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I can see that you seem to have a great knowledge in EV conversion there, and you got me intrigued: Would you like to share the link to your projects with me so I can have a look at your own stuff too?
Electric cars are just the latest variation of my area of personal interest, which is vehicles in general; it's also an overlap with my technical background. Being curious, I have looked into the mechanical and electrical power solutions in many different EVs and plans for conversions... but I haven't converted even one myself.

I started in this forum because I need to replace the engine in our Triumph Spitfire, and was considering an EV conversion (rather than just an engine rebuild or swap, which I've done with other vehicles). I learned a lot about the options... enough to decide not to do it! Seriously, there are some good Spitfire conversions in this forum, but there are also lots of reasons not to do this, at least for my situation. I do have a plan for the Spitfire (with a Chevrolet Spark EV motor), but it is unlikely to be executed at this point, for various reasons.

People come into EV conversion with many different backgrounds, from being able to build electronics and program embedded computer systems but having no idea how anything in a car works, to being able to rebuild an entire car but having no idea about concepts such as current, voltage, power, and energy. Some are very knowledgeable in a single brand or type of hardware but seem unaware of alternatives. I think an important function of the forum is to help fill in the blank areas.

For me, these conversion planning discussions are a great opportunity to learn something new. For instance, I was familiar with the general layout of the early rear-engine Renaults, but I didn't know about the truly bizarre choice of rear suspension (the swing tubes or "trumpet castings" as very narrow-based arms) until I looked at it more closely for this thread.
 

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ok I thought someone said it was

must be the r4 as you said


have any info on how to raise the suspension/torsion bars on r4/5?


I looked in some books and they show bolts under the seat inside the car
and some flanges to put vise grips on but cant see any of that on my lectric lepord/R5






thx
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
hello brian_

Your story is very impressive. I think I've never met anybody in an online forum just going around helping other people, with over 3'000 posts and no project on his own. Hats off to you sir!

I have quite a collection of different Renault vehicles, from 1924 to today! So eventually I might be able to introduce a few of my other cars too - and having said that I can include the picture of another car of mine today in answer to the question of member @swo regarding the torsion bars. Brian is of course right that the 4CV and R4 have nothing (or, let's say, not much) to do with each other. They are a few years apart, in between them there's even another car: The Dauphine.

Here's a direct comparison. This is my 1976 Renault 4:



and this is the car I am currently converting as per this thread:



Regarding the torsion bars I will need to check the workshop manual. I might even have the one of the R5 somewhere in my office. As soon as I'll get something I will let you know @swo!

Best regards,
Remi.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
...and then I nearly forgot to also give some feedback to @Eddie49 on the non-splined end of the input shaft: As you guessed, there is a pilot bearing/bushing on the crankshaft side holding the whole lengtht (about 30mm) of the non-splined part of the input shaft. Here you can see it:



In my understanding I will need to include some sort of a similar bearing/bushing on a coupler between the motor output shaft and the flywheel in order to support the input shaft. Do you agree?

Best regards,
Remi.
 

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... As you guessed, there is a pilot bearing/bushing on the crankshaft side holding the whole lengtht (about 30mm) of the non-splined part of the input shaft.
...
In my understanding I will need to include some sort of a similar bearing/bushing on a coupler between the motor output shaft and the flywheel in order to support the input shaft. Do you agree?
Yes, with a clutch on the input shaft that support should definitely be provided.

Thanks for the photo, which is a reminder of how small this car is... the crankshaft flange and main bearing housing look like something sized for a lawn tractor, rather than a car. :D The principles are all the same, though, including that the flywheel bolts onto the flange as with any typical car.

Usually the centre of the crank flange includes a boss so that the face of the pilot bearing is closer to the clutch than the bolting face. In this case, it is actually a bit recessed, which may explain why the end of the input shaft is unusually long... to reach the pilot bore. It doesn't look like there's a (needle) bearing in there, so I assume that it just has a bronze bushing.
 

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R4/5 suspension sidetrack

I have quite a collection of different Renault vehicles, from 1924 to today! So eventually I might be able to introduce a few of my other cars too - and having said that I can include the picture of another car of mine today in answer to the question of member @swo regarding the torsion bars. Brian is of course right that the 4CV and R4 have nothing (or, let's say, not much) to do with each other. They are a few years apart, in between them there's even another car: The Dauphine.
The naming can be misleading, which is what tripped up swo. The 4CV (like the better-known 2CV and a bunch of larger cars I had never heard of) is from Renault's era of naming by nominal horsepower; the Renault 4 is from a later era of numerically-named models which started in 1961 (oddly, apparently with the "3").

