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I'm currently working on designing an '82 Corvette high performance conversion, and have found the specs I want using 3 AMR racing 250-90 motors. This isn't ideal, because I would need to do a conversion on the front axis, but what is the general consensus on the best configuration for 3 motors of equal power in an electric car: is it 2 in the front and one in the back, as they have on some Tesla models, or would 2 in the back and 1 in the front be better because the motors are equal: unlike in the Tesla.

Also, I'd really appreciate some guidance as to the extent one would need to modify the front suspension assembly of a car, specifically an 82 corvette, to fit either 1 or 2 motors, when the original front axle is unpowered. I know I'd need to change the wheel hubs, certain parts of the suspension, and the axle, but would this be a "yeah, just buy these parts and bolt them on", or is it "you are going to need to cut off the front of your car"?

Thanks!
 

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I'm currently working on designing an '82 Corvette high performance conversion, and have found the specs I want using 3 AMR racing 250-90 motors. This isn't ideal, because I would need to do a conversion on the front axis, but what is the general consensus on the best configuration for 3 motors of equal power in an electric car: is it 2 in the front and one in the back, as they have on some Tesla models, or would 2 in the back and 1 in the front be better because the motors are equal: unlike in the Tesla.
Absolutely two in the back, because while accelerating load shifts from the front axle to the rear axle, so at the rear is where the traction is. In a Tesla Model S Performance Dual Motor, the larger motor is in the rear and the smaller motor is in the front.

There is no existing Tesla model with three motors. If the proposed Tesla Model S Plaid variant has the dual motors at the front, then like existing cars with two motors at the front (so that different torque can be applied to each front wheel) the front motors will be much smaller than the rear motor. There are no real specs available for the Model S Plaid, but if the model is eventually built there will presumably be specs showing the motor power distribution. In the graphic in the Tesla website, it appears that switching between Dual Motor and Tri Motor (Plaid) changes between one and two motors at the rear (to the right in the image), not the front.
 

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Also, I'd really appreciate some guidance as to the extent one would need to modify the front suspension assembly of a car, specifically an 82 corvette, to fit either 1 or 2 motors, when the original front axle is unpowered. I know I'd need to change the wheel hubs, certain parts of the suspension, and the axle, but would this be a "yeah, just buy these parts and bolt them on", or is it "you are going to need to cut off the front of your car"?
While the easiest approach might be to cut off the front of the frame with suspension and replace it with the frame (or a custom frame section) and complete suspension, it might be possible to replace the hub carriers and hubs of the original C3 front suspension... if the axle shafts don't run into the frame rails. The only thing that's certain is that it won't be a straightforward bolt-on process.
 
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