DIY Electric Car Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been contemplating converting my 1981 Ford Fairmont wagon to an EV, off and on for about a year now. It took me 9 years to find one than wasn't rusted out or wrecked bad. I had originally planned to make it a 5.0 V8 5 speed car; a sleeper hotrod. I have it on jack stands in the garage right now.

I would like for this car to be my daily driver for work. It is 19.9 miles to work, so a 40 to 50 mile range would be needed. About half of the route is shallow hills on local roads with the speed limit 40 or 45 mph. About 6 miles are on the interstate at 70 mph. The other part is 25 or 35 mph in town.

I figure a DC motor conversion with a 144 VDC supply would provide a decent amount of power and distance at a cheaper cost than an AC conversion and be simpler too.

I plan on it being a 5 speed manual transmission car. I have a 2.26:1 open geared rear and a 3.73:1 limited slip geared rear. Do I need the lower geared rear, or is it a waste of energy, since the electric motors have their max torque at start? Is a limited slip a waste in an electric car? It will have manual disc brakes on all 4 corners, with manual rack & pinion steering.

I have built a few hotrods to include their engines, and tranmissions. I have plenty of tools and a garage to work in. I understand electronic theory and have built a few projects to include audio amplifiers, bass contour networks, passive and active crossovers, power supplies, computers, voltage regulators, converters, etc.

I would appreciate input, advice and recommendations. I have never done an ICE to EV conversion, but am excited about the possibilities. I have also considered converting my 1970 Falcon wagon too, but figure it would be too heavy to be an efficient candidate. Thank you.

Darrell R. Miller
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
a sleeper hotrod
A sleeper for sure but a hotrod? Bout put me to sleep looking at what one looks like. Sorry but are you truly sure you want to convert that? :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Most people don't know the 1979 thru 1993 Mustang was built on the Fox chassis. The Fox chassis is a 1978 Ford Fairmont. All of the readily available HiPo Mustang parts bolt on. This is the reason I have subframe connectors, tubular upper and lower rear control arms, disc brake 3.73 8.8 rear, tubular front K-member, tubular lower control arms, coil over strut conversion, manual disc brakes, tilt column, manual rack & pinion steering, bump steering conversion, driveshaft loop, etc. The Fairmonts are lighter than their Mustang counterparts, by 250 to 650 pounds, according to options. It is a lightweight & strong chassis with a wide range of parts availability. I know it's a square box, but it also has plenty of room for batteries and components too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
I've been contemplating converting my 1981 Ford Fairmont wagon to an EV, off and on for about a year now. It took me 9 years to find one than wasn't rusted out or wrecked bad. I had originally planned to make it a 5.0 V8 5 speed car; a sleeper hotrod. I have it on jack stands in the garage right now.

I would like for this car to be my daily driver for work. It is 19.9 miles to work, so a 40 to 50 mile range would be needed. About half of the route is shallow hills on local roads with the speed limit 40 or 45 mph. About 6 miles are on the interstate at 70 mph. The other part is 25 or 35 mph in town.

Thank you.

Darrell R. Miller
Actually, 1978-83 EV Ford Fairmont Wagons were factory converted when new. They still come up for sale. See:

http://www.evalbum.com/2298

Russ Kaufmann

RUSSCO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
Yes Russ you are right- we stripped a few of parts years ago. The main problem with them was they had a 120 volt system with a GE 11" 120 volt motor at @ 1800 rpm, so the top speed through the automatic transmission was about 45 MPH.
The pictures to the link shows the original battery boxes, rubber coated steel...
Mike
www.EV-propulsion.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
So, does anyone have any suggestions about rear gear ratio? Do I really need the 3.73 gears, or would 2.26 gears be more in line since the electric motors have max torque at start? Is a limited slip differential a waste in an electric car? I plan on a T-5 manual transmission. Thank you.

Darrell
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
I would leave the gears as is- you can always use a higher gear if you feel the need to raise the final/total ratio. A lot of ev'ers start in second gear. Always good to have a low gear ratio available for when you want to tow a boat with that wagon! As far as limited slip, if you are in a low traction situation it might come in handy just as it would in an ICE.
mike
www.EV-propulsion.com
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top