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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys I'm a bit of a noob here, hi my name is Shaun btw.

I have a question about battery size.

This is in regards to an old 79 2wd f100, would there be any possible down sides to fitting 1 or 2 massive TS-LYP7000AHC thunder sky 7000ah batteries? I just thought it might make sense to fit one massive battery instead of lots of smaller ones.....

Here is a link to the battery specs

http://www.thunder-sky.com/pdf/2010723133950.pdf

Thanks for any replies
-shaun
 

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Yes, the downside is that you aren't going to find a motor that is going to run on a 3.2 or 6.4 volt system and produce power in a fashion that is practical. The motors and controllers don't exist. I can't imagine what kind of wiring you would need to push thousands of amps continuously to produce any usable power if there was such a system.

72volts is about as low as most people who want to run a low voltage system will go. There is one guy who has a 48v AC system that seems to provide a decent amount of motor RPM but it's kw output is small and therefore not a very powerful system for anything but the absolute lightest of vehicles. If you are planning a series DC motor and want highway speeds you'd want something in the 45 cell or so range. With an AC system there are many satisfied with 35 or 36 100 to 200Ah cells depending on required range and get enough power to the point where I think its plenty reasonable for a car that isn't heavier than most conversions if the aerodynamics isn't too bad.
 

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This is in regards to an old 79 2wd f100, would there be any possible down sides to fitting 1 or 2 massive TS-LYP7000AHC thunder sky 7000ah batteries?
Hi shaun,

In theory I guess it would work. But where are you going to find a 3 or 6 volt motor powerful for a truck? And then a 20,000 ampere controller? And the cable size would be huge.

Those Thundersky products are cells. A cell of this sort is 3.2 volts nominal. A battery consists of one or more cells. When those cells are in series, the voltage adds. Most EV batteries are 100 to 300 volts, so need like 30 to 100 cells. This is because the propulsion systems require this voltage.

It would be cool to use a single cell battery :cool: BMS not required. Just not going to happen with EVs.

major
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the comments guys, fairly obvious i need to do more research lol.
all these batteries get expensive when you start adding them up....
 

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Hmm, I have often thought not needing a BMS would be cool, I wonder how well a capacitor voltage transformer would work?

Charge em all parallel to 3.2 volts then controller switch to series for a voltage jump.

LoL
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hmm, I have often thought not needing a BMS would be cool, I wonder how well a capacitor voltage transformer would work?

Charge em all parallel to 3.2 volts then controller switch to series for a voltage jump.

LoL
Sorry my electrical knowledge is limited but that sounds kinda cool, would discharge rate be the same regardless of drawing or loading capacitors??

What if you had multiple banks of capacitors which switched to a series setup when fully loaded circulating?

Talking out of my ass a bit but food for thought....
 

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Sorry my electrical knowledge is limited but that sounds kinda cool, would discharge rate be the same regardless of drawing or loading capacitors??

What if you had multiple banks of capacitors which switched to a series setup when fully loaded circulating?

Talking out of my ass a bit but food for thought....
That was a LoL, I was talking out of my arse. Not sure how you would rig up a set of massive caps that could handle hundreds of amps in a series parallel setup to multiply 4000amps of 3.2v into 200amps at 64v

Contactors wouldn't last very long that way and you would need lots of them. :)
 
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