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I own a 1981 Z28 (350, 4bbl, nice ride back in the day) T-Tops, the whole High School Dream Machine Package. She's been sitting idle for years, but will start on real gasoline, so an experienced oldster like myself could keep the stock girl running just fine. I don't want to do that. The way I see it, I have possibly two options:

1) Yank the drivetrain and fuel system, and replace it with a modern crate motor, transmission and fuel system. Instant 2x+ of original horsepower, but still fundamentally the same vehicle.

2) Do an EV conversion either as a straight up plug in EV or as a hybrid with a smallish power plant to handle the drive and charge duties when I go over the plug in range.

The questions for you folks who are way more experienced in the EV conversion world are:
A) How well trodden is the conversion of a 2nd gen Camero?
B) Weight is the enemy of range and yanking the small block and all of its supporting cruft along with the transmission will help, but is it enough?
C) Is this a sane consideration or am I barking mad? (at least WRT this project)
D) While I'm at it, is it worth looking into modification of the suspension (both front and rear) to improve handling and/or deal with the new weight distribution?
E) Registration & Safety Inspections. What happens in those worlds typically in any US State when you do a conversion on a former gasoline (or diesel) vehicle? (Leave Cali out of the mix if they are as different in this aspect as they usually are in other regulatory issues.)
F) What am I not thinking about, but should?

Thanks in advance for your kind pointers, comments, tips, etc...

Cheers,
Mike
 

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in any US State when you do a conversion
I know Florida is famously lenient regarding car modification and inspection but I don't know whether this expends to EV conversions.

You should set the location on your profile so people avoid giving answers which are only correct for places irrelevant to you.
 

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The questions for you folks who are way more experienced in the EV conversion world are:
A) How well trodden is the conversion of a 2nd gen Camero?
B) Weight is the enemy of range and yanking the small block and all of its supporting cruft along with the transmission will help, but is it enough?
C) Is this a sane consideration or am I barking mad? (at least WRT this project)
D) While I'm at it, is it worth looking into modification of the suspension (both front and rear) to improve handling and/or deal with the new weight distribution?
E) Registration & Safety Inspections. What happens in those worlds typically in any US State when you do a conversion on a former gasoline (or diesel) vehicle? (Leave Cali out of the mix if they are as different in this aspect as they usually are in other regulatory issues.)
F) What am I not thinking about, but should?
A) You might be the first, though even if you're the tenth, the tech moves so quickly that no two installations seem to be the same.

B) Weight isn't a big range-killer, drag is (though this depends on speed as well as stop-and-goness). Final weight depends on range. Big ballpark is maybe 25 miles per 100 pounds of OEM battery (which runs maybe a grand for used OEM batteries...more for Tesla stuff).

C) You are barking mad, but we all are. Most don't seem to succeed, much like every other engine swap project you read about on the internet.

D) Modification probably isn't necessary, but it seems likely that you'd want a higher or lower spring rate, depending on the final corner weights...and dampers to match. You might be able to defer this until you're on the road.

E) It's state to state...Many don't care at all. Even California doesn't care besides smog, and EVs are exempt.

F) The cost of parts being in the neighborhood of $10k, though there are many ways to skin this cat. It depends on your goals (range, mostly).
 

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F) Insurance
Even if there is no problem getting government approval, you presumably need at least liability insurance (or maybe not in some states), and some forum members have had difficulty finding anyone to insure a conversion.
 
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