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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm considering doing a Ev conversion on my 1966 Vauxhall viva. I don't really understand what a lot of what I'm looking at/ for when I'm looking at parts. I'd really appreciate some help. I think I managed to work out what parts I might need (listed below)

.the motor is a motenergy me1114

.the controller is a sevcon gen 4 controller,
size 4 48v (this might be the wrong model I'm not sure)
I have also found a wiring harness for this controller and motor combo Harness for Sevcon Gen4 Series Controllers with Motenergy Motors - Electric Drive Engineering

.For batterys i think I can use Winston Battery WB-LYP40AHA WB-LYP40AHA 3.2V 40Ah ( I think I would have to use 30 cells) but I don't really know if they would even work Winston Battery WB-LYP40AHA WB-LYP40AHA 3.2V 40Ah

.For a DC DC converter i would use a sevcon

Again I don't know much about electronics so if I missed some stuff I will need or some of the parts I think will work don't could someone tell me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's a very low-powered motor to drive a car. How did you choose this motor?
I saw it in a kit on eBay, and thought I could get it cheaper. Do you have any recommendations for a more powerful motor? The car dose only weigh 700 kg's with the original engine.
 

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I saw it in a kit on eBay, and thought I could get it cheaper. Do you have any recommendations for a more powerful motor? The car dose only weigh 700 kg's with the original engine.
What are you goals? Do you want to drive at highway speeds? Do you want to be able to get out of your own way? That motor is 10kw, or about 13 horsepower. The original engine for that car made 33kw, 44hp. You probably want an electric motor that makes similar power to the original engine, but probably more so that you can keep up with modern traffic.

You need to at least get a basic grasp of EVs and understand voltage and amperage and how they relate to eachother and to an electric motor. If you are just finding a cheap motor on ebay with no care about the power it makes or voltage it uses, you are going to have a bad time.

Yes, that motor will work and the 48 volt controller will make it spin, however at only 48 volts that motor will struggle to make the rated 10kw output. Probably 5kw.

Also the batteries you chose if you get 30 of them wired in series will be 96 volts which will certainly fry your 48 volt controller.

Lastly, the DC-DC converter you chose has a maximum input of 48 or 72 volts so your 96 volt battery will likely destroy it.

Or you can parallel your cells to have 48v and the car might be able to do 25mph.
 

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Those cells can be configured in various parallel and series combinations to match the desired voltage, but whatever the configuration they will only hold about 4 kWh of energy. That's either extremely short range, or very low speed, or some combination of the two.

30 cells * 3.2 V * 40 Ah/cell = 3,840 Wh

30S1P: 40 Ah @ 96 V
15S2P: 80 Ah @ 48 V
10S3P: 120 Ah @ 32 V
etc

For comparison, a typical plug-in hybrid car has four times that energy capacity and only goes 80 km (50 miles) or less on it; even with a car half the weight of a typical modern compact car, that suggests a range of about 40 km (25 miles).
 
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