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I'd want a cap test, CC dummy load at a slow rate, from 50+V full down to 36V empty

See how much of that rated amp-hour capacity is remaining.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
John, you are now speaking a language I do not understand. Are the tests you are requesting destructive? How easy are they to run?

Looks like the are the replacements for the older 60.8V lg chems that went into the Chrysler stuff.
 

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He's looking for a capacity test, constant current. If you look at the eBay listing, it looks like that was done. At 10 Amps, looks like 32-33 Ah.
 

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Looks like the are the replacements for the older 60.8V lg chems that went into the Chrysler stuff.
The 60.8V LG Chem modules were (and presumably still are) used in the Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid; I can't think of any reason for that battery pack to be reconfigured. FCA is not a fan of EVs, and I can't think of any current model that these might be out of. 33 Ah at 360 V would be about 12 kWh (nominal), which is consistent with a plug-in hybrid; the listing says "hybrid SUV". The only plug-in hybrid FCA SUV that I can think of is the Wrangler 4xe, which has barely been introduced and isn't even available yet. FCA's electrification plan also includes a PHEV Renegade 4xe and Compass version which were shown, reviewed... and might even exist, but you can't buy them in North America.

I don't know how these distributors are getting these modules, but it seems shady to me. I'm sure the modules are fine, but I doubt anyone could produce a legitimate paper trail for them that LG Chem and FCA would find acceptable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The 60.8V LG Chem modules were (and presumably still are) used in the Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid; I can't think of any reason for that battery pack to be reconfigured. FCA is not a fan of EVs, and I can't think of any current model that these might be out of. 33 Ah at 360 V would be about 12 kWh (nominal), which is consistent with a plug-in hybrid; the listing says "hybrid SUV". The only plug-in hybrid FCA SUV that I can think of is the Wrangler 4xe, which has barely been introduced and isn't even available yet. FCA's electrification plan also includes a PHEV Renegade 4xe and Compass version which were shown, reviewed... and might even exist, but you can't buy them in North America.

I don't know how these distributors are getting these modules, but it seems shady to me. I'm sure the modules are fine, but I doubt anyone could produce a legitimate paper trail for them that LG Chem and FCA would find acceptable.
Agreed, but at this price, it is the risk I am willing to take to get my EV truck at least driving around the block. Using these for the stepping stone to get the rest of the system ironed out. Then go back and get better batteries. Use these for something else, like go carts.
 

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Using these for the stepping stone to get the rest of the system ironed out. Then go back and get better batteries.
I doubt there's anything wrong with the modules themselves - they're probably as good as you can get from any manufacturer, unless they should have been scrapped because of problems during module assembly (and selling those would be very shady). The cells would have been tested when they were made, and LG Chem wouldn't use substandard cells in a module sold under their name.

It's the supply arrangement, not the modules themselves, that bothers me.
 

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To verify capacity yourself

ideally per cell but that may not be practical

next best, smallest sub-pack voltage that is practical

Worst case each pack as a whole at the full-pck level voltage.

Buy a suitable dummy load tester, ideally one that outputs data (Voltage, Amps, Watts derived, over time) that a PC program can analyze and render graphs.

Or if poor, gang DC headlights, LEDs or inverters+ bar heaters, hair dryers, or just "brake load" resistors

you are looking for handling the ballpark right voltage, drawing between .05C (twenty hour rate) up to say 0.3-4C.

The key is keeping the current drawn as precisely constant as possible

from the 100% SoC point, down to say 3.0Vpc. Then all that's needed is a precise timer, and an app that takes say 200 photos automatically over the time period, if you want those graphs without a datalogger.

Or if your CC is only rough, get a wattmeter that counts coulombs to give you cumulative Ah.

If the cells turn out to have lost over 20-25% of rated capacity, most companies would call them EoL scrap

and the potential risk of "thermal runaway" (boom bad!) is exponentially higher than when "as new"
 
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