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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Greetings All,

I've been trying to get my head around installing an electric A/C compressor on my older car. Of course the primary challenge is producing enough electric power to run the thing and of course being able to activate the compressor with simpler switches etc..
Any technical help is greatly appreciated!

Thank you in advance!
 

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Any technical help is greatly appreciated!
Both Damien and Jeff are planning to use the Tesla compressor in their builds... so if you can generate the required HV you should have the required technical info soon :cool:

That said, a lower voltage compressor would be a lot easier I suspect... EVTV have one that runs on 144V nominal (here) and is fully documented.
 

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Both Damien and Jeff are planning to use the Tesla compressor in their builds... so if you can generate the required HV you should have the required technical info soon :cool:

That said, a lower voltage compressor would be a lot easier I suspect... EVTV have one that runs on 144V nominal (here) and is fully documented.
I have two Tesla AC compressors. The 2015 version is CAN driven and may not be decipherable. The 2014 version is PWM controlled. Still unknown is the specifics of the PWM signal - but likely to be much easier to hack.

I should open up the control side of the 2015 compressor just to see if there is a Tesla control board inside - so there's a chance Damien can work his magic on it.

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Both Damien and Jeff are planning to use the Tesla compressor in their builds... so if you can generate the required HV you should have the required technical info soon :cool:

That said, a lower voltage compressor would be a lot easier I suspect... EVTV have one that runs on 144V nominal (here) and is fully documented.
Thank you very much for your response.
As I'm not at all familiar with Electrical components and more adept on the mechanical end...How does one create so much voltage to run these compressors without adding enormous weight and complexity to a 12v system?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have two Tesla AC compressors. The 2015 version is CAN driven and may not be decipherable. The 2014 version is PWM controlled. Still unknown is the specifics of the PWM signal - but likely to be much easier to hack.

I should open up the control side of the 2015 compressor just to see if there is a Tesla control board inside - so there's a chance Damien can work his magic on it.

Jeff
Hi Jeff,

Sounds great...Please keep me informed..
As I've just posted, I really need to get my head around producing the power to run an EV compressor with as much simplicity and weight addition as possible..I read somewhere of a race prepped Corvette that ran the Chevy Volt compressor..
 

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...How does one create so much voltage to run these compressors without adding enormous weight and complexity to a 12v system?
Electric AC compressors make sense when you already have a high voltage traction battery (in Tesla's case 370v plus) in the car. For an EV the primary purpose of the battery is to drive the motive motor, but it can also efficiently drive an electric motor integrated into a compressor.

If you have a rotating engine (and likely constantly rotating at some speed even when the car isn't moving) then a ICE vehicle AC compressor is the most direct solution. Using the rotation of the engine to drive compression.

I've seen some EV conversion solutions where a small electric motor (separate from the traction motor) is used to spin a standard ICE compressor. This can be useful for lower voltage EV conversions that still want EV service without requiring the main motor to spin (to provide rotation to the compressor) even when the vehicle is not moving.

Jeff
 
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