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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Donor Vehicle:
Jeep Wrangler 2000 Manual Transmission
Gross vehicle weight - 4450

Skills:
Mechanical - Proficient
Electrical - Basics
Fabrication - Basics

Range:
Start - 50 Mile Range
End - as much as I can possibly fit and afford in the long run.

Performance:
At least get same as a comparable v6 Jeep - 190 bhp
Max speed: 80mph

Creature Comforts
Heating-Must
AC - not required

Budget
$10k not including donor vehicle

Parts considered
NetGain HyPer9 AC Motor
HPEVS AC-?? (need some suggestions on which one to get)

Timeline
I don't have a garage and this is my daily driver, so I will need to work over summer as I live in Colorado and I can only ride my scooter during summer while I work on this project.
 

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Performance:
At least get same as a comparable v6 Jeep - 190 bhp
Max speed: 80mph
...
Parts considered
NetGain HyPer9 AC Motor
HPEVS AC-?? (need some suggestions on which one to get)
I don't see how either of those motors can possibly provide performance comparable to the original - they simply don't have enough power output.

Also, that generation of Wrangler (TJ) didn't come with a V6 engine. This one presumably has the 4.0L inline-6; the good thing about that is that engine is heavy, allowing more mass of motor and battery before reaching the original weight.

Budget
$10k not including donor vehicle

Parts considered
NetGain HyPer9 AC Motor
HPEVS AC-?? (need some suggestions on which one to get)
I suspect that with motors like this, the motor and controller will consume half of the budget, and miscellaneous mechanical and electric parts too much of the rest, leaving not enough for the battery... but it can still work, assuming a salvaged battery will be used with the new motor.

Timeline
I don't have a garage and this is my daily driver, so I will need to work over summer as I live in Colorado and I can only ride my scooter during summer while I work on this project.
That's a challenge - conversions often take years. This situation would encourage keeping the vehicle as mechanically stock as possible (e.g. retaining the original 4WD system and possibly transmission), but from your motor possibilities it seems that you are leaning in this direction anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't see how either of those motors can possibly provide performance comparable to the original - they simply don't have enough power output.

Also, that generation of Wrangler (TJ) didn't come with a V6 engine. This one presumably has the 4.0L inline-6; the good thing about that is that engine is heavy, allowing more mass of motor and battery before reaching the original weight.


I suspect that with motors like this, the motor and controller will consume half of the budget, and miscellaneous mechanical and electric parts too much of the rest, leaving not enough for the battery... but it can still work, assuming a salvaged battery will be used with the new motor.
What motor would you recommend for a vehicle this size?

Yes, I'm thinking about using salvaged batteries from Nissan Leafs (Tesla's are still too expensive)

That's a challenge - conversions often take years. This situation would encourage keeping the vehicle as mechanically stock as possible (e.g. retaining the original 4WD system and possibly transmission), but from your motor possibilities it seems that you are leaning in this direction anyway.
I was thinking about keeping pretty much everything stock except for the engine. I found an accessory Plate & Pump System For HPEVS from EV west that could do the trick with keeping the rest of the components pretty much intact. (really pricey though)


I have also found that in Colorado I'm eligible for up to $4K for the conversion as long as I finish it before 2021, so that extends my budget by another $4k
 

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I was thinking about keeping pretty much everything stock except for the engine. I found an accessory Plate & Pump System For HPEVS from EV west that could do the trick with keeping the rest of the components pretty much intact. (really pricey though)
I note in EV West's description:
You can drive the vehicle without idling because everything comes on after about 5 mph. For parking situations and and running the air conditioning while not moving you will need to setup some kind of idle system.
There are reasons that almost no one takes this approach. Have you tried turning the steering wheel with no boost?

This setup would be more effective it it were attached to a fixed-speed accessory motor, instead of to the main motor, but that would put cost up even more.
 

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What motor would you recommend for a vehicle this size?
There are a lot of aspects to appropriate motor selection, most of which are highly dependent on the individual situation... but for enough power to replace the stock engine, something salvaged from a production EV (the Leaf is the most popular) seems like a better match than anything new that would fit the budget. If you win a lottery, a BorgWarner HVH motor would be nice...
 

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I have also found that in Colorado I'm eligible for up to $4K for the conversion as long as I finish it before 2021, so that extends my budget by another $4k
That's an interesting program, but I would be cautious about qualifying. It appears that they expect the person claiming the credit to buy the conversion (as a service, or by buying a converted vehicle); it is not at all clear to me in a quick reading that a do-it-yourself conversion would be straightforward to document and claim.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I note in EV West's description:

There are reasons that almost no one takes this approach. Have you tried turning the steering wheel with no boost?

