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Never knew where the expletive-like expression Nuts came from. I sort of thought it had to do with getting kicked in them. Now I'm thinking it has to do with removing the air intake/exhaust manifold from a 1985 VW Cabriolet. There are something like 10 bolts to be removed. Some require crescent wrenches, others allen. With generous help we removed 8 or 9. Obviously these 8 or 9 are completely unnecessary because the thing is held very securely by the other one or two. The problem is you have to find these rusted suckers entirely by feel. They are on the back of the engine and cannot be seen from top or underneath.

After working on that for a while, I started sawing the exhaust pipe in two. Got bored with the slow progress (think I need a better saw or power tool). So I started on the gas tank.

I had already siphoned as much fuel as I could out of the tank. But I'm guessing there's still some gas and fumes in the tank and fuel lines. As I'm working on the tank, I've got 2 halogen lights whose heat output is exceeded only by the sun. I get so hot that my goggles keep fogging. In addition I've got a more portable incandescent light using an extension cord next to me. The first think I try is to remove the fuel line from it's lowest point. The idea is to let any remaining fuel drop into a bucket. But the chances that I will accomplish this neatly are slim. So I consider what will happen if the gas (or fumes) get near the light. That's when I see myself as an unintentional car bomber. I go to move the fire extinguisher closer to me and someone's moved it (not good). By this time I decide it's time to tackle this on another day when my resevoir of patience has been replenished.

Noah did lend a hand. I had him try to remove a couple of things but they are rusty and it's going to take more strength. I'm even having a difficult time.

I keep reminding myself that all of this was to be expected and this is fun.
 

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I'd strongly recommend using a florescent drop light if there is a chance of gas being sprayed; they run relatively cool.

Halogens are the worst! the glass tube itself is red hot and will ignite practically anything on contact.
 

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Id add water to any gas tank i was going to remove, and leave it uncapped. An open tank will burn, and sealed take will explode!
 

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An old welder's trick is to fill the gas tank with CO2 (carbon dioxide), which is heavier than air and will remove all oxygen from the tank. Oxygen is required for combustion, so the gas cannot ignite while the tank is filled with CO2. Drain the gas, leave it out in the driveway for a couple days with the lid off, so the remainder of the gas will evaporate, then close the drain and fill the tank with CO2 (you can get it at a welder's supply) and you can even weld on the tank without danger of explosion.

To tell the truth, I have removed the gas tanks from several vehicles and not even worried about it. Drain the tank as much as possible, close the filler cap, plug the fuel line opening, and remove the tank. Just work in a well-ventilated area, ie leave the garage door wide open.
 

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By the way, alexcrouse indicated that one should fill the gas tank with water, then leave it open, and that a closed tank will explode, while an open tank will burn. I do not mean to be offensive, but that is absolutely false!!!!!!!!! DO NOT WORK ON AN OPEN GAS TANK, UNLESS YOU FILL IT WITH C02!!! Gasoline is lighter than water and even after a tank has been drained, the remaining gas will lay on top of the water and continue to release fumes. If left open, the fumes will fill the area around the gas tank, and if there is an ignition source, even turning on a light switch or unplugging an appliance or tool, there could be an explosion.

I repeat, FILLING THE TANK WITH WATER AND LEAVING IT OPEN IS BAD ADVICE. Doing so could cause serious injury or death.

It is not the gasoline that burns, but the fumes. The fumes are a gas and fill the capacity of any enclosed space they are in, whether it is a gas tank or a closed garage. Any ingnition source will then cause a very big bang.

On the other hand, when a tank is closed, no ignition source can get in. Drain the tank (mostly to reduce the weight), close it up, then remove it! Simple, easy. Just don't work in an enclosed space, so that any fumes will quickly disperse. No fumes, no chance of explosion.
 
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