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NetGain sent me 2 Hyper 9's, but nothing to couple them together. They have 1 1/8" shafts. McMaster Carr and other sites have a variety of options. but I have no idea what's appropriate and I've gotten to response to an email and a phone call to EV asking for guidance. Can anyone here point me at a thread or threads about linking to EV motors together?
 

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I saw that one. It's $1,000 euros and there's no picture of what it actually is. I think it's a lot more than a coupler, but I can't tell. Plus, it's out of stock right now.

Also, could not find the kit on EV west, although considering what a disaster their web site is, I simply could have missed it.
 

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I saw that one. It's $1,000 euros and there's no picture of what it actually is. I think it's a lot more than a coupler, but I can't tell.
It appears to include an adapter housing (connecting the motor housings and holding them aligned) and a shaft coupler (with flexible element). It looks like everything you would need and a sound design, but a thousand euros does seem like a lot.

Switching the page to what they call "English" helps, but everything is in the images, too... once you figure out what you're looking at.
 

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It looks to me like a lot of people are taking advantage of a lot of other people, who get into a hobby they are not educated or experienced for. There are many shaft couplers, some flexible, some solid. Solid ones will put side thrust or radial loads on the motor's bearings if the motors are not kept perfectly aligned. The bearings won't last long that way. Flexible couplings are varied, from ones with rubber bushings to ones with chain connectors. Some have nice covers to keep the coupling lubricated, keep dirt out. Just knowing couplings is a minor part of what it takes to properly build and operate a powerful device. If you don't know the finer points of auto mechanics, fabrication, welding, electricity, and didn't get erector sets as a child, buy a finished EV vehicle.
 

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There are many shaft couplers, some flexible, some solid. Solid ones will put side thrust or radial loads on the motor's bearings if the motors are not kept perfectly aligned. The bearings won't last long that way. Flexible couplings are varied, from ones with rubber bushings to ones with chain connectors. Some have nice covers to keep the coupling lubricated, keep dirt out.
All true. Visually, the EV Europe kit mentioned earlier appears to include a jaw coupling, which makes sense to accommodate the minimal misalignment inherent in the rigid housing connection approach. The elastomeric spider (visible ends are yellow in the illustration) doesn't need any lubrication, and the housing will protect all components from dirt and moisture.
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It looks to me like a lot of people are taking advantage of a lot of other people, who get into a hobby they are not educated or experienced for.
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Just knowing couplings is a minor part of what it takes to properly build and operate a powerful device. If you don't know the finer points of auto mechanics, fabrication, welding, electricity, and didn't get erector sets as a child, buy a finished EV vehicle.
Or buy well-designed and well-constructed components to handle the aspects in which you are not proficient. Almost no one who converts a vehicle to an EV is educated and experienced in motor design, but that's okay because they can buy a suitable motor; shaft couplers and housing adapters are a fundamentally similar situation.
 

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All true. Visually, the EV Europe kit mentioned earlier appears to include a jaw coupling, which makes sense to accommodate the minimal misalignment inherent in the rigid housing connection approach. The elastomeric spider (visible ends are yellow in the illustration) doesn't need any lubrication, and the housing will protect all components from dirt and moisture.
View attachment 121853


Or buy well-designed and well-constructed components to handle the aspects in which you are not proficient. Almost no one who converts a vehicle to an EV is educated and experienced in motor design, but that's okay because they can buy a suitable motor; shaft couplers and housing adapters are a fundamentally similar situation.
I'd have to see the proposed setup. If the first motor is solidly adapted to the bellhousing, coupled to the tranny, the second motor is just hanging out there, suspended by whatever engineering the builder can come up with. Room for error there. If the first motor is solidly mounted in place of the tranny, a standard driveshaft connects to the rear end, and the second motor is still hanging out there, same problems. If my vehicle required two motors, I would look for two that had the torque and rpm range to mount directly to the rear wheels, no differential. Bang, straight in. Maybe independent rear suspension with driveshafts to each wheel to reduce un-sprung weight, if there's room.
 

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I'd have to see the proposed setup...
Do you mean the EV Europe kit? You can see it - just follow the link.

If my vehicle required two motors, I would look for two that had the torque and rpm range to mount directly to the rear wheels, no differential. Bang, straight in. Maybe independent rear suspension with driveshafts to each wheel to reduce un-sprung weight, if there's room.
I'm not a fan of tandem motors, either, and one-motor-per-wheel is a capable solution... but surely if you understand the motor technology at all you would use a reduction gear set with each motor, and just forgot to include it in your description.

In the context of this thread, we have no idea what the target vehicle is, or what powertrain configurations would fit or be suitable. I assume that it would be the Land Cruiser which was discussed in an earlier thread - converting that to independent suspension would be a complete change in the character of the vehicle, and retaining 4WD with the one-motor-per-wheel approach would require two more motors and replacement of the front axle as well. Four HyPer9's with reduction gearboxes would provide great capability, but is really not the project that the builder was proposing.
 

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The BEST solution is to throw away the wimpy Hyper9's and get a couple of 9 inch forklift motors

You want the double ended type - these will have a splined shaft at each end
Then you can use a simple double female splined adapter

Much better than the plane shaft with a keyway
 

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I'm still new to EVs, so I'm still trying to grasp the allure. This person is EV powering a four wheel drive vehicle. Presumably to go off road. My son loves mud dogging, I can get that. But to do it in a vehicle with electro-hydraulic devices to operate the power steering, electro pneumatic devices to operate the power brakes, slow charging batteries that are now being stressed by heavy performance demands, (have I forgotten anything?) all that can fail out in the boonies, where tow trucks may not even want to go. Just looking for grief, as far as I can see.
 

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... My son loves mud dogging, I can get that. But to do it in a vehicle with electro-hydraulic devices to operate the power steering, electro pneumatic devices to operate the power brakes, slow charging batteries that are now being stressed by heavy performance demands, (have I forgotten anything?) all that can fail out in the boonies, where tow trucks may not even want to go. Just looking for grief, as far as I can see.
It's not obvious that this vehicle would have either power-assisted steering or power-boosted brakes in its original form, but if it does there are various solutions for the conversion which can work very well. We could leave that discussion to when - and if - a question is asked.

The power-versus-speed characteristics of electric motors - especially a synchronous permanent magnet motor such as the HyPer9 - are desirable in off-road conditions, so there is interest in EVs from enthusiasts in this area. Obviously reliability is of more importance than it would be for, for instance, a track competition car.
 
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