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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I took the motor out of the Yugo this afternoon and the pictures show the results of the $50.00 connector.
The sprocket on the motor had to be pulled off with a gear puller, The key, 2 set screws and a little lock-tite worked fine.

The sprockets were mild steel and I ordered hardened ones for the replacements. I figure using the trans for reverse kept the hub from being subjected to reverse torque.

The chain showed no major wear. The sprockets are wrapped with a 16 link chain. The same idea is used on some old farm tractors to turn the shaft from the engine to the trans.

The clutch center that is welded to the second sprocket shows no wear also.
I will machine off the worn sprocket and weld on a new one.
The motor brushes are good and the commutator shows no wear. The input shaft to the transaxle shows no wear.

$48.00 in parts and it will be ready to put back in the car. Not bad....
 

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Hi Coley,

One word of advise. When welding on hardened sprockets of smaller diameters like yours, you will soften them from the heat of the welding. You should take some precautions. You could preheat, and bury them in vermiculite or if you know someone with an oven. You must slow down the cooling significantly. Sometimes items without much mass are harder to control without an oven.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Gotcha, yep good advice. The shop that welds them for me has an oven and specialise in this type of work.

I have the clutch disc hub machined and waiting on the sprockets.

With the batteries inside the car, now, they should think it is spring!!

Deka Gels, no fumes, no watering, no mess....
 

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Hi, looking through old posts and saw this. For many years I have run the same sprockets on my kerb and channel machines.With a full hopper of concrete plus machine weight they can go over a ton. The only time I ever encountered wear like that was because of mis-alignment.Normal wear is consistently even on all teeth when aligned correctly. Is it possible that there is flexing of your mountings under full load? I am in the process of doing similar with my old 36v electro dynamics motor, (previously 36V Hillman; Lseries subaru). At present the motor is mounted in series with ICE on the Toyota Dyna 150 gearbox with a shortened tailshaft. 40kmh top speed for 4km; 6-7ks overall. I intend to offset the motor and connect to a 26T on the rear of the gearbox with 15T on the motor. I am hoping for 75kmh as it is supposed to be more efficient at high rpm. Thanks
 

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Hi, looking through old posts and saw this. For many years I have run the same sprockets on my kerb and channel machines.With a full hopper of concrete plus machine weight they can go over a ton. The only time I ever encountered wear like that was because of mis-alignment.Normal wear is consistently even on all teeth when aligned correctly. Is it possible that there is flexing of your mountings under full load? I am in the process of doing similar with my old 36v electro dynamics motor, (previously 36V Hillman; Lseries subaru). At present the motor is mounted in series with ICE on the Toyota Dyna 150 gearbox with a shortened tailshaft. 40kmh top speed for 4km; 6-7ks overall. I intend to offset the motor and connect to a 26T on the rear of the gearbox with 15T on the motor. I am hoping for 75kmh as it is supposed to be more efficient at high rpm. Thanks
I strongly suspect that temper was lost when welded. ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The wear was consistent. I cut off the two spots to be able to use a gear puller to get the sprocket off the motor.

One key with 2 set screws held really well.

Using a good chain lube now and more often.
 

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to DIY guy. Yes ,I see it now. Metal temper has been lost through welding. I will change my next idea to a bolted adaptor spacer rather than welding.
 

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I was wondering why not use a Lovejoy coupling or something like that? I know they work well but if not aligned right they too will die an early death. There was another coupling I recall using in my industrial days but can't recall the name. It had two cups with triangular like "teeth" around the outer edge basically that took the place of your sprockets and had a rubber like donut between them to transfer the motion.
 

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$48.00 in parts and it will be ready to put back in the car. Not bad....
Not bad? :eek: I'd say you were a few miles away from being stranded on the road. How many miles have do you have on that coupler? I'm not sure how any conclusion could be drawn other than these components not being up to the job. Lovejoys have also been tried in EV's and usually fail. Solid machined hubs and taper locks don't need maintenance or replacement when done properly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The sprocket on the clutch disc hub has the whole 13,200 miles on it. the motor was changed out at about 2000 and needed a larger hub.

The flat spots on the motor hub are where I had to grind off the teeth to get a pull with a 2 jaw puller.

Not too bad for almost 6 years of fun.:)
 
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