DIY Electric Car Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I want to convert a 4 wheel drive van into an electric vehicle - I am tossing up the ides of have NO GEAR BOX - my plan or dream to accomplish this is to put 2 HyPer 9 motors under the bottom of the van as per my drawing


I am daunted by the math so would hope that overkill would take the place of skill but that would really be risky as I expect to spend around $50,000.00

its early days in the planning stages and I do plan to be sure as I can that this is not a terrible idea before I start -

alternative I could perhaps use 2 TransWarp 9 DC Motors but I doubt the top speed would be anywhere near 55 miles an hour and DC seems to be a backward step.

I am open to criticism well thought out or otherwise

https://1drv.ms/u/s!AmbWDB9AS-tJgvZOX7pBar2Kg7NfRA
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
What type of Van and if you need to do any 4x4 off roading your will need a low range , The Bollinger B1 has a 2 speed reduction on each motor .

Use the lowest diff ratios you possibly can. I have 4.75 final drive in my LandRover plus 2.35 in the transfer case

and here we go , your gunna want gears if you go wheeling

https://youtu.be/Scv2z6u-S0w
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
was thinking of using a 1998 Toyota Hiace- never been 4 wheeling myself

I will try to find out if there are any aftermarket Dif for this van.

That Bolinger is an inspiration
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,779 Posts
I can't tell where you are, but if you're in North America parts specifically for a HiAce will be a challenge (since it was never sold here). Fortunately, the axles will not be unique to the HiAce, and will be shared with other Toyota models, presumably including pickups or Land Cruisers. If you know the axle series, you can find lots of information about available ratios from the world of Toyota enthusiasts.

Here's a quickly-found start, which looks promising:
Toyota Hi-ace Axle information
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,779 Posts
I want to convert a 4 wheel drive van into an electric vehicle - I am tossing up the ides of have NO GEAR BOX - my plan or dream to accomplish this is to put 2 HyPer 9 motors under the bottom of the van as per my drawing...
I understand the logic, but as already suggested getting the desired overall speed ratio from motor to wheels will be a key challenge. Certainly with no multi-speed transmission it would work best with a high-voltage AC motor, to get the widest possible range of motor operating speeds - a brushed DC motor is a poor match to this requirement. Unfortunately, if you pick a motor that can produce its max power from 3,000 to 10,000 rpm (typical for a modern EV motor), the reduction gearing in the axle alone will be insufficient. The Hyper9 is a better speed match, but the relatively low-voltage design (which was a deliberate feature of this motor) limits the usable speed range.

One detail: the stock transfer case normally places the shaft to the rear roughly on the vehicle centreline, and the shaft to the front offset to one side and starting not much further forward. It may be more practical to place the two motors side-by-side (rather than end-to-end as you show) so that their outputs reasonably closely match the stock transfer case output locations.

It appears that at least some years of the HiAce have an independent front suspension. If that is the case, then the front motor doesn't need to be back near the middle of the vehicle - it can be coupled more directly to the front differential input (since the differential doesn't go up and down with the suspension, so jointed shaft length isn't required to accommodate movement), as long as there is space under the floor for the motor.

This general configuration of motors driving axles without another gearbox has been discussed several times in this forum. I do not recall anyone going ahead and building a 4WD vehicle this way, although RWD vehicles have been done (just the back half of your plan).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I did some calculations - the 3 litre Diesel motor is specified as - 67 KW with
138 foot pound at 2400 RPM - I have no idea how much torque is put out at lower RPMS ?

number of rev per 1000 meters (tyre reves) 487

Say dif ratio is 3.7 revs of motor per K 1802 per minute = 60K per hour so to go 100KPH I need 1.66X1802rpm = 3000 RPM to go 100KPH (62 MPH)

(138*foot pounds) gross of torque at 2400*rpm

1st gear = 4 to 1 torque going to transfer case 552 FP (138X4)
with diesel engine in 1st gear

HyPer9 rated tourque = 173 FP X 2 motors 346 FP

4th gear 1 to 1 torque going to transfer case 138 FP (1X138)
with diesel engine in 4th gear

HyPer9 rated tourque = 173 FP X 2 motors 346 FP
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
The HiAce was predominatly a 2WD van with IFS , I presume you would be retrofitting a live Axle up front .

I'd be going lower on the diff ratios , 4.875 is a Hiace / Hilux ratio, would be more suitable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,779 Posts
The HiAce was predominatly a 2WD van with IFS , I presume you would be retrofitting a live Axle up front .
Although live beam axles are popular in the off-road community, if the van is IFS to start, and an independently suspended front drive axle is available (as salvage from a HiAce or swap from another compatible Toyota, but preferably by buying a 4WD HiAce), staying IFS seems more straightforward (as well as better in any road situation) to me.

How is the vehicle to be used? Would you be modifying the suspension for more wheel travel and ground clearance, or replacing differentials to get LSD or lockers?

If you convert the front suspension type, then by the time you're done there will be nothing left of the original vehicle's mechanical design or components except the rear axle and the brake master cylinder. Are you up to building a complete custom vehicle chassis?
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top