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    1. · Registered
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      3,143 Posts
      I watched the video and the motor looks larger than a 1/4 HP, more likely it's 3/4 or 1 HP. Also the number of poles and the type of AC motor are important. A fan motor may be shaded pole, which has very poor starting torque but is fine for fans and is "impedance protected" so that a locked rotor will not cause a major overload. It may be a PSC type, which is permanent split-phase capacitor, and these are good all-purpose motors. Capacitor start motors have even higher starting torque for loads like pumps.

      For tilling, the speed of the blades is probably important, and will be determined by the size of the pulleys and the rated motor speed. If you can provide the nameplate data for the fan motor it will help determine if it is OK, and if you can find out how fast the tiller blades should turn, that will be needed as well.

      The wall switch in the video (which the woman called a "plug") may not be suitable for the motor, but you can get high capacity switches that will do the job. Rather than an E-stop button, I think you will be safer to use a spring-operated handlebar lever switch such as are standard on mowers, so that if you should trip over a rock and fall toward the blades they would at least stop moving before you landed on them.

      Here are some ideas, but you can probably get a switch from almost any power tool with a guarded pushbutton, such as a circular saw or chainsaw, or you might find an old electric mower. A pushbutton would work, but it might be difficult to hold in while tilling, But it should be easy to rig up a handlebar lever like a bicycle brake.

      http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/3832510MG/1091-1007-ND/2747838
      http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/C7001AFBB/1091-1040-ND/2747871

      http://www.automationdirect.com/adc...inated_Pushbuttons_Flush_-a-_Extended/GCX3102
      http://www.automationdirect.com/adc...ated_Pushbuttons_Flush_-a-_Extended/ECX1702-5

      Here is a good 18A motor starting contactor. If you use this, you can use a much smaller switch to control the coil:
      http://www.automationdirect.com/adc...ctors_-z-_Overloads/9_to_25_Amp/SC-E04-110VAC

      You can also get cable-pull-operated safety switches which might work for you. These will handle a motor directly, 30A at 240VAC, although only 6.5A 120V breaking rating. But that's 1 HP at 120 VAC.
      http://www.automationdirect.com/adc...witches/Cable-Pull_Safety_Switches/SDM2K96X11
       
    2. · Registered
      Joined
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      7 Posts
      Discussion Starter · #7 ·
      I watched the video and the motor looks larger than a 1/4 HP, more likely it's 3/4 or 1 HP. Also the number of poles and the type of AC motor are important. A fan motor may be shaded pole, which has very poor starting torque but is fine for fans and is "impedance protected" so that a locked rotor will not cause a major overload. It may be a PSC type, which is permanent split-phase capacitor, and these are good all-purpose motors. Capacitor start motors have even higher starting torque for loads like pumps.

      For tilling, the speed of the blades is probably important, and will be determined by the size of the pulleys and the rated motor speed. If you can provide the nameplate data for the fan motor it will help determine if it is OK, and if you can find out how fast the tiller blades should turn, that will be needed as well.

      The wall switch in the video (which the woman called a "plug") may not be suitable for the motor, but you can get high capacity switches that will do the job. Rather than an E-stop button, I think you will be safer to use a spring-operated handlebar lever switch such as are standard on mowers, so that if you should trip over a rock and fall toward the blades they would at least stop moving before you landed on them.

      Here are some ideas, but you can probably get a switch from almost any power tool with a guarded pushbutton, such as a circular saw or chainsaw, or you might find an old electric mower. A pushbutton would work, but it might be difficult to hold in while tilling, But it should be easy to rig up a handlebar lever like a bicycle brake.

      http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/3832510MG/1091-1007-ND/2747838
      http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/C7001AFBB/1091-1040-ND/2747871

      http://www.automationdirect.com/adc...inated_Pushbuttons_Flush_-a-_Extended/GCX3102
      http://www.automationdirect.com/adc...ated_Pushbuttons_Flush_-a-_Extended/ECX1702-5

      Here is a good 18A motor starting contactor. If you use this, you can use a much smaller switch to control the coil:
      http://www.automationdirect.com/adc...ctors_-z-_Overloads/9_to_25_Amp/SC-E04-110VAC

      You can also get cable-pull-operated safety switches which might work for you. These will handle a motor directly, 30A at 240VAC, although only 6.5A 120V breaking rating. But that's 1 HP at 120 VAC.
      http://www.automationdirect.com/adc...witches/Cable-Pull_Safety_Switches/SDM2K96X11
      Yeah I'm not a big fan of the wall switch, I'd rather have something a little more finished looking/operating than that. The nameplate data for the attic fan motor is on the wiring diagram in the first post. As for the rotation speed of the tines or pulley's on the tiller...that's anyone's guess lol.

      Here is a pic of the motor:



      As for ON/OFF operation I was thinking of a selector switch like the one below. I also liked the orange since it kind of went with the original paint job:

      http://www.galco.com/buy/Idec/HW1F-2F10QD-A-120V

      Naturally if a 10A switch is not large enough another will have to be selected. FYI it was wired in my house on a 120V, 15A tandem circuit breaker (assuming single pole). Any suggestions on amperage rating I should look for in an ON/OFF switch? Maybe 15A would be sufficient?

      The tiller also has a clutch to engage the tines so I'm not terribly worried about it riding off into the sunset. You can see it here on the left handle:

       

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