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  #1601  
Old 04-11-2012, 01:24 PM
franky975 franky975 is offline
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

Wow. Thank you all of your replies. I have seen all of these motors on ebay except the milkfloater motor. My donor would be something from a suzuki swift(geo metro) up to ford focus sized car whatever come up cheap enough in reasonable condition. One of these motors is too big(heavy) for the size of mi (planed) car other one has 80v rated voltage others has 3-8kw output what may not be enough to maintain 50 mph in a such car. I would use it to go to work and back what is a 10 miles round trip and on my way to home i may use highway hence the speed demand (only 3.5 miles). Ocassionaly on weekends would have to do 30 miles on one charge. My plan is 120v lead acid pack so i think a 48v 10kw motor on 120v would do 25kw=34bhp what would be enough to accelerate 2200lb of metal(and me). Does it make sense or i am wrong?

Who sells the linde r14 drive motor has the pump motor available as well. The specs are 48v , 230 amp, 2900 rpm, 90 kilowatt(?). Is it any good or should i go for a bigger one?
Thanks. Franky.

Last edited by franky975; 04-11-2012 at 04:24 PM.
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  #1602  
Old 04-11-2012, 02:07 PM
green caveman green caveman is offline
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

Quote:
Originally Posted by franky975 View Post
My plan is 120v lead acid pack
Off-topic for this thread, but don't buy batteries until the very end of the conversion and when you do, take a very close look at the advantages of Lithium batteries (which, hopefully, by then will have dropped even further in price).

There are many threads on this topic. Short summary. Although Lithiums are a higher initial investment (say twice as much) the general thought is that over the long term they are more cost effective (more charge cycles). They're easier to mount - the physical size is smaller. The lower weight makes for a car that "feels" much better.
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  #1603  
Old 04-11-2012, 09:00 PM
wildcat_1967 wildcat_1967 is offline
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

jrp3, that does indeed look like them.
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  #1604  
Old 04-11-2012, 09:07 PM
wildcat_1967 wildcat_1967 is offline
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

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Originally Posted by JRP3 View Post
yes that looks like them JRP3.
Scott.
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  #1605  
Old 04-12-2012, 01:56 AM
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

Quote:
Originally Posted by franky975 View Post
Wow. Thank you all of your replies. I have seen all of these motors on ebay except the milkfloater motor. My donor would be something from a suzuki swift(geo metro) up to ford focus sized car whatever come up cheap enough in reasonable condition. One of these motors is too big(heavy) for the size of mi (planed) car other one has 80v rated voltage others has 3-8kw output what may not be enough to maintain 50 mph in a such car. I would use it to go to work and back what is a 10 miles round trip and on my way to home i may use highway hence the speed demand (only 3.5 miles). Ocassionaly on weekends would have to do 30 miles on one charge. My plan is 120v lead acid pack so i think a 48v 10kw motor on 120v would do 25kw=34bhp what would be enough to accelerate 2200lb of metal(and me). Does it make sense or i am wrong?

Who sells the linde r14 drive motor has the pump motor available as well. The specs are 48v , 230 amp, 2900 rpm, 90 kilowatt(?). Is it any good or should i go for a bigger one?
Thanks. Franky.
One initial indicator of size would be the physical dimensions of the motor, about 9" diameter would be about the right starting point for your conversion. Much smaller and it won't be powerful enough, much bigger and it will be heavy and not spin fast enough.

The specs on the 48V pump motor you describe sounds good but is more likely 9.0kW. That would be the sort of spec you could look for. Drive motors are better to go for as they have a higher duty cycle rating, usually 1 hour as opposed to pumps which are maybe 5 minutes, at full rated power. Also pump motors tend to have female shafts which are really difficult to use in a conversion.
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  #1606  
Old 04-12-2012, 06:00 AM
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Yabert Yabert is offline
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

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Originally Posted by franky975 View Post
My plan is 120v lead acid pack so i think a 48v 10kw motor on 120v would do 25kw=34bhp what would be enough to accelerate 2200lb of metal(and me). Does it make sense or i am wrong?
Roughly, you are right. 25 Kw is a good amount of power to move a small car. And you can obtain much more power for few sec. during an acceleration.

But the main problem remain. The power of a pump motor is only rated for 5 min... after this time, it will overheat.
Try to find a motor with one hour rated.
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  #1607  
Old 04-12-2012, 03:26 PM
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

Hi All

I am going to convert an MGB. Found them in a barn in Feb. I have an 8" pump motor that was on the forklift I got the 11" motor for the Ranger conversion.

Anyway it is a GE 20% duty 7.4 KW 280 amps. The one with the funny looking extensions on the drive end.

I put it in the car to test different pack voltages. 72,96 and 120 volt.
120 gives plenty of speed. I put a fan to blow air through it . The motor temp has only gotten up to 90 F. so far. I have only driven it a few miles at a time.

The question is to maintain speed the motor draws about 160 amps, bat amps about 80. In the ranger with 11" motor it only takes half the motor amps to do that. Is this a difference because of the motor size or is it just not enough motor.

Thanks Alvin
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  #1608  
Old 04-13-2012, 08:56 AM
Arlo Arlo is offline
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

Whats a rule for max armature rpm for the different dia motors?
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  #1609  
Old 04-20-2012, 11:42 PM
salsmeyer salsmeyer is offline
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

Greetings: This is a wonderful thread! I bought this Allis-Chalmers motor 28 years ago and now ready to convert my '82 S10. I'm planning to use Lithium batteries and keep the weight down where possible (motor weighs 200 plus).
Motor specs:
7HP 180 amps 840 rpm with open perf. covers
4.5HP 120 amps 970 rpm with solid covers
36 volts series wound
serv.factor: 1.0
1 hour duty
deg. C. rise winding: 115
deg. C. rise comm.: 130
Ser.# 7-6328-17266-1-67
57 comm bars (near as I could count)
insulation class: F

The brushes and comm looks good with little wear, inside of motor is clean, I have the gear for the taper shaft. What is a safe voltage? (will fan cool if necessary) What would be a good controller? Is this a good motor for the S10? Any and all advice is welcome.
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  #1610  
Old 04-20-2012, 11:52 PM
salsmeyer salsmeyer is offline
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Default Re: Using a forklift motor, and choosing a good one

I forgot to put the size of the Allis-Chalmers motor: 11.5" dia 16" long
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