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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Borg Warner Egeardrive 31-03 8.28/1 - pictures of internals - how to lock the diff

I have two sets of siemens motor + DMOC645 + Borg Warner Egeardrive 31-03 8.28/1 gearboxes.
As I want to use those sets in my boat, I have to lock the differentials so I can get all power into one axle (to the prop-shaft)

I made some pictures of the inside of the gearbox, for all pictures see:
http://boekel.nu/foto/14/2014-08_borg_warner_egeardrive_31-03/





The parking brake, I think I can live without it ;)


the insides...


Parking brake in action.


Size comparison (30cl bottle)


The differential.


close up, gears aren't machined.


How to lock up this thing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
A couple welds in those crown gears would do you.
I don't really like the idea...unless I'm convinced it won't produce long term problems (welding material that's not made te be welded...). Any breakouts could destroy the whole gearbox :(


I'm open for alternatives, a straight though (rwd) gearbox would be perfect.

But as I already own these packages and they fit together so nice...;)

Even more ideal would be a way to fit both motors to one axle with at leas 7x reduction, for now I'm planning on just putting two sets behind each other, one driving the second one, the second one driving the propshaft.
(two propshafts would be ideal...but that's a lot of extra work as my boat only has one prop at the moment)



 

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+1 on what Roy said. You could get a splined stub shaft and weld/bolt it to a flange plate, then use the tapped holes in the housing to lock the flange in place.

That must be some special metal for casting the spider gears in that diff--or they forgot to grind the teeth...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If this is an open rear end, if you lock one side, only the other side will turn.


Roy
Yes but how to lock one side...also the force on the gears will double (but they won't turn so shouldn't be a problem?)

What a beautiful vessel , very efficient . How long and tonnage ?
What size prop and shaft .
There is some old gear boxes used on GM 671's , where 2 or more engines have 1 output.
26,4 meters, about 70 tonnes atm. shaft...think it's 65mm, prop 32x??(18?)
Thanks!

+1 on what Roy said. You could get a splined stub shaft and weld/bolt it to a flange plate, then use the tapped holes in the housing to lock the flange in place.
I don't understand, lock it to the outside? then I only have half the reduction and the spidergears will be worn in no time.
That must be some special metal for casting the spider gears in that diff--or they forgot to grind the teeth...
cast or sintered I think, I'd rather not weld on it to be sure.


I think I'll draw a completely new hub to replace the diff, see what the cost will be, than I can also use a thicker axle...to be continued!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I love the shear line (top of ladder touches) and rounded bilges (vertical meets bottom). How much draft? Whats the history?
I think thats to small a gear box. Maybe for a bow thruster it would be ok.
I'll make a seperate topic someday :) in Dutch you can read (or watch the pictures) here:
http://www.machinekamer.nl/forum3/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=74

I agree the gearbox is not too big, but I just measured I can use a solid 40mm axle as an output axle, that would give some more strength, and this gearbox is quite 'beefier' than something like a PRM gearbox for a 80hp diesel engine.

And a 8 to 1 gear ratio is hard to find!
 

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I'll make a seperate topic someday :) in Dutch you can read (or watch the pictures) here:
http://www.machinekamer.nl/forum3/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=74

I agree the gearbox is not too big, but I just measured I can use a solid 40mm axle as an output axle, that would give some more strength, and this gearbox is quite 'beefier' than something like a PRM gearbox for a 80hp diesel engine.

And a 8 to 1 gear ratio is hard to find!

I'm not an expert on marine conversions, but it seems that an 8:1 gear ratio is not right. In order to mimic the combustion engine, one would think it should be a 2:1 ratio, to reduce the high rpms to what a diesel or gasoline engine would produce, which would also simplify the selection of propeller to use.

I'm of course talking about using an ac motor.

At 8:1 the prop would have to have a large diameter and pitch.

Contact this company, they have the experience and know how to give you some advice....

http://newelectric.nl/



Roy
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I'm not an expert on marine conversions, but it seems that an 8:1 gear ratio is not right. In order to mimic the combustion engine, one would think it should be a 2:1 ratio, to reduce the high rpms to what a diesel or gasoline engine would produce, which would also simplify the selection of propeller to use.

I'm of course talking about using an ac motor.

At 8:1 the prop would have to have a large diameter and pitch.

Contact this company, they have the experience and know how to give you some advice....

http://newelectric.nl/

Roy
This is the original engine:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EgD4MrqUoLQ

The current (also AC) motor does max. 650 RPM (+- 60 kW), it's to fast for the propellor (it's a 6 pole motor, should do 1000 RPM), I want to increase the pitch to get the max speed under 500 RPM (at +/- 100 kW).

The siemens 5135-4WS14-Z motor is happy up to 4000 RPM, with the 8,3/1 reduction that gives 480 rpm which is perfect for my application.

I like the lock-conversions some people posted, problem is this gearbox the drive axles fit directly into the gearbox (no 'long axles' in a fixed axle) so not easy to lengthen the splines.

I'll measure the diff after the weekend and get some quotes to fabricate things.
Hopefully I can use the existing diff-casing as a base, using a long axle going through, locked to the diff-casing.
 

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Hi
I think you are over-thinking
Simply take the drive-shaft you are not using and cut it to use it in reverse so that it goes across to join up with the shaft you are using,

You can simply use a pinned coupling to hold the two together,

Its a prop shaft so it should not see large impulsive loads unless you hit something, then replacing a pin could be a good way to save the rest of the system
 
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