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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the best way to put lugs on the battery cables? I was thinking of using FTZ or similar high quality tinned lugs. Best brand/place to get them?

Method of attachment:

1. Expensive hex crimper.
2. Buy the "fusion" terminals with solder in them and heat them up.
3. $10 hammer crimper.

Ideas and/or experiences? Failures?

Thanks!
 

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Ruckus I can help you out here. I am a Telecom Power Engineer for all the big boys are they use the best products, tooling and methods money can buy. Basically any battery or power connections are designed to last 30 years.

You want to use Lead Plated Compression Terminals on battery term post and inter-cell connections. The best out there are Burndy. CLICK HERE TO SEE LIST EDIT: click Uninsulated > Terminals > Lead Plated to see product list



You want to use a tool made specifically for the terminals that when used will make a LISTED COMPRESSION. These are usually hydraulic 14 and 15 ton tools either battery operated or some are hand pump or AC powered. You will need to look at the selected terminal to determine which tool is appropriate like THIS ONE and use the proper set of dies.

The other thing you will want to do is use a anti-oxidant compound. When you skin the wire you want to lightly coat the conductors before applying the terminal and compressing it. Then clean the mating surfaces between the terminal and contact surface with a light coat of compound. Here is the best compound ever made. NO-OX-ID A Special
 

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I generally use tin plated Magna Lugs and this crimper that I bought years ago (that used to cost A LOT less.)

I have not had any connection issues using this hardware. I generally use a hardware store dissimilar metal grease (commonly used for aluminum connections.) I wipe a thin film inside the terminal and on the stripped wire end. You don't want to much because if you create a hydraulic lock inside when crimping you will break the terminal. I cover all terminals with sealant lined heat shrink, in red for positive and black for negative.
 

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I generally use tin plated Magna Lugs and this crimper that I bought years ago (that used to cost A LOT less.)

I have not had any connection issues using this hardware. I generally use a hardware store dissimilar metal grease (commonly used for aluminum connections.) I wipe a thin film inside the terminal and on the stripped wire end. You don't want to much because if you create a hydraulic lock inside when crimping you will break the terminal. I cover all terminals with sealant lined heat shrink, in red for positive and black for negative.
You can save about $80.00 on that crimping tool here:

http://www.cloudelectric.com/product_p/to-4255.htm
 

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Good work finding a deal.:) I paid about $80 less than the Cloud Electric price, but that was 12 years ago!
 
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Hammer Crimping was my choice and the quality has been excellent. Quality of the crimp has been just as tight or tighter than quality crimp tools. I have cut many to determine my needs. I only built one conversion so I could not see the value in spending huge bucks on all that stuff. Now if I were to do a few or more then spending the money on a good professional crimper might be a good choice but you need to get a real good one.

If you go with the heavy tinned lugs then you need to have a squeeze crimper rather than a hammer one. I am sure a hammer one may work but they work best on the thinner copper lugs.

Mine are still in excellent condition and about 3 years old now.

Pete :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byZOL3XgKgA
 

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don't solder.

if you are only doing one car, especially if going Li and only need a few cable ends, a hammer crimper will be fine. if you are doing LOTS, a quality hex crimper is faster. Both result in great connections, especially if you follow with quality glued heat-shrink over cable/lug joint.
 

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A look a BIG stand up fork truck batteries will reveal that Solder is never used. Pure Lead is used to put a new cable on. So that leaves a compression connector for us non Lead mold guys.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I bought the same crimper off ebay for just under $60 incl shipping.
Roy
DOH!! :eek: :eek:

That looks like a killer deal. Only issue is it only goes to 2/0. My guy decided to go with 4/0. :rolleyes: I guess we DO have high current flow (1000A) and low voltage (96v).

I missed a $300 hex crimper for $50 cause my $%*@# internet went down 3 min. before the auction ended. I ended up buying a heavy-duty mechanical crimper. Unfortunately it has a u-crimp instead of a hex. But I think it will work ok. I also have a hammer crimper that I haven't used. Not sure about it, but folks here seem to be happy with the results.

I will post pics when I do some crimps.
 

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Probably not the same, as that one only goes to 00, but if that's all you need, Harbor freight has it for $45 on coupon ;)

Make sure the kit you are buying has the chrome plated dies. For some reason, up to about 3 monts ago when I last checked the kits with the chrome dies were not available in the US. You had to go to Australia or Europe to get one. I haven't checked lately.

Be sure the seller guantees that the set has the chrome dies, not the black ones. The chrome 00 dies measure about 3/8 inch accros the flats and the black 00 dies measue 5/16 or so.

The kits like the Harbor Freight ones have black dies that are undersized. The one I bought have the die marked 00 will only handle 6 AWG with heavy lugs or 4 AWG with light (thin) lugs.

The remaing dies are also undersized. The one marked 12AWG would maybe crimp an uninsulated 18 AWG lug.

If you are going to do 0 and up cable, the next size up kit, the 16 ton, has dies of the proper AWG sze.
 

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I would make up a wire & lug size list. drive over to each electrican locally & beg in their shop for a price that is cheaper than buying all the compression gear.

Their gear has the EXACT SIZE that will be needed.Copper or Aluminum They should also pick the right size. IF your batteries have Aluminium connections. USE ALUMINUM RATED lugs. Copper & aluminum pressed together causes Galvanic corrosion between them at high current flows. Metal transfer & then lower pressure between the cable & battery posts.

Make sure you get the correct bolt hole sizes by taking the correct size bolts or nuts with you when you order the lugs.
Wrong ones come. Refuse them. Lots of places refuse to accept special order electrical Aluminium lugs BACK....NO REFUND.....Pay only by a credit card. Make sure there are no fees if the wrong lugs come in. Credit card ONLY. If the place says not credit card. DO NOT ORDER THERE. They are telling you they do NOT KNOW what they are doing. My take on electrical places.

I have 6 local electrical places. Only 2 are perfect. Wrong part comes in, they call about a delay, the right ones come in. I only have to make 1 pleasant trip to pick up the correct parts at the agreed price.

Specify what you want & expect. It makes the order easier for both of you if a problem comes up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Make sure you get the correct bolt hole sizes by taking the bolts or nuts with you...
Pay only by a credit card.
Make sure there are no fees if the wrong lugs come in.
Credit card ONLY. If the place says no credit card. DO NOT ORDER THERE.
Specify what you want & expect. It makes the order easier for both of you if a problem comes up.
This is good advice for buying ANY components... :)
 

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I highly suggest you use a professional grade tool like Burndy PAT46-18V 15 ton hydraulic with Burndy lead plated compression terminals, and a NO-OX-ID A Special grease to lightly coat the conductors and mating surfaces. You can rent the tool for a day or two from an electrical supply house. Using the tools and components listed is the best you can get and will last for 30 years or more. When properly terminated the connection resistance will be less than 10 micro-ohms and the compression terminal will be stronger than the cable it is bonded too. No other method can match it.
 
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