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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
An Alltrax 4834 speed controller came with a ME0708 PM motor I bought (was supposed to be a ME0709)

I tested the motor (seems to work fine)
...& now, I'm trying to connect this controller

I downloaded the wiring diagram (even printed a few copies to draw on & make notes)

It seems pretty simple
...but, the diagram shows a "foot switch" incorporated in with the throttle
...& it's in the circuit between the key switch & the controllers KSI (tab #1) & also, the contactor

So, it looks like each time the accelerator is activated, this "foot switch" activates the contactor
...& also, turns the speed controller "on"

Then, each time the accelerator is released this "foot switch" deactivates the contactor
...& also, turns the speed controller "off"

Is this necessary?

* Also, the Alltrax AXE 4834 specifications say that these controllers are compatible with different throttle inputs
Throttle Input:
  • ITS (inductive)
  • Resistive 0-5K ohm (+/-10%) (2-wire and 3-Wire)
  • Resistive 5K-0 ohm (+/-10%)
  • 0-5Volt
  • 6-10Volt
The LED Blink Codes occur at power up, the number of green blinks indicates the throttle configuration:
  • 1 Green LED flash = 0-5 kohm resistive
  • 2 Green LED flashes = 5K-0 ohm resistive
  • 3 Green LED flashes = 0-5 Volt
  • 4 Green LED flashes = EZ-GO inductive (ITS)
  • 5 Green LED flashes = Yamaha 0-1K ohm resistive
  • 6 Green LED flashes = Taylor-Dunn 6-10.5 Volt
  • 7 Green LED flashes = ClubCar 5k-0 ohms, 3-wire throttle
But, it doesn't specify how change the throttle configuration?

I'd like to use a simple 0-5V throttle
...but, it requires a 5V power supply
...so, I added a (48V to 5V) DC to DC convertor, to the diagram & the throttle too
(does this look correct?)

** Another also,
I notice on the diagram it says "* Note for motorcycle use: motor wires need to be 3' to 5' long. Coil extra wire into 4" loops & zip tie together."

What is this for/do/or help?
Font Handwriting Parallel Rectangle Diagram
 

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An Alltrax 4834 speed controller came with a ME0708 PM motor I bought (was supposed to be a ME0709)

I tested the motor (seems to work fine)
...& now, I'm trying to connect this controller

I downloaded the wiring diagram (even printed a few copies to draw on & make notes)

It seems pretty simple
...but, the diagram shows a "foot switch" incorporated in with the throttle
...& it's in the circuit between the key switch & the controllers KSI (tab #1) & also, the contactor

So, it looks like each time the accelerator is activated, this "foot switch" activates the contactor
...& also, turns the speed controller "on"

Then, each time the accelerator is released this "foot switch" deactivates the contactor
...& also, turns the speed controller "off"

Is this necessary?

* Also, the Alltrax AXE 4834 specifications say that these controllers are compatible with different throttle inputs
Throttle Input:
  • ITS (inductive)
  • Resistive 0-5K ohm (+/-10%) (2-wire and 3-Wire)
  • Resistive 5K-0 ohm (+/-10%)
  • 0-5Volt
  • 6-10Volt
The LED Blink Codes occur at power up, the number of green blinks indicates the throttle configuration:
  • 1 Green LED flash = 0-5 kohm resistive
  • 2 Green LED flashes = 5K-0 ohm resistive
  • 3 Green LED flashes = 0-5 Volt
  • 4 Green LED flashes = EZ-GO inductive (ITS)
  • 5 Green LED flashes = Yamaha 0-1K ohm resistive
  • 6 Green LED flashes = Taylor-Dunn 6-10.5 Volt
  • 7 Green LED flashes = ClubCar 5k-0 ohms, 3-wire throttle
But, it doesn't specify how change the throttle configuration?

I'd like to use a simple 0-5V throttle
...but, it requires a 5V power supply
...so, I added a (48V to 5V) DC to DC convertor, to the diagram & the throttle too
(does this look correct?)

