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Hello everyone I'm super excited to join this forum. I have been building custom Jeeps and AMC's for years now, mainly doing LS swaps. But I finally have found my first "customer" that has the needed budget to do an EV swap. The car we are doing this in is a 1966 Mustang 6 cylinder 3 speed manual. I am super excited about this because for years I have seen EV's being the fast coming future and wanted to learn as much as I could about it. So here is my plan so far and some questions for those that are willing to help! Thanks!

I would love to do a Tesla drive unit, mainly so I can claim that this is a Tesla conversion, but there is no room for the drive unit in the back of this thing and it would require a custom IRS setup, so I was considering pulling the motor out of the drive unit and adapting it to the manual transmission? Not sure if this is possible. If this is not possible I will use a Curtis 1238e-7621 HPEVS Dual AC-34 Brushless Motor and mate it to the Ford manual transmission (probably switch the 3 speed out to a 4 speed with Hurst shifter for nostalgia's sake). I will be replacing the stock 7.25" Ford rear axle with a Ford 8" to handle the increased torque from the electric motor.

The only real question I have on motors like these listed above is what is better for voltage? Higher voltage more efficient? More torque? I will be using LG LI-Ion battery packs, which are ~60 volt battery packs. I have a good source on these batteries but if I'm suggested to stay away I will listen. Luckily in the Mustang I have plenty of room to rack and store battery packs.

Luckily there are no accessory driven items in this car that were originally driven off the motor, no power steering, no power brakes, no AC etc. But I will be adding some of these electronically. I have ordered E-assist power steering, a full vacuum power brake 4 wheel disc conversion kit with an electric vacuum pump, but I am still at a loss of how to get AC (not that the customer has asked about it, but it may come up). Also I figured electric heat is common to find for these EV conversions but I haven't looked into it yet.

I think with all the options I've listed above I will have a pretty good performing EV Mustang that will go and stop well and will still have a first gear that we can throw it in to do some crazy burn outs!
 

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I would love to do a Tesla drive unit, mainly so I can claim that this is a Tesla conversion, but there is no room for the drive unit in the back of this thing and it would require a custom IRS setup, so I was considering pulling the motor out of the drive unit and adapting it to the manual transmission? Not sure if this is possible. If this is not possible I will use a Curtis 1238e-7621 HPEVS Dual AC-34 Brushless Motor...
The case of the Tesla Model S/X motor is integrated with the case of the gearbox, so the motor and gearbox do not easily separate. It could be done, but essentially no one does it.

There is a middle ground between a Tesla motor and those low-voltage industrial vehicle / conversion motors: the Nissan Leaf motor, for instance, does readily separate from its gearbox, and there are high-voltage motors intended for EV use and available aftermarket (such as the HVH series from BorgWarner/Cascadia and the YASA motors).
 

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I will be using LG LI-Ion battery packs, which are ~60 volt battery packs. I have a good source on these batteries but if I'm suggested to stay away I will listen. Luckily in the Mustang I have plenty of room to rack and store battery packs.
My only suggestion would be to call these units "modules", since that's the industry standard terminology: cells are assembled into modules, and modules into packs (in a common housing), and one or more packs make up the vehicle's one battery. These LG modules (assuming that you are talking about ones sold by EV West and others) seem to be from the Chrysler Pacifica plug-in hybrid.
 
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