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Hello everyone! I’m new hear and was hoping to get abit of help. My son has a Ford ranger 12 volt electric car with 2 motors. The battery on it kept dying so I swapped it for a 26 amp/hour 12 volt battery and also swapped the 2 motors for a identical but higher rpm ones (12000 sapped to 30000). After putting it all together, ising the controller I sent it up a hill. After a couple of seconds it cut out and the circuit board was smoking so I stopped and turned it off. I then checked all the wiring and tried it again with the same result.

Any ideas what I’m doinng wrong??

Thank you in advance!
 

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If voltage is the same but current draw is higher, you can overload your controller.

Once the smoke comes out, you can never put it back in...
 

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Thank you very much for your reply. Nothing seems to be damaged as I turned it off straight away and all turned back in a few minutes later. Just to confirm, it’s nothing at all to do with the larger battery correct?
Is there anything around this problem or will I have to put the old motors back in?
Is there anything I can do to give it a little bit more torque?
 

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Thank you very much for your reply. Nothing seems to be damaged as I turned it off straight away and all turned back in a few minutes later. Just to confirm, it’s nothing at all to do with the larger battery correct?
Is there anything around this problem or will I have to put the old motors back in?
I'm not one of the more knowledgeable experts here, but if they are DC motors then voltage is what determines their safe operation, while Amp Hours (the size of the pack) determines how long you can run the motor without recharging.

Any time you get smoke you are damaging something. It may not die right away, and it is even possible that if you turn it off quick enough it will still function for a normal lifetime - but that depends on how lucky you are.

Is there anything I can do to give it a little bit more torque?
Of course. Get a new controller matched to the bigger motor(s). Almost anything is possible given enough budget. Whether it is worth the money is a question you have to decide for yourself. That's why it's called "experimental."
 
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