** Another also,
I notice on the diagram it says "* Note for motorcycle use: motor wires need to be 3' to 5' long. Coil extra wire into 4" loops & zip tie together."

What is this for/do/or help? View attachment 129823
I can probably answer a few questions for you on this.

The foot switch circuit works like a built in safety switch. If something goes wrong your first reaction is to get off the throttle which will cause the solenoid to open and the controller to shut off putting everything into a "safe" mode. It is not essential to operation though, the controller can be powered up from your keyswitch so it stays on so long as the key is on if you'd rather. Solenoids are "Normally open" in these applications so having it controlled by a footswitch or "throttle switch" of some kind will make sure the solenoid lasts and keep it from over heating and causing other issues. Technically you can also use a large breaker in place of the solenoid, you see that a lot on go-kart applications with these controllers.

To program the controller you'll need a USB to SERIAL cable, make sure to get one compatible with whatever version of windows you're using.

The software for it is free to download on alltraxinc dot com (I don't know the rules about posting direct links here) click on legacy prodcuts, controller pro software and CONTROLLER PRO 39 is the program you want. There's also troubleshooting and technical info on the program on that page.

The controller has to be powered to program, you can do that by apply 16v to pin 1 (closest to the LED) and ground of the power source to B-, the LED will come on and it's ready to be programmed. Once inside the software just click on the throttle settings tab, pick the throttle type you want and hit the set button.

You don't want to power your solenoid off the DC to DC converter.

Also Alltrax will still give tech support on these if you want to talk to someone directly. 541-476-3565 ext 103
 

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I can probably answer a few questions for you on this.

The foot switch circuit works like a built in safety switch. If something goes wrong your first reaction is to get off the throttle which will cause the solenoid to open and the controller to shut off putting everything into a "safe" mode. It is not essential to operation though, the controller can be powered up from your keyswitch so it stays on so long as the key is on if you'd rather. Solenoids are "Normally open" in these applications so having it controlled by a footswitch or "throttle switch" of some kind will make sure the solenoid lasts and keep it from over heating and causing other issues. Technically you can also use a large breaker in place of the solenoid, you see that a lot on go-kart applications with these controllers.

To program the controller you'll need a USB to SERIAL cable, make sure to get one compatible with whatever version of windows you're using.

The software for it is free to download on alltraxinc dot com (I don't know the rules about posting direct links here) click on legacy prodcuts, controller pro software and CONTROLLER PRO 39 is the program you want. There's also troubleshooting and technical info on the program on that page.

The controller has to be powered to program, you can do that by apply 16v to pin 1 (closest to the LED) and ground of the power source to B-, the LED will come on and it's ready to be programmed. Once inside the software just click on the throttle settings tab, pick the throttle type you want and hit the set button.

You don't want to power your solenoid off the DC to DC converter.

Also Alltrax will still give tech support on these if you want to talk to someone directly. 541-476-3565 ext 103
[/QUO
Sorry, was looking back over the diagram and realize I mispoke about your DC to DC having it grounded that way is fine.
 

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That setup with the microswitch in the throttle is pretty common in golf carts and similar vehicles, it is called "interlock." On Curtis and Sevcon controller interlock and contactor behaviors can be configured in a variety of ways, but looking at this Alltrax doc https://alltraxinc.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Doc100-003-B_OP-AXE-Operators-Manual.pdf I don't see much. You could probably just short it. By default there appears to be a feature to prevent power output when throttle is applied, so perhaps that will prevent accidental takeoffs at keying the vehicle. Additionally if you use a contactor with an economizer, it won't be sucking much blood from your batteries while idling, which is what closing contactor on interlock would prevent in addition to extra safety.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, I connected the controller as per the diagram (pic in first post)

When I switched it "on" the green LED light, flashed (3) times
...according to the manual, indicates the throttle is configured for use with 0-5V
...then, it stayed on steady, green
Normal display status:
  • Solid Green: Controller ready to run
  • Solid Red: Controller in programming mode (using Controller Pro)
  • Solid Yellow: Controller throttle is wide open, controller is supplying max output, and is not in current limit.
But, when I activated the throttle, nothing happened (no buzz, no hum, no pop, no nothing)

Um...any ideas?
 

