DIY Electric Car Forums banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It seems that, due to issues beyond my control, the LifePo4 batteries have skyrocketed in price and the only ones available locally are 200Ah ea so I am looking at 112 cells in series and I think that is easily on par cost wise with a M3 pack. Is the Tesla M3 pack decipherable to the mortal man yet? I may have asked this before but I can't remember at all (or find any evidence, LOL).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
911 Posts
For 99.99% of people in the west, no such thing as the LFP cells you want being available "locally"

aka on your continent.

Ordering in from China just goes with the territory

2-3 months wait being very optimistic

$2/Ah being cheap for quality cells.

Now wrecked EV packs are a whole 'nother beast, nearly as rare, but even dicier you're going to get the good stuff.

What is your use case?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
For 99.99% of people in the west, no such thing as the LFP cells you want being available "locally"

aka on your continent.

Ordering in from China just goes with the territory

2-3 months wait being very optimistic

$2/Ah being cheap for quality cells.

Now wrecked EV packs are a whole 'nother beast, nearly as rare, but even dicier you're going to get the good stuff.

What is your use case?
Full size dual leaf motor VW pickup truck. I was going to get 100kwh of LFP4 for $22k Cdn from a manufacturer of commercial sized powerwalls but that fell through (price went way up and container cost from China are 4 times the usual). Now looking at a used M3 pack and wondering whether I can actually make it work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,211 Posts
I am only aware of two projects using Tesla Model 3 battery modules, and both are using them with Model 3 motors:
Tesla Powered Cobra Race Car (here in DIY Electric Car)
SuperfastMatt: Tesla Powered Jag (YouTube)

Of course the usual problem is the length of the Model 3 modules, but I assume that the LT has enough length for them (almost 2 metres, allowing for some structure and packaging).

Make sure you get the full capacity battery ("Long Range")- the lower-capacity battery ("Standard Range") is the same size, but just has fewer cells (and empty spaces where the "missing" cells would be) for less cost, weight, and capacity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am only aware of two projects using Tesla Model 3 battery modules, and both are using them with Model 3 motors:
Tesla Powered Cobra Race Car (here in DIY Electric Car)
SuperfastMatt: Tesla Powered Jag (YouTube)

Of course the usual problem is the length of the Model 3 modules, but I assume that the LT has enough length for them (almost 2 metres, allowing for some structure and packaging).

Make sure you get the full capacity battery ("Long Range")- the lower-capacity battery ("Standard Range") is the same size, but just has fewer cells (and empty spaces where the "missing" cells would be) for less cost, weight, and capacity.
Lots of room in this frame but I won't decide to do anything with Tesla batteries unless I have a solid answer to control with the two Leaf motors, charging and the BMS working properly. Unfortunately, I don't have the skill or patience to follow Damien around and/or read his mind or I'd be able to do a lot more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,211 Posts
Lots of room in this frame but I won't decide to do anything with Tesla batteries unless I have a solid answer to control with the two Leaf motors, charging and the BMS working properly. Unfortunately, I don't have the skill or patience to follow Damien around and/or read his mind or I'd be able to do a lot more.
Since you were not planning on a Leaf battery anyone, the switch to a Model 3 battery means the need to manage the battery (only) with some aftermarket solution (using the Tesla components or not). Sorry, I don't know what there is for that, but those two builders may have an idea, even though they are using the Model 3 motor/inverter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Since you were not planning on a Leaf battery anyone, the switch to a Model 3 battery means the need to manage the battery (only) with some aftermarket solution (using the Tesla components or not). Sorry, I don't know what there is for that, but those two builders may have an idea, even though they are using the Model 3 motor/inverter.
Oddly enough, due to the fact that there is a 62kwh leaf battery available and it has a nice form factor, I may reconsider it. Even if I get 2 40kwh packs which will fit easily in the truck, that is 80kwh (less degradation) which is not bad. It's hard to find any 62kwh packs yet but we will see. Working with the Leaf batteries is a much more known process too. The 24kwh packs were just not enticing enough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Oddly enough, due to the fact that there is a 62kwh leaf battery available and it has a nice form factor, I may reconsider it. Even if I get 2 40kwh packs which will fit easily in the truck, that is 80kwh (less degradation) which is not bad. It's hard to find any 62kwh packs yet but we will see. Working with the Leaf batteries is a much more known process too. The 24kwh packs were just not enticing enough.
Since you have the room, you could buy some of these. Heavy, but the BMS solutions are known and you get cooling/heating for the packs, which may be a bigger deal where you live.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,211 Posts
Since you have the room, you could buy some of these. Heavy, but the BMS solutions are known and you get cooling/heating for the packs, which may be a bigger deal where you live.
The later i3 modules have the same configuration and presumably the same dimensions (even weight), but they have 94 Ah and 120 Ah capacity. Even with the highest-capacity modules, you're still looking at two parallel strings to get decent capacity for the truck.

Some i3 battery references...
DIY Electric Car:
Classic mini resto and conversion (just module dimensions)​
BMW
YouTube
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top