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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a compressor that is supposed to run on 110v and 220v with a simple switch of wires. The motor is a Century. Attached is the spec plate. Also attached are the instructions for making the switch to 220v for that motor. Also attached is what I see when I removed the cover. I don't see the colors indicated in the instructions. I bought this new many years ago and always ran it on 110v. Need to switch to 220.
Font Number Document
Blue Font Gas Plant Electric blue
Automotive tire Product Motor vehicle Electrical wiring Steering wheel
Blue Font Gas Plant Electric blue
Automotive tire Product Motor vehicle Electrical wiring Steering wheel
Anyone have any thoughts?
 

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Can't tell much from the pictures, but one recommendation would be given you know what it's wired for currently, try to map that to the instructions, and then deduce the changes from that.

P.S. Are you a real person, not a bot ? :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
LOL Yes I'm real. I've been running it on 110 for years. My new location, running it on 110v draws a lot and after a while blows the breaker. I just had a dedicated 220v outlet installed and am lost trying to reconfigure the wires to 220v
 

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LOL Yes I'm real. I've been running it on 110 for years. My new location, running it on 110v draws a lot and after a while blows the breaker. I just had a dedicated 220v outlet installed and am lost trying to reconfigure the wires to 220v
Just an odd discussion board for this question. Seems like there should be fabrication-oriented boards where people service air compressors quite often.

Yes, I understand the problem. So like I said - knowing that it's currently wired for 115 , try to map out the wires to the instructions. So for example, your Brown motor wire is currently on terminal #5, but you need it on terminal #3. Even if you can't decode the color of the wire, knowing where it goes tells you which one it is.
 

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I wouldn't map anything on that abomination. Looks like they used a three conductor cord, snipped off a conductor, and wire nutted the frame ground (green) and neutral in the motor.

Your 230V cord should have red and black wires as L1 and L2 and a Green ground wire. Which is why you're scratching your head on the line connections.

You'll need to strip back the cord (not recommended) or buy a new one. You're playing with fire (230 is deadly) not using the ground correctly on a metal cased machine. That includes the next person correctly identifying the wire.
 

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Your 230V cord should have red and black wires as L1 and L2 and a Green ground wire. Which is why you're scratching your head on the line connections.
3 wire cable with BWG color-coding is a lot more common, which is why it's frequently used by DIYers in wiring 230v equipment. Nobody died from that yet. The other part of it is that the windings of the motor need to be rewired - for 230v they're in series, and in 115v configuration they're in parallel - I think that's the main confusing part to the OP.
 

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3 wire cable with BWG color-coding is a lot more common, which is why it's frequently used by DIYers in wiring 230v equipment. Nobody died from that yet.
You missed everything I posted.

Where is green in the cord going into that motor?

Why is the frame tied to neutral with the wire nut like you suggested? Map that to 230V? I hope not...that makes the frame 115V hot with respect to earth on a split phase 230V.

Yes, people die from improperly grounded metal-cased outdoor/garage/pool equipment all the time. A guy in Thailand got electrocuted beating on a pump with a plumbing wrench - it was all fun and games until he broke through the paint.

People can die if they have no clue how to rewire a machine to higher voltage operation and who map neutral to L1 or L2 with a wire nut tying L1 or L2 to the machine's metal frame. Without a clearly designated ground wire and proper grounding at the plug and motor end of that designated ground wire, no rookie should attempt a rewire (not that they should, anyway). Other wiring faults can only result in smoke after that.

Kids touch stuff, if your next argument is Darwin at work.

First step - buy a new cord and grounded plug.
 

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You missed everything I posted.

Where is green in the cord going into that motor?

Why is the frame tied to neutral with the wire nut like you suggested? Map that to 230V? I hope not...that makes the frame 115V hot with respect to earth on a split phase 230V.

Yes, people die from improperly grounded metal-cased outdoor/garage/pool equipment all the time. A guy in Thailand got electrocuted beating on a pump with a plumbing wrench - it was all fun and games until he broke through the paint.

People can die if they have no clue how to rewire a machine to higher voltage operation and who map neutral to L1 or L2 with a wire nut tying L1 or L2 to the machine's metal frame. Without a clearly designated ground wire and proper grounding at the plug and motor end of that designated ground wire, no rookie should attempt a rewire (not that they should, anyway). Other wiring faults can only result in smoke after that.

Kids touch stuff, if your next argument is Darwin at work.

First step - buy a new cord and grounded plug.
Yes, you caught a detail I didn't notice (because I didn't look too hard). Certainly if he sends a hot from 240 to the frame that will be quite fun.
 
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