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Are you picking up voltage between pins 2 and 3 as you're manipulating the throttle ? One thing that is unclear is polarity - see if either of pin 2 or 3 rings short to B-

Also is your DC-DC actually isolated ? 4 wires shown, non-isolated would be 3 wire one or the two grounds (between input and output) would have a short.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
With the controller "on" (green light on steady)
...& without the throttle being applied, I'm getting 0.46V @ pin 3
...but, it does not change when the throttle is applied

Between pin 1 & 2 I got 49V (pack voltage)
...& 5.1V coming out he DC to DC convertor

I have everything connected as per the diagram
...so, please explain isolated & non-isolated
...where
...& why
 

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I already explained - your DC-DC is shown with 4 wires. Do you have a short circuit between negative (ground) on input and negative on output of the converter ? If it's an isolated converter, then the controller may fail to pickup the throttle voltage because it's being measured in relation to the Battery-

Some fancy brands often have throttle input isolated from the battery pack, but I don't expect for this to be the case here. So one more time - see if pin 2 or 3 ring short to Bat- and also check your DC-DC converter as described above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
UM...I'm not sure what this phrase means "see if either of pin 2 or 3 rings short to B-"
...sorry I just never heard the term "rings short"

If you mean does pin 2 or 3 "test" as B-
...then yes, pin 2 test's as B-

When testing (negative probe on pin 2 & the positive probe on pin 3) is where I get the 0.46V
...& it does not change when the throttle is actuated.

But, when I tested the throttle (without the white signal wire attached to the controller)
...it tests 0.83V (at rest)
...& then, slowly raises to 4.4V, when actuated

* Notice, the "at rest" voltage, of the throttle signal wire, seems to drop by ~50% when it is attached to pin 3

Yes, both the negative on input & on output of the DC to DC seem to "test" as B-

** The specs of the DC to Dc convertor say that it's non-isolated

M309 power Convertor
Specifications:

  • Epoxy sealed waterproof housing
  • Lightweight, compact, convenient to use and transport
  • Non-isolated
  • With overload / over-current / over / low voltage protection, stable performance
  • Auto recovery
  • Input voltage: 8DC ~100DC nominal, will operate on any input voltage from 8DCV ~100DCV
  • Quiescent input current (no load attached): <10mA
  • Output voltage: 5V DC 1.5Amp
  • Efficiency: >96%
  • Size (L x W x H): 38 * 27 * 23 mm (Length including mounting tabs is 52mm)
  • Weight: 30g
  • Case color: White
  • Cable length: 12cm (approx)
 

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Excellent, so this clarifies a lot of things. By "rings short" I meant to set the multi-meter to the continuity test which will beep when there is a short :D

So what throttle are you using ? do you have the pinout for it ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks, for the clarification. (& I learned a kool new term)

Yes, when testing both negatives of the convertor, they "ring short" ;)

I'm using a standard (low cost) hall effect 0-5V thumb throttle (like for scooters) ~$10.00
...they are very simple & usually very reliable

Their usually wired with a red wire for the 5V+ power supply, a black wire for the negative & the color of the third (signal) wire varies (blue, green, white etc.)
 

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I am familiar with those, it may give you some other trouble with the output voltage range. So disconnect the signal wire from the controller, and measure the voltage on the throttle alone as it's powered from DC-DC. To double check - you have the throttle signal wire hooked up to pin 3 ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yes, I double checked, that the throttle "signal" wire was connected to pin 3 ;)

I also, tested the throttle (without the white "signal" wire attached to the controller)
...to verify it's functionality.

