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Discussion Starter · #101 ·
Hi Boekel,
Didn't realise I hadn't replied to your post..
That YouTube clip is amazing!
I'll still protect my motor from moisture, but I feel alot better about it now.
here's a bit more:
http://boekel.nu/foto/10/2010-11sloep/index10.htm


http://boekel.nu/foto/11/2011-03sloep/index2.htm

Great project Boekel! The idea of an electric boat is as exciting as an electric car...
I had no problem viewing the pictures ( using Google chrome on android).
Tell us about your two motors.
Are they AC or DC?
What voltage & current do you run them on?
What power do they put out?
rpm's?
 

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... Renault puts a 3-phase AC synchronous motor in the Zoe and Kangoo Z.E., but it has a powered rotor winding (instead of permanent magnets), using brushes and slip rings. Still no commutator.
Apparently, according to a comment buried in an article about Volkswagen's coming MEB platform, the Audi e-tron package uses a synchronous AC motor with an externally excited rotor winding as well, and so will vehicles built on the MEB platform (in AWD variants).
Volkswagen details the foundation for 10 million electric vehicles (see the Two different kinds of motors section)
 

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I am sure this has been answered somewhere, but I cannot find it so here goes in hope.
For an average mid size compact 4 door car, is a surplus industrial 3 phase motor suitable for an EV?
If so what sort of size and power rating would be considered as good.

So far I have seen 3HP, 5HP and 10HP advertised would any of these be considered suitable?

regards John
 

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Discussion Starter · #105 ·
I am sure this has been answered somewhere, but I cannot find it so here goes in hope.
For an average mid size compact 4 door car, is a surplus industrial 3 phase motor suitable for an EV?
If so what sort of size and power rating would be considered as good.

So far I have seen 3HP, 5HP and 10HP advertised would any of these be considered suitable?

regards John
Hi John,
I'm relatively new to the world of EVs, but here's what I've gleaned. To keep a car moving at a constant velocity, you need to overcome two main opposing forces -
Rolling resistance and air resistance (or drag) . Drag is particularly important at higher velocities, since it increases exponentially with speed.
Still, for a small relatively aerodynamic car like a Toyota Corolla, the power required to overcome those two forces at 65mph is only about 20hp.
Acceleration however, is a completely different kettle of fish. You may need 3x or even 4x the 20hp to get decent acceleration.
I assume the motors you are speaking of are 3 phase AC. I don't think you can safely increase their power output by simply increasing the voltage you run them on.
However, you can safely "over volt" a series wound DC motor. Hence the popularity of DC series wound motors with EV enthusiasts. Used forklift motors
are ideal candidates because they are usually DC series wound, they are cheap and they are easy to find.
Hope this helps,
Greg.
 

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Hi John,
I'm relatively new to the world of EVs, but here's what I've gleaned. To keep a car moving at a constant velocity, you need to overcome two main opposing forces -
Rolling resistance and air resistance (or drag) . Drag is particularly important at higher velocities, since it increases exponentially with speed.
Still, for a small relatively aerodynamic car like a Toyota Corolla, the power required to overcome those two forces at 65mph is only about 20hp.
Acceleration however, is a completely different kettle of fish. You may need 3x or even 4x the 20hp to get decent acceleration.
I assume the motors you are speaking of are 3 phase AC. I don't think you can safely increase their power output by simply increasing the voltage you run them on.
However, you can safely "over volt" a series wound DC motor. Hence the popularity of DC series wound motors with EV enthusiasts. Used forklift motors
are ideal candidates because they are usually DC series wound, they are cheap and they are easy to find.
Hope this helps,
Greg.
Thanks Greg,
that settles that idea. I will go back DC and look for a Forklift one, do you happen to know if a Hydraulic pump/Motor from a forklift would be any good.
I believe my milk float motor is failing under high current and blowing the electrics.
John
 

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do you happen to know if a Hydraulic pump/Motor from a forklift would be any good.
Probably not. It'd be okay for motorbike size and weight.

Two issues:

1 - Pump motors are usually only designed for lower duty cycles, so they lack cooling fans.

2 - They're undersized by at least 50%, if not 66% compared to what you need. You need the traction motor from the lift.

There's a whole gigantic stickied thread on repurposing treadmill motors.
 
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