Mechanically, the 4CV is one of the rear-engine cars, and the 4 and 5 are the later front-engine style. The design differences go far beyond the engine placement, so there will be little if anything in common. The 4 and 5, on the other hand, are similar to each other.

Regarding the torsion bars I will need to check the workshop manual. I might even have the one of the R5 somewhere in my office.
I think the Renault 5 is fascinating, because of the unusual engine placement for a front-wheel-drive vehicle (behind the front axle and transaxle), the novel rear suspension configuration (one side is ahead of the other, to allow for long lateral torsion bars), and the car is the basis for the awesome mid-engine R5 Turbo. But I've never worked on one. I thought I might find the front torsion bar adjustment in a quick web search; I didn't find anything clear, but it looks like it might be necessary to push the bars out of their splined sockets and re-insert them after rotation by a spline tooth or two to change height. Too bad if that's the case - I was expecting something like my 1985 Honda CRX, with adjustable bolts on the levers at the bar anchors.
 

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I hope not the guy said it was lowered with just a wrench
So hope easy to raise up a few inches

The lectic lepord was imported to american car company.?
As a glider or electic car has volt batteries in it and small motor
It the one low to the ground
The other one is a convert with kodiak controller and 10-11” motor
Had yellow tops in it putting lg pacifica batteries into it
Now
Trying to figuar out a bms for it
Never had one befor
 

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swo, would you be willing to start a separate thread about the R5? There's some interesting discussion there, but it's really not related to Remi's 4CV. I'll keep some notes about the issues that you've raised.
 

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Yea be great to have le car/ r5/ lectric leopard
Thread going
Not sure how to do that
Thank you
If you are using the regular web browser view of the forum, go to the All EV Conversions and Builds section, click the Forum Tools dropdown, and then click on Post a New Thread.

There will be something similar in the mobile view.

An administrator or moderator could also move the relevant posts from this thread to a new one, but there's no need to ask for that and it's always a bit difficult to decide which posts should move.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 · (Edited)
Hello friends,

I thought it's time for a little update, just realised now that I completely forgot to keep this log here up to date. So let's go with a few developments:

Here you can see the FIMEA-motor and the flywheel/clutch-assembly in front of the car:

 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
On the next picture here you can see the machined flywheel coupler, mounted on the motor output shaft:



If you go further up in the posts you can see the original coupler from the old engine - so the new one looks pretty OK. Also, I machined a hole into the centre of the motor output shaft and put in a bronce bushing, just in the way it was on the original coupler. This is the pilot bushing, taking in the shaft from the gearbox.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
So let's have a look at the other side, the gearbox side. As you know by now, the car doesn't have a clutch bell housing. So as you can see from the drawings further above I decided to machine two adapter plates, connected with a round metal tube to create the missing clutch bell housing. This is the adapter plate on the gearbox side:



As you can see, the adapter plate is bolted directly onto the gearbox cover, and I had to machine a groove for the control arm of the clutch release bearing, which you can see in the middle.

So this is the whole newly developed clutch bell housing finished:



On the near side you can see the gearbox cover, so from that hole the gearbox splined shaft will go into the the new transfer box, and on the far side the motor will be attached. Stay tuned to see!
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
And then it was time for a dry test, if everything fits together.

The gearbox there is actually not the one from my Renault 4CV, as it was already in the car, but a nearly identical one from a later Renault 4. Some parts were used for quite a long time within the Renault model family!



Again, on the near side the gearbox, then the transfer box (clutch bell housing), and on the far side the FIMEA motor. You can also see the protruding control arm for the clutch on the right side (and on top of the gearbox the stick for the gearbox lever of a Renault 4, some of you might remember that the lever would protrude from the dashboard of the Renault 4 in a very typical way, this was due to the fact that Renault decided to just turn the gearbox around for their FWD models so the gearbox position resulted well in front of the front axle, so the control lever needed to go horizontally all the way over the engine to the very front of the car. On my earlier 4CV, the engine is in the back and the gearstick in a traditional way on the floor, so the gearbox is slightly different to the one shown here).
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
And then the moment for an actual assembly in the car came. The assembly is a two-step-process: First the adapter plate and cover plate have to be mounted on the gearbox side which already sits in the car, then the round tube will go on top of that, and finally the motor/flywheel/clutch assembly has to be slid onto to the gearbox shaft. As I don't have an engine jack I used the forklift to carry out that last step:

 
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