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Discussion Starter #1
I have purchased a 2kWh section of a Chevy Volt battery to upgrade El Moto, my electric motorcycle conversion from SLA's.

I want to double check a few things before hooking it up & using it
(with everything being so messed up, here on the forum, I can't do much research myself)

First, the BMS plug (the end that plugs into the battery itself)

It has (18) slots (for wires) & (17) wires
(I did some checking with my m-meter)

With the plug, plugged in (looking at the back side) & the retainer clip away from me

I numbered them, top row is #1 thru #9 & the bottom row is #10 thru #18

It looks like
#1 has no voltage reading
#2 is (-) negative
#3 is 7.7V
#4 is 15.3V
#5 is 23V
#6 is 30.6V
#7 is 38.3V
#8 is 45.9V
#10 has no voltage reading
#11 is 3.8V
#12 is 11.4V
#13 is 19.6V
#14 is not used
#15 is 26.7V
#16 is 34.4V
#17 is 43.1V
#18 has no voltage reading

All of this sound right?
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
I want to connect a couple of digital volt monitor/meters (~$3.00 ea.)
...to monitor the balance of my "new" Volt battery
(going digital, NO idiot lights)

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Mini-DC-5-120V-3-Digital-LED-Voltage-Voltmeter-Panel-12V-36V-48V-72V-Car-Battery/122117143903?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&var=421674045396&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649

Their real simple, just (2) wires a positive (+) & a negative (-)
...& draw their power (<23mA) right from the voltage source


So, to hook up the left 1/2 pack voltage monitor

I would connect
The negative (-) lead (black wire) coming from the meter
...to the BMS pin #2 negative (-) (black wire with a purple stripe)

The positive (+) lead (red wire) coming from the meter
...to BMS pin #5 (23V) (green wire)


To hook up the right 1/2 pack voltage monitor

I would connect
The negative (-) lead (black wire) coming from the meter
...to the BMS pin # 5 (23V) (green wire)

The positive (+) lead (red wire) coming from the meter
...to BMS pin # 8 (45.9V) (dark gray wire)
 

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See my post of awhile back for answers to your questions: https://www.diyelectriccar.com/forums/showthread.php/cell-tester-chevrolet-volt-battery-197441.html

I am still riding the learning curve on the Chevrolet Volt battery - but find that the Tester, as described, helps a lot and makes checking the condition of the battery easy. One thing that I think is important is that the cells are very well balanced at all charge values. This appears to confirm the opinions of others that a BMS is unnecessary for a Volt battery. I have no BMS, and have been charging the battery with one of the DROK Converters mentioned elsewhere in the Forum. That unit works well, but charges at a low rate (around 2 Amps) - so takes 10-12 hours. I recently picked up a 48 Volt 25 Amp Float Charger that had been used on a microwave system. It was intended for lead acid batteries, but features precise voltage control and built-in metering. I believe that it will work just fine for charging my Li-Ion Volt battery. I will find out soon (maybe
tomorrow) and will report my findings.

More later, Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #4
See my post of awhile back for answers to your questions: https://www.diyelectriccar.com/forums/showthread.php/cell-tester-chevrolet-volt-battery-197441.html

I am still riding the learning curve on the Chevrolet Volt battery - but find that the Tester, as described, helps a lot and makes checking the condition of the battery easy. One thing that I think is important is that the cells are very well balanced at all charge values. This appears to confirm the opinions of others that a BMS is unnecessary for a Volt battery. I have no BMS, and have been charging the battery with one of the DROK Converters mentioned elsewhere in the Forum. That unit works well, but charges at a low rate (around 2 Amps) - so takes 10-12 hours. I recently picked up a 48 Volt 25 Amp Float Charger that had been used on a microwave system. It was intended for lead acid batteries, but features precise voltage control and built-in metering. I believe that it will work just fine for charging my Li-Ion Volt battery. I will find out soon (maybe
tomorrow) and will report my findings.

More later, Dave

Hello Dave
Thanks for the link, I wish I could see/read it.
...but, it's one of the blocked/inaccessible threads

I have read other threads that discuss/cover the Volt BMS plug
...but, I cannot access them either
 

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Well I tried out the Float Charger - and can say that the operation was a success - but the patient died. First I set the float voltage where I wanted it, then connected the battery and started charging. The Voltage started at the Battery level and built up slowly, while the current went right to the supply limit (25 Amps) and stayed there. The Volts built up to the set value in about half an hour - and kept going up. Not wanting to damage the battery, I switched the unit to Standby for awhile - then switched back to Run. At that point the supply failed - giving me an alarm (light). I thought it might reset with a rest period, so tried that. No dice. Likewise overnight. I opened it up and looked for damage but found none. There is a 25 Amp Slow Blow fuse inside - but it is not blown.
Unfortunately, I have been able to find no info on the unit online, so doubt that I will be able to fix it. Too bad, because it is a really high quality unit (made for continuous commercial service - never turned off) There is no AC power switch. At least the price was right - I got it for free.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #6
See my post of awhile back for answers to your questions: https://www.diyelectriccar.com/forums/showthread.php/cell-tester-chevrolet-volt-battery-197441.html

I am still riding the learning curve on the Chevrolet Volt battery - but find that the Tester, as described, helps a lot and makes checking the condition of the battery easy. One thing that I think is important is that the cells are very well balanced at all charge values. This appears to confirm the opinions of others that a BMS is unnecessary for a Volt battery. I have no BMS, and have been charging the battery with one of the DROK Converters mentioned elsewhere in the Forum. That unit works well, but charges at a low rate (around 2 Amps) - so takes 10-12 hours. I recently picked up a 48 Volt 25 Amp Float Charger that had been used on a microwave system. It was intended for lead acid batteries, but features precise voltage control and built-in metering. I believe that it will work just fine for charging my Li-Ion Volt battery. I will find out soon (maybe
tomorrow) and will report my findings.

More later, Dave
Hare are pics of the Chevy Volt BMS plug wiring, that I was looking for (explained)
Thanks Dave,
 

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