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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

Seeking a little advice on how to go about a build. My goals might be a bit lofty. So feel free to ground me. (No pun intended) I'm currently in talks with someone about a 1991 Geo Storm with a blown motor. I would be able to trade a few items laying around for it. Also I might have a source for 16 or so hawker 12v92f batteries. I'm not certain of their true condition, but they were removed just last week from a cell tower upgrade. I know the deep cycles are heavy, but they're slimmer in design and should be easy to setup in series due to the terminal design.

Now to the goals. I have a interesting commute. The furthest commute is 45 miles one way. The first 10 miles are gentle rolling hills. The next 9 are steeper hills. The next 10 miles are four lane 60mph areas with stop lights. The hilly road area is also a 60mph area. The rest of the commute is stop and go urban traffic with slower road speeds. The travel home is the same, only in reverse. I also have the option at times to work 19 miles from home traversing that same hilly section. I would love to be able to commute to the main office though.

As far as motors go, I was thinking about a warp 9 motor. I was going to go with a clutcless setup. I was thinking about a 144 or 168 volt arrangement. Controller, I haven't decided on at all yet. Nor have I thought about the charging system. I'd have no problem setting up a 220V outlet at home to charge from, but I'd really need a charging option for 110v at work.

So is this at all possible? Or only with a better battery pack? I'd just love to be able to make all of this work. Especially if I have no real money in the car or batteries.
 

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I don't think you'll have enough amp-hr w/ the hawkers.... especially if they are used.

gotta go Lithium, and ballpark at 144v I would guess you'll need 160ah cells one-way and charge at work to have conservative DOD to maximize life of pack.

there are lots of chargers, even cheap Elcons, can take either 110v or 220v input.

you don't NEED to go wild on a high power/expensive controller... and a lower limit one like a curtis 1231 (500amp limit) will prevent you from over-taxing your cells. If you go with 160ah, then 3xC= 480, so a 500 amp limit is a good thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't think you'll have enough amp-hr w/ the hawkers.... especially if they are used.

gotta go Lithium, and ballpark at 144v I would guess you'll need 160ah cells one-way and charge at work to have conservative DOD to maximize life of pack.

there are lots of chargers, even cheap Elcons, can take either 110v or 220v input.

you don't NEED to go wild on a high power/expensive controller... and a lower limit one like a curtis 1231 (500amp limit) will prevent you from over-taxing your cells. If you go with 160ah, then 3xC= 480, so a 500 amp limit is a good thing.
I'm not sure of the condition of the Hawkers, I know they'd have been used for a "UPS" system at a cell tower. Basically in float until commercial power was lost, then keep the 48V systems running until the backup gensets come online. If I can get them free, that's why I was considering the project.

Would the 20 mile distance be any more feasible with the hawker batts?
 

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I'm not sure of the condition of the Hawkers, I know they'd have been used for a "UPS" system at a cell tower. Basically in float until commercial power was lost, then keep the 48V systems running until the backup gensets come online. If I can get them free, that's why I was considering the project.
free is good, but unless you know what kind of capacity they have, it would be a shame to build a conversion and not get the range you need. If you can get a couple, or a pack's worth and TEST them first, it might settle some questions.

you'll need some way to apply a load to take them down to nominal voltage, then a power supply to charge them back up with something like a kill-a-watt meter at the outlet to show how many kWhr go in.

or perhaps somebody else has a better way for you to test the actual capacity...

Would the 20 mile distance be any more feasible with the hawker batts?
20 miles is very do-able on lead if the batteries are in good shape. In my suzuki swift with 12 x 8v (96v system) golf cart floodies I had about 10kWhr of usable energy (at 1hr EV discharge rate); this got me about 35 miles max when new.... but dropped to about 20 miles after 18 months of daily use.

my newly upgrade pack is 120v worth of 100ah LiFePO4, and I could easily go 45 miles without too much worry... and the car performs WAY better, and weighs a good 500# less than with the lower capacity lead.
 

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You need to run the numbers through the calculator at this site.
http://www.evconvert.com/tools/evcalc/

It does not have your exact battery, but it does have the PC2150 that is 100ah battery and that is close to your 92ah battery. My guess is that you will need more or better batteries, but run the numbers to find out.

KJD

Hello all,

Now to the goals. I have a interesting commute. The furthest commute is 45 miles one way. The first 10 miles are gentle rolling hills. The next 9 are steeper hills. The next 10 miles are four lane 60mph areas with stop lights. The hilly road area is also a 60mph area. The rest of the commute is stop and go urban traffic with slower road speeds. The travel home is the same, only in reverse. I also have the option at times to work 19 miles from home traversing that same hilly section. I would love to be able to commute to the main office though.
 
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