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Good morning to everyone, I have came searching for answers to a question that I’ve had since the massive surge in electric cars in recent history. My question is in regards to converting a conventional 4x4 3/4 ton truck into a sort of “hybrid” for a lack of better words. My idea is to drop the transfer case from the mechanical drivetrain and have only the back wheels driven by the engine itself. Then, in place of the transfer case, place an electric motor to drive the front wheels. With that said it would act as a AWD drivetrain with the electric motor aiding in lessening the load on the engine thus, in theory, reducing fuel consumption and increasing MPG. I realize there would have to be component upgrades and whatnot along with programming done but that all aside; is the core concept of going this possible with the intended results?


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Once I finish my LandRover EV project I am contemplating converting my 4x4 Iveco 55S17W to "Hybrid"

The configuration of this vehicle is ideal for doing so . Leave ICE turbo diesel in its original position .

Connect Electric Drive to PTO on Transfer Case . Then you can disconnect ICE by putting 6 speed main gearbox in Neutral & driving the wheels via Transfer case , Its Fuil time 4x4 , Or you could select either or both , Transfer case has 4 speeds + Neutral . You could also drive (A/C) Electric motor with Diesel engine whilst stationary to charge batteries.

You would not need starter motor on ICE as you could start with Electric Traction motor .


A fellow owner has one fitted with "Telma Retarder " to help with braking , This is the opposite of a motor & uses battery energy to create a magnetic field to provide braking power , But instead just use an A/C motor for Regen braking , Kill 2 birds with one stone .

see my page here about Iveco brake problems, there is a video at the bottom of page showing the Retarder in use , you will get the idea , the PTO shaft is at the top of the transfer case. Just replace retarder with Motor , job done.

http://www.goingbush.com/iveco5.html
 

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My question is in regards to converting a conventional 4x4 3/4 ton truck into a sort of “hybrid” for a lack of better words. My idea is to drop the transfer case from the mechanical drivetrain and have only the back wheels driven by the engine itself. Then, in place of the transfer case, place an electric motor to drive the front wheels. With that said it would act as a AWD drivetrain...
Where would the energy for the electric motor come from? Are you talking about a battery which only gets charged when you plug in while parked, or is there to be a generator connected to the engine which wasn't mentioned?

Driving one axle with the engine and the other only electrically is a workable idea (if the rest of the details are handled appropriately): Toyota/Lexus hybrid SUVs (RAV4, Highlander, RX, NX) work this way, with the rear axle drive electric-only. Of course, they have a source of electrical power, from the same design of powertrain as used in their 2WD hybrids.

... it would act as a AWD drivetrain with the electric motor aiding in lessening the load on the engine thus, in theory, reducing fuel consumption and increasing MPG.
Although the miles per gallon would increase, this doesn't mean that efficiency is increased. As with any plug-in hybrid, if you load up the vehicle with both fuel and battery charge, then use both of them while driving, the miles travelled per gallon burned does not reflect the whole energy usage.
 

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Where would the energy for the electric motor come from? Are you talking about a battery which only gets charged when you plug in while parked, or is there to be a generator connected to the engine which wasn't mentioned?



Driving one axle with the engine and the other only electrically is a workable idea (if the rest of the details are handled appropriately): Toyota/Lexus hybrid SUVs (RAV4, Highlander, RX, NX) work this way, with the rear axle drive electric-only. Of course, they have a source of electrical power, from the same design of powertrain as used in their 2WD hybrids.





Although the miles per gallon would increase, this doesn't mean that efficiency is increased. As with any plug-in hybrid, if you load up the vehicle with both fuel and battery charge, then use both of them while driving, the miles travelled per gallon burned does not reflect the whole energy usage.


Yes, a battery of some sort would be the source of power to the electric motor and plug-in/ regenerative braking system would be the means of charging the pack. To be fully honest though the last half of your response in regards to the efficiency effectiveness I’m not fully grasping due in part I’m new to this world hints the question asking.


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A fellow owner has one fitted with "Telma Retarder " to help with braking , This is the opposite of a motor & uses battery energy to create a magnetic field to provide braking power , But instead just use an A/C motor for Regen braking...
A generator is the opposite of a motor. A retarder like this is an electromagnetic equivalent to a friction brake: it just turns mechanical energy into heat. I agree that anywhere a retarder is used, a hybrid could regeneratively brake instead... and that could be a good thing for crawling down grades in some off-road situations.
 

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I toyed with the idea of having an electric motor added to the PTO of my Land Rover Series, but the gear ratio is 1:1, meaning the electric motor wouldn’t have sufficient torque for getting underway . :(
 
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