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Discussion Starter #1
I've been thinking about using Belleville washers at the standard connection points and got wondering about why Belleville - why not a standard lock washer. Isn't the basic principle the same with any type of locking washer: exploit the elasticity of steel to maintain constant pressure on a bolt? Any comments or opinions (talk about a loaded question!!) ? :)

TIA





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Discussion Starter #2
Belleville washers work great. You can calibrate the compression force.
The force is more even over a greater distance than a split lock. You can
stack the belleville's for either more force or more travel distance, or
both. Belleville's don't wreck the mating surfaces like split locks. I
like belleville's for aluminum bus bar where cold flow is a possibility. I
can't think of any disadvantages.





On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 05:05:28 -0700 (PDT), Frank John wrote
> I've been thinking about using Belleville washers at the standard
> connection points and got wondering about why Belleville - why not a
> standard lock washer. Isn't the basic principle the same with any
> type of locking washer: exploit the elasticity of steel to maintain
> constant pressure on a bolt? Any comments or opinions (talk about a
> loaded question!!) ? :)
>
> TIA
>
>
_____________________________________________________________________________
_______
> Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
> http://searchmarketing.yahoo.com/
 

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Discussion Starter #3
A normal lock washer is not use for pressure. It is simply used to dig into
the nut to keep it from loosening. A belleville washer IS used to create
pressure on the assembly. Does it have enough pressure to help maintain the
connection? I gues it wouldn't hurt.
Mark



----- Original Message -----
From: "Frank John" <[email protected]>
To: <[email protected]>
Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2007 8:05 AM
Subject: Belleville (or other) washers


> I've been thinking about using Belleville washers at the standard
> connection points and got wondering about why Belleville - why not a
> standard lock washer. Isn't the basic principle the same with any type of
> locking washer: exploit the elasticity of steel to maintain constant
> pressure on a bolt? Any comments or opinions (talk about a loaded
> question!!) ? :)
>
> TIA
>
>
>
>
>
> ____________________________________________________________________________________
> Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
> http://searchmarketing.yahoo.com/
>
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hello Frank,

I may have use Belleville washers if you can get them in the correct torque
rate and if the local fastener company had them in high temper stainless
steel. Did not what to use standard Gal-Chrome color ones, the same plating
that the grade 8 bolts have. This type of plating will corrode faster than
the normal plated fastener.

The standard torque rate for Belleville are the same as for the bolt size
you are using. A 5/16 standard bolt is about 15 ft lbs, a 3/8 standard bolt
is about 35 ft lbs, which is way too much force on a battery stud. If you
less torque on a Belleville washer is rated for, than it may be less
effected than a high temper lock washer.

Stainless steel is a good corrosion resistance, but do use stainless steel
between a battery post and the cable connection, only on the nut side.

I use a torque wrench anyway in installing the battery connectors. A
Belleville washer has a set amount of torque in them. We use them in
bolting high power electrical buss bars together. The technician turns a
1/2 double head bolt with a Belleville washer until the top head shears off,
which is about 50 ft lbs of force. It takes a bit of force to flatten them
down. So I did not like to use them on battery studs, because I had pull
out studs only at 75 in lbs which is about the same a 6+ ft lbs.

Roland


----- Original Message -----
From: "Frank John" <[email protected]>
To: <[email protected]>
Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2007 6:05 AM
Subject: Belleville (or other) washers


> I've been thinking about using Belleville washers at the standard
> connection points and got wondering about why Belleville - why not a
> standard lock washer. Isn't the basic principle the same with any type of
> locking washer: exploit the elasticity of steel to maintain constant
> pressure on a bolt? Any comments or opinions (talk about a loaded
> question!!) ? :)
>
> TIA
>
>
>
>
>
> ____________________________________________________________________________________
> Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
> http://searchmarketing.yahoo.com/
>
>
 
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