This setup would be more effective it it were attached to a fixed-speed accessory motor, instead of to the main motor, but that would put cost up even more.
Thanks for the honest opinion. Steering is a little difficult with such big tires especially when the car is not moving so I would like to keep power steering and Heat. So maybe I could just get an electric pump for steering.

AC won't be needed, I had the Jeep for two years and I haven't event used it once.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
There are a lot of aspects to appropriate motor selection, most of which are highly dependent on the individual situation... but for enough power to replace the stock engine, something salvaged from a production EV (the Leaf is the most popular) seems like a better match than anything new that would fit the budget. If you win a lottery, a BorgWarner HVH motor would be nice...
I'm surprised a nissan leafs might have more power than the motors available from evwest.
What got me thinking about his project was this emvcon jeep project

Do you recognize what engine they are using in the picture attached?



 

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Discussion Starter #9
That's an interesting program, but I would be cautious about qualifying. It appears that they expect the person claiming the credit to buy the conversion (as a service, or by buying a converted vehicle); it is not at all clear to me in a quick reading that a do-it-yourself conversion would be straightforward to document and claim.
I will do more research on it, but from what I gathered all I have to do is fill a form, keep receipts, and register the vehicle in colorado as an ev in 2020. But if it applies I'm sure more people in CO might take advantage of this tax credit.
 

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I'm surprised a nissan leafs might have more power than the motors available from evwest.
The motors from HEPEVS and NetGain (the suppliers of the motors listed earlier) are intended for low-speed industrial vehicles - essentially load carriers like heavy-duty golf carts and equipment such as forklift trucks. They don't need much power compared to a car.

The Leaf motor was quite conservatively designed. The rated power appears to be set by the capabilities of the battery and the controller. As those other components have been upgraded, what appears to be the same motor has gone from 80 kW, to 110 kW, and now 150 kW. Other modern EVs of the same type (compact to mid-sized cars) tend to be in the same power range.

What got me thinking about his project was this emvcon jeep project

Do you recognize what engine they are using in the picture attached?
The JK Wrangler in the August 2015 image appears to have an HPEVS motor in it (with the blue case that they commonly use); the transmission is not visible.

The photos in the "SEMA 2016 Jeep" section show a much larger (longer) motor, with a reduction gearbox instead of the original transmission. It might be another HPEVS unit. It appears to be one of the double motor packages, which is effectively two motors mounted end-to-end on one shaft; these are particularly expensive to use because they require two controllers/inverters.

Since the EMVcon site appears to be dedicated to self-promotion with minimum information, I didn't take the time to watch their videos, which might be more informative (or even less informative).

Do you recognize what engine they are using in the picture attached?



The images don't display for me, due to access limitations to the content from the Google service (the public is not permitted to view them).
 

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It will be tough to complete this over the summer, but certainly doable to get something driving. The trickiest bit will be adapting the motor to the transmission...There is likely no off-the-shelf adapter, which means you'd need to have one made that doesn't vibrate at a few thousand RPM.

I'm a sucker for buying a whole Leaf and using as much as possible. It seems like the cheapest way in. You'll still need a controller, charge controller, BMS, charger, and probably a DC-DC converter (though you might scrape by with a big 12v battery). I'm not sure how the Leaf heater operates (does it need CAN bus messages?), but that would be something to consider as well. It could be done with $10k depending on what the Leaf costs, but it's not definite. If you can hack the CAN protocol and get the Nissan components to work, you could save thousands.

Consider the situation where you do not succeed and need a car to drive come Fall...You might find yourself trying to sell two parts cars.
 

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https://www.evbmw.com/index.php/evbmw-webshop/nissan-built-and-tested-boards

Damian Mcguire has super cheap logic boards. This vehicle control unit would give you full control of your leaf motor. There is a land rover defender that uses this motor I saw somewhere on here. The video makes it look like a fine choice for a jeep. I bought a tesla motor and Damians logic board. Found the tesla motor for 1600 on ebay somehow. lol then Damians Logic board is only 456 bucks right now. Hoping to figure this out. Think I will just set all my settings really low and use most of my stock components till I am ready to upgrade to one tons. Gonna go slow to start out and just upgrade what breaks one part at a time. So tired of buying gas when I want to go skiing or biking. I lived in Colorado and had the real deal but never really used it as much as I wanted because of Gas prices. Kinda just deciding to put all my gas money into batteries now. Feels pretty good. Wish I took electrical engineering when I was in college sometimes. But this website is way more addicting and the people on here are really helpful.
 
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