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    1. · Registered
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      33 Posts
      Discussion Starter · #5 ·
      Let me give you guys an example.

      http://www.evwest.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=8&products_id=300

      This motor says it can do
      Rated Torque: 560 Lb Ft Peak (w/150kW controller)
      Rated Power: 420 HP Peak (w/150kW controller)

      It also mentions it can spin to 10,000 rpm.

      It also says that it is 180lbs, 10.5" in diameter, and 18.5 inches end to end.

      The TR6070 for the corvette is 21" end to end, and at least 10.5" in diameter. It weights 153 lbs dry.

      So why not just fab up a mount for the above electric motor where the tranny sits, and fab up some sort of custom drive shaft/coupler to hook it up to the rear end?

      Are there batteries I could stuff into the engine compartment/forward of the transmission in the tunnel?

      Why do I need the transmission?
       
    2. · Registered
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      8,498 Posts
      Let me give you guys an example.

      http://www.evwest.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=8&products_id=300

      This motor says it can do
      Rated Torque: 560 Lb Ft Peak (w/150kW controller)
      Rated Power: 420 HP Peak (w/150kW controller)

      It also mentions it can spin to 10,000 rpm.
      ...
      So why not just fab up a mount for the above electric motor where the tranny sits, and fab up some sort of custom drive shaft/coupler to hook it up to the rear end?
      Because that 10,000 rpm motor would only be turning a couple thousand RPM at highway speed, with just the final drive reduction. It needs another stage of reduction gearing... although an extreme final drive ratio would help and might be enough.

      As far as performance is concerned, it would be like driving with the engine and with the transmission in 5th gear all of the time.
       
    1. · Registered
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      8,498 Posts
      Dual (siamese) motors that are mechanically linked (and thus act more or less like one motor) are fairly common.
      Yes, but even then when they are AC they still use two inverters/controllers.

      Examples:
      • HPEVs AC-3Xx2
        Although the two motors are build on the same shaft and in the same housing, the wiring diagrams show one motor connected to a primary controller and the other connected to a secondary controller (using Curtis 12xx controllers).
      • AM Racing AMR Dual Stack 250-90 AC Motor
        "Requires dual controllers for operation."
       

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