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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I'm studying the opportunity to install an electric engine into a 20-meters sailboat. The required nominal power is 100kw, with 150kw peak.
I think I've almost resolved the design of the propulsive part (384V batteries, 200kw AC motor with a M-Force DC5000 or a Tritium WaveSculptor 200 controller), but I now need some tips for the generator part.

In normal use, this sailboat should run 100% electric (it should use the propeller only for leaving/entering the harbor), but it may sometimes have to run longer without sailing (no wind / too much wind). So it needs a diesel generator (1 x 100kw or 2 x 50kw... this second option is preferred) to provide electricity to the propeller's engine for long trips.

For amenagement reasons, the diesel engine can't be directly connected to the propeller (like for a "classic" diesel installation), and will be in boat's stern.

I'm stuck finding an alternator/controller fitting my needs (384V / 130A DC on a 3000-rpm diesel engine). Does anyone has a link to such product ?

Thanks
 

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Any 230V 50kW 3 phase industrial motor should do that, you'll need a regen capable inverter too of course.

Why don't you call ABB, Baldor or any of the other motor/inverter manufacturers and talk to their application engineers.

Alternatively use the motor inverter parts selected for propulsion for generation as well.
 

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Thanks for your answer. I though it could exist cheaper solutions than using a regen capable inverter used in regen-only mode.

I'll soon contact the inverter manufacturers, but I would like to have an idea of the price of a such system.

A DC -> AC inverter without regen is often cheaper than one with regen. I think than a AC -> DC converter should be even cheaper. I'm just surprised that it's hard to find product references on Internet.
 

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Hi. I would use a diesel genset, a diode bridge with a couple of caps to get a DC bus voltage. Then contact the Evnetics guys for help in using their Soliton-1 DC controller as a charger. Alternatively, with some programming skills and a PC working off the Soliton logs, you can build a charger in software. You set your controller to command charging current as needed and turn it off when it reaches the desired voltage (or time).

In a pinch, you can bypass the "charger" (and batteries) and put that DC bus directly to the driving controller.

JR
 

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Thanks for your answer. I though it could exist cheaper solutions than using a regen capable inverter used in regen-only mode.

I'll soon contact the inverter manufacturers, but I would like to have an idea of the price of a such system.

A DC -> AC inverter without regen is often cheaper than one with regen. I think than a AC -> DC converter should be even cheaper. I'm just surprised that it's hard to find product references on Internet.
Perhaps, there really is no difference between a regen capable inverter and a non regen capable inverter, except software. That wouldn't stop them from charging more for it however.

You could use a DC generator to charge the battery directly, regulating the output with the throttle or the field current. I suspect the motor manufacturers can again point you to a solution if they still make this sort of thing.

Or an AC generator/motor with a dumb rectifier.

There are many ways to skin this cat. The nice thing with an inverter is that you can program it for easy control of the charging current and voltage.


What is your budget? I hear twenty meter sailboat and i think laaaarge budget but I might be wrong.
 

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Hi. I would use a diesel genset, a diode bridge with a couple of caps to get a DC bus voltage. Then contact the Evnetics guys for help in using their Soliton-1 DC controller as a charger. Alternatively, with some programming skills and a PC working off the Soliton logs, you can build a charger in software. You set your controller to command charging current as needed and turn it off when it reaches the desired voltage (or time).

In a pinch, you can bypass the "charger" (and batteries) and put that DC bus directly to the driving controller.

JR
Would have to be some big caps for 100kW power holdup at 60Hz genset output... Also, you will need a huge inductor after the Soliton to store the power. Why don't just wire 2 contactors and switch main motor controller power source from battery to rectified diesel genset DC bus? Might still need the caps though - in one of the other threads when I was toying with a similar idea, Tesseract mentioned that motor controllers are not designed to run off the pulsed DC source...

V
 
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