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Has anyone tried an ammonia system, like old RV refrigerators and commercial cooling systems use? The system has to be in a secure spot with a weak point (a fuse of sorts) that would allow the ammonia to dissipate away from any passengers in case of a wreck or other failures. I was thinking it could be built into the battery container to keep it secure while keeping the batteries cool. And all it takes is a bit of heat to make it work. I am a newb here and this is my first post And while I am learning much about battery systems to fine tune my electric golf cart, I had to put my 2 cents in on an angle that may have been overlooked.
 

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Has anyone tried an ammonia system, like old RV refrigerators and commercial cooling systems use? The system has to be in a secure spot with a weak point (a fuse of sorts) that would allow the ammonia to dissipate away from any passengers in case of a wreck or other failures. I was thinking it could be built into the battery container to keep it secure while keeping the batteries cool. And all it takes is a bit of heat to make it work. I am a newb here and this is my first post And while I am learning much about battery systems to fine tune my electric golf cart, I had to put my 2 cents in on an angle that may have been overlooked.
Due to the highly toxic nature of ammonia and the potential danger to vehicle passengers and any unsuspecting emergency response personnel not to mention potential lawsuits this type of refrigeration should never be used.
 

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Due to the highly toxic nature of ammonia and the potential danger to vehicle passengers and any unsuspecting emergency response personnel not to mention potential lawsuits this type of refrigeration should never be used.
I wouldn't recommend anyone just try to make one, and if a pro was to make one he would install a leech line away from any potential passengers and build it inside a sturdy cage that was fabbed or ideally around existing framework.

The gas is quite deadly, but I wouldn't think any emergency personnel would be in any danger in the event of a crash just like if they responded to me after stabbing an aerosol can with a knife. It's under high pressure, and would evacuate in seconds.

There is a refrigerant that resembles ammonia's properties, if I'm not mistaken, that takes very little energy to produce extreme cold. I'd have to do a bit of digging, and right now I'm mutteling through calculations and specs for my own selfish needs.

I guess I should have added, "Don't try this at home kids."
 

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I wouldn't recommend anyone just try to make one, and if a pro was to make one he would install a leech line away from any potential passengers and build it inside a sturdy cage that was fabbed or ideally around existing framework.

The gas is quite deadly, but I wouldn't think any emergency personnel would be in any danger in the event of a crash just like if they responded to me after stabbing an aerosol can with a knife. It's under high pressure, and would evacuate in seconds.

There is a refrigerant that resembles ammonia's properties, if I'm not mistaken, that takes very little energy to produce extreme cold. I'd have to do a bit of digging, and right now I'm mutteling through calculations and specs for my own selfish needs.

I guess I should have added, "Don't try this at home kids."
Still there are too many variables to consider ammonia safe to use in a vehicle not to mention that said deadly gas is toxic in the PPM range.
Oh yes let's not forget the fire - explosion risk...
 

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Hey Roderick,

These days there are several OEMs electric units that are available for cooling and heating. I would hunt for a recent model, crashed Nissan Leaf and have the entire system transplanted. The Leaf can keep you cool while using only 250 to 500W. Their heatpump is also the most efficient way to heat the cabin.

JR
 

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I haven't seen much of this mentioned here but something that helps with keeping a car cool is the color (white, silver) and insulating the doors and floor. Also window tinting helps alot, they have some available with very light tint that still reflects infrared rays. Just some easy/cost effective things i would do to help reduce heat before installing an ac unit.
 

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Thermionic coolers are very inefficient, which is why the more complicated mechanical refrigerator is used for all but the smallest cooling loads, i.e. something like a beer cooler.
 

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Hey Roderick,

These days there are several OEMs electric units that are available for cooling and heating. I would hunt for a recent model, crashed Nissan Leaf and have the entire system transplanted. The Leaf can keep you cool while using only 250 to 500W. Their heatpump is also the most efficient way to heat the cabin.

JR
Alright, so I am interested in doing this in 2017.... I know the Leaf, Prius, and some others have electric A/C compressors. It should be a simple matter to replace the OEM compressor on the donor vehicle with a Leaf compressor for instance, and add some custom A/C lines so that the adapter fittings work. However the thing that worries me is the controller... I can't seem to find out how much of the electronics would need to be reacquired out of a wrecked Leaf to get the A/C compressor to work. Seems that a lot of these fancy electric A/C compressors will require quite a bit more than an on/off switch to get them functional...

If anyone has a real world example of how they have pulled this off... I would love to know... Example:
- I bought the used compressor from a [Leaf]
- I also bought this _____ module from a [Leaf]
- I spliced this _____ wire harness from a [Leaf] to my vehicle
and bada-bing bada-boom I have A/C :)

Thanks!
 

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Alright, so I am interested in doing this in 2017.... I know the Leaf, Prius, and some others have electric A/C compressors. It should be a simple matter to replace the OEM compressor on the donor vehicle with a Leaf compressor for instance, and add some custom A/C lines so that the adapter fittings work. However the thing that worries me is the controller... I can't seem to find out how much of the electronics would need to be reacquired out of a wrecked Leaf to get the A/C compressor to work. Seems that a lot of these fancy electric A/C compressors will require quite a bit more than an on/off switch to get them functional...

If anyone has a real world example of how they have pulled this off... I would love to know... Example:
- I bought the used compressor from a [Leaf]
- I also bought this _____ module from a [Leaf]
- I spliced this _____ wire harness from a [Leaf] to my vehicle
and bada-bing bada-boom I have A/C :)

Thanks!
I have Leaf AC compressor and tubing at home.
I havent resolved the interface problem though. It is supposed to be UART protocol but i cant replicate it with my comp.
Does anyone have a scope with ability to decode protocols from signal? I would need TX signal bits from compressor turn on up to 3000rpm steady.
I would use compressor on manual load. No fancy regulation...

anyone?
 

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OK so the issue of turning on the compressor is daunting on a can bus level. But why are we stuck in controlling it that way. At some level this is an electric compressor and if the motor is powered it will compress. Can't we just break it open and go to the motor itself?

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 

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Another system that I’ve thought of recently is recently is regenerative AC. Would be particularly useful for cars that don’t have regen braking, don’t know how much reduction it causes in regen efficiency on cars that do though. Basically a compressor that is coupled into the drivetrain, driven by the wheels when brakes are applied and some kind of thermal storage for when you’re not braking. It could also kick in from time to time when you’re not needing a lot of power as it needs to.
 

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Yeah that would likely be the case, I guess having a conventional type AC belt driven from the motor that decouples from the motor on heavy acceleration might work but not as efficient.

I might look at going down the path of the icebox idea mentioned earlier in this post and expand on it. My thoughts are to buy or build a small freezer that fits under the bonnet where the ICE (international combustion engine type) used to be, where there is space left by the smaller electric motor. Upgrade internal lining insulation if necessary. Put bottles or tubes of water inside freezer, run air tubes through freezer that connect to internal air vents. The freezer is powered through the charging input only and freezes the water then, the frozen water cools the car when on the road. Basically replacing ICE with ice but neither are the type that are going to get the attention of the police.

Might not work for quick charging though.
 
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