With the DC to DC convertor connected & powered "on", I had the negative probe connected to the throttle's negative (which is also, connected to the convertors 5V output side)
...& had the positive probe connected to the "signal" wire

It tested 0.83V (at rest)
...& then, slowly raises to 4.4V, when the throttle is actuated

So, the throttle seems to function properly :)

But, like I mentioned earlier, I get the 0.46V, when the "signal" wire is connected to pin 3
(~50% drop from the 8.3V when tested alone)
...& then, it does not change from that 0.46V when the throttle is actuated.
 

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Try to connect your multimeter inline with the signal wire and see how much current the controller is sinking from the throttle. It's possible it's drawing so much for some reason, so the hall effect sensor can't provide the adequate output.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
To program the controller you'll need a USB to SERIAL cable, make sure to get one compatible with whatever version of windows you're using.

The software for it is free to download on alltraxinc dot com (I don't know the rules about posting direct links here) click on legacy prodcuts, controller pro software and CONTROLLER PRO 39 is the program you want. There's also troubleshooting and technical info on the program on that page.

The controller has to be powered to program, you can do that by apply 16v to pin 1 (closest to the LED) and ground of the power source to B-, the LED will come on and it's ready to be programmed. Once inside the software just click on the throttle settings tab, pick the throttle type you want and hit the set button.
I connected a cable to the computer & checked the programming/settings

In the first tab
Control Panel
Settings

Max output was set @ 100%
Under-voltage @ 20V
over-voltage @ 55V
Throttle up rate 5
Throttle down rate 5
Brake Current 0% (no regen)
Top Speed 100%

Switches
The only option "checked" was High Pedal Disable
Brown Font Wood Technology Pattern

The second tab
Throttle Response
Throttle Sensor Type was set @ 0-5V
Throttle Response was set @ Linear (the other options were S-Curve, Progressive & Inductive)
Handwriting Wood Rectangle Font Material property

The third tab
Monitor
Didn't really tell much (because nothing was actually happening like controlling a motor)
...but, there didn't seem to be any "Error Flags"
Wood Handwriting Font Electronic device Technology

The only thing that I could think that may be causing issues was the "High Pedal Disable"
...or maybe the throttle response setting?

So, I'm thinking I'll un-check the High Pedal Disable
...& test again tomorrow
 

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None of your controller settings besides the throttle type may have any effect on the fact you're not picking up expected throttle voltage. The few things that could impact that would be throttle wiring, faulty throttle, or incompatible throttle. Last one isn't very likely, but basically you have something like SS49E in there, which is rated for 20mA max. If the controller is sinking more than 20mA, your voltage will drop before the controller picks it up. One other way you can test your setup is by using a AA or similar battery - hooking it up between pins 2 and 3 (mind the polarity!) should get that thing going at some 25% or so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I tried (2) AA batteries (wired in series & tested @ 3.6V) connected pins 2 (to neg) & 3 (to plus)
...& still nothing (I even tried straight 5V off of the DC to DC convertor, with no results)

Yes, I had the "power wires" connected for this "isolated" throttle signal test
...& the controller switched "on" (LED solid green)

I also, tried to "open the controller up" to see if I could see (or smell) anything "out of the ordinary"
...but, these controllers are totally "potted"

Then, I noticed, on the label of this controller is printed (0-5K) :confused:

The Alltrax documents on AXE controllers say that their compatible with many different throttle types
...& as we saw, the programming has different throttle type "options" available too

* So, I'm wondering why would it be "specifically" labeled (0-5K), if it's compatible with other throttles?

** What else could that 0-5K (prominently displayed, on the label, just under the model number) stand for? (besides throttle input)
Font Rectangle Gas Label Electric blue
 

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It could be labeled 0-5k due to default programming. Anyway, without anything connected measure the voltage between pins 2 and 3. If it's expecting a pot in there, there should be some voltage.
 
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