Default Re: Finding a motor on a budget

I am going to make this thread a 'sticky'.

Please post concise useful hints and tips, maybe with helpful images, here to help members and keep the 'is this one any good (with photos)' and the 'chat' about them in the other sticky thread please.

Thank you.
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Old 03-30-2011, 04:27 AM
sukusia sukusia is offline
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Default Re: Finding a motor on a budget

Quote:
Originally Posted by AC or DC View Post
A query I have is finding a source for a forklift motor. Other than purchasing a wrecked forklift I have seen information about picking them up from servicing and repair places. However if a motor is being thrown out then surely it is not going to be worth salvaging for using in an electric car conversion. If it won't work in a forklift any more then to me it follows that it is only suitable as scrap. Please any advice gratefully received.
I bough Ben Nelson's Build your own electric car cheap DvD where Ben gives a brief explanation on how to repair an electric motor. The motor Ben used barley turned and was rusted on the case badly. But he made it run. Its not that expensive from what i saw ($50). Another factor to consider is the price of batteries. These old forklifts may still be running but as they grow older the value of the batteries actually cost more than the forklift itself. So what do these companies do? They scrap the forklift. Why buy new batteries for an old forklift when you can have newer batteries and a new forklift?
Finding one can be difficult in certain areas. I talked to a friend of mine and he said that all the big company's with the forklifts you want send the broken-down/old forklifts to the scrap yard. Most of the time for insurance purposes big companies cannot sell it to someone. So your best bet is either surf the web or call multiple scrap yards and ask them to call you if they ever get a forklift in.

My 2 cents
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Old 04-01-2011, 04:16 AM
AC or DC AC or DC is offline
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Default Re: Finding a motor on a budget

Thanks for those useful comments people. They have given me a few ideas.
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Old 04-13-2011, 10:42 AM
electro37 electro37 is offline
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Default Re: Finding a motor on a budget

Quote:
Originally Posted by sukusia View Post
So here is what I learned about motors from this site. I wanted to post a quick reference so newbs (like myself) do not have to sort through the sticky page.

When looking for a forklift motor:
Get a series wound motor because they have very high torque and handle abuse (over volting) a lot better.
Know the difference between a Spex motor and a Series wound.
When dealing with series wound forklift motors go for higher voltage. (36V may require advanced timing.)
Hp does not directly represent torque (although it does have a factor in its equation).
Get a class H insulation if possible (makes your motor last longer)
Get a motor around 150lbs (Wouldn't risk a motor that's too light, it won't have the oomph you need. a few extra pounds is A-o.k. but a significant amount of extra pounds limits your range)
Get one with a male shaft
A keyed shaft is easier to work with but you can still work with a spline shaft
Try and get the coupler that goes on to your motor when you buy it/rip it out (saves you $$ and time)
When looking for a different motor:
Ac is not the way to go for your first conversion (or do i just have low expectations of myself?)
You can tell if a motor is AC if it is a 1 phase or 3 phase motor
Pancake motors are usually not good candidates for car conversions. (Yeah you saw the one on ebay. They overheat easily)
Golfcart motors are seldom powerful enough for a conversion
Motors specifically made for EV conversions are the best but its gonna cost you.
You do have to look at many factor such as volts, amps (which gets you Hp). Torque is nice to know. Continuous Hp. So many factors!!!
If there is any more helpful hints I'll be happy to add them
Anywhere where the "metric-sytem" is used; there is no use of the word Horse Power, it is a forbidden-word in the Euro-Union, to the extent, if a student doing an exam uses the word ,horse-power he automatically voids his answer!!!!!!!!!!!! Some examiners were willing to fail your whole "paper" in Europe during the "changeover" to metric.
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  #10  
Old 04-13-2011, 12:58 PM
sukusia sukusia is offline
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Default Re: Finding a motor on a budget

Quote:
Originally Posted by electro37 View Post
Anywhere where the "metric-sytem" is used; there is no use of the word Horse Power, it is a forbidden-word in the Euro-Union, to the extent, if a student doing an exam uses the word ,horse-power he automatically voids his answer!!!!!!!!!!!! Some examiners were willing to fail your whole "paper" in Europe during the "changeover" to metric.
Good thing I'm not in Europe then.
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