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Greetings !!!
I am new to this so please let me know if I am doing anything out of the ordinary.

I picked up a 1965 ford econoline van and I would like to turn it into a company car for my business to take to trade shows and make the odd delivery locally.

I do have some home mechanic experience. I am use to changing my oil, brakes and giving my vehicles tune-ups ( although I have not done this in a long time because its a bit tougher to work on these newer vehicles ) I have also rebulit 2 67 mustangs with my uncle. So I am not affraid of the work, I just need to know where to start, what motors switches to get etc

If anyone can help me out that would be fantastic !!
 

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The gist of it you know. Gut it of engine and exhaust stuff. Then you're going to get a motor, throw it in, get a controller, put it in, find somewhere to put the batteries, get a charger, add some extra components, and then finalize it all.

There's a half-dozen ways of doing each.

Usually what happens at this point is people underestimate the cost, or overdemand performance, and then we don't see them against after a short chat. Which is fine, that's a learning process.

To get started:

Budget?

Range?

Performance needs?
 

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Conversion of this style of van - front engine and forward control - provides a potential opportunity to create a van with a flat floor without an engine doghouse in the front (as it had currently) or a step up for an engine cover in the rear (as with the original VWs and the Corvair).

I think your biggest challenge will be fitting in all of the required components, especially if you eliminate the doghouse. But to figure that out you need to know what you're packing in, and to figure that out it would help to know what you're trying to achieve...
Performance: how quick does it need to be, which determines how much motor power it needs?
Range: what range to you need, which determines how much energy the battery needs to hold?

Of course, the budget is a constraint, which might eliminate some component choices that would otherwise be suitable.
 
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