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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any advice on the better of these two options - or any other options out there.
1) Use an electric compressor from a large hybrid vehicle- like this one from a Cadillac Escalade hybrid:
✅ 2008-2013 GMC YUKON 6.0L V8 ELECTRIC HYBRID AIR CONDITIONING AC COMPRESSOR OEM | eBay

2) Use a regular compressor. Remove the clutch and power it with a 1/2 hp (375w) dc motor. The power that would normally go to the clutch would control the relay that turns the motor on.
I think the first option would be more complicated, because I'd have to hack the circuitry. Also, I think used compressors are notorious for being unreliable.
Appreciate any input...
Thanks everyone,
Greg
 

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Hi Dr G. I have an old square body S10 we converted. I'm in sweltering SC. I left the AC out of the initial build, bad call! I recently upgraded the motor, added the AC back and switched to an auto transmission. I like saving $ but I also am a creature of comfort. My wh/mile went from averaging around 430 to close to 700! The AC really doesn't use a lot but because I went with an auto transmission I set the controller to idle around 700 rpm. Also had an electric alternator and went with an alternator. It has plusses and minuses but when coasting, you capture some regen energy with it to run the AC compressor and fan. Often I'll turn it off until coasting to a stop for a light etc. In the city it works out well.

Adding a separate motor to drive it means extra weight, extra electrical control and power wiring etc. Not sure what difference it would make if any. At least with my old compressor, I can get free energy when coasting and all the controls are already in place! :LOL:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Dr G. I have an old square body S10 we converted. I'm in sweltering SC. I left the AC out of the initial build, bad call! I recently upgraded the motor, added the AC back and switched to an auto transmission. I like saving $ but I also am a creature of comfort. My wh/mile went from averaging around 430 to close to 700! The AC really doesn't use a lot but because I went with an auto transmission I set the controller to idle around 700 rpm. Also had an electric alternator and went with an alternator. It has plusses and minuses but when coasting, you capture some regen energy with it to run the AC compressor and fan. Often I'll turn it off until coasting to a stop for a light etc. In the city it works out well.

Adding a separate motor to drive it means extra weight, extra electrical control and power wiring etc. Not sure what difference it would make if any. At least with my old compressor, I can get free energy when coasting and all the controls are already in place! :LOL:
Now, your method is a third option. It seems to be the least complicated... Do you simply drive the old compressor from a belt on the motor shaft?
 

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Now, your method is a third option. It seems to be the least complicated... Do you simply drive the old compressor from a belt on the motor shaft?
Yes. I had a friend make a bracket that attaches to the motor front. It is welded to the frame rails on both sides to hold the motor in position. It has the compressor and alternator mounted to it with an idler pulley. The motor pulley was from a salvage car crankshaft to drive it all. The compressor has 4 through holes for bolts to hold it to a bracket, alternator has two I believe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes. I had a friend make a bracket that attaches to the motor front. It is welded to the frame rails on both sides to hold the motor in position. It has the compressor and alternator mounted to it with an idler pulley. The motor pulley was from a salvage car crankshaft to drive it all. The compressor has 4 through holes for bolts to hold it to a bracket, alternator has two I believe.
Great job!
I really envy you guys who've completed a project! I've decided to start small and buy parts over time. That way the cost will be easier to spread.
 

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It was completed 1/2009. Started summer of 08. Well not completed but enough to start driving it! I have electrical drawings on all the things I've added. Put in a Cycle Analyst to monitor power capacity and built a balance meter to indicate if I've lost a battery. Finally lost one last week and it was immediately known. If you have any questions hit me up. Good luck, keep plugging on it! That EV grin is awesome when you first drive it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It was completed 1/2009. Started summer of 08. Well not completed but enough to start driving it! I have electrical drawings on all the things I've added. Put in a Cycle Analyst to monitor power capacity and built a balance meter to indicate if I've lost a battery. Finally lost one last week and it was immediately known. If you have any questions hit me up. Good luck, keep plugging on it! That EV grin is awesome when you first drive it!
Thanks!
That's really encouraging!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That GM electric compressor looks great. How does it operate do you just switch it on and off or does it need CAN or PWM control?
That's my concern exactly. I've no knowledge of these protocols, so I wish it was operated with a simple on/off relay. It has some circuitry, so I suppose it's CAN or PWM.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
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