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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, all. I recently acquired a couple of Ford Ranger Electrics (1998 and 1999, PbA and NiMH respectively). At first, I was under the impression that they were using the more common 1PV5135-4WS14; however, they are actually equipped with a 1PV5133-4WS20 motor. I haven't been able to find much in the way of actual specifications for the motor, and many of the numbers appear to be contradictory. At the very least, I've seen two different peak power output numbers listed (67 kW and 90 kW). The motors themselves are also listed as 250 V, which puts them between the 1PV5135-4WS14 (215 V and 215 A) and 1PV5135-4WS18 (300 V and 165 A), but I have no clue what the current rating for the 1PV5133-4WS20 is. Both Rangers are stock, so I'm assuming the controller is still the matching Ballard Power Systems A 312V67 MS, which I can't find any information on either, other than that it has a continuous power output rating of 67 kW, a 280 A rms continuous output, and a 385 V max input voltage.

I'm wondering if someone either knows the specs, has access to a resources that are not coming up on internet searches, or knows how to decrypt what the naming conventions mean. Initially, I misread the label thinking it was the 1PV5138-4WS20, which is a 500 V and 170 A motor, so I was thinking there might be a way of determining a little more about the 1PV5133-4WS20's construction and capabilities.

The reason why I'm asking is that I'm still in the process of sourcing batteries. At this point, I've narrowed down my choices to LiFePO4 or NCM batteries. I'm leaning toward the latter because NCM will maximize the kWh I can get per dollar, but because of the cell voltages, I'd need to run an 84s battery configuration to remain within specs on the A 312V67 MS controller. My preference would be to configure a 96s pack; however, because that would exceed the controller's input voltage, I might consider replacing the stock controller. But, it would have to be worth it (efficiency, power, etc.). It looks like the Ballard A 312V67 MS has a peak output of 90 kW, but if the 1PV5133-4WS20 motor can actually produce more power and an aftermarket 100+ kW controller was better/more efficient, it might be worth it to me to make the switch.
 

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Hi,
Depending on how much DIY you like you may be interested in the OpenInverter project, specifically the one aimed towards replacing the control board in the Ranger inverter. This allows greater-than-original control, as well as careful tuning in order to achieve original functionality.
Ford Ranger - OpenInverter

Even if you would prefer to retain the original controller there is still a good knowledge base about the Ranger and its components - at least one user has installed Tesla battery modules in their Ranger. This may require some modifications to keep the OEM monitoring systems happy.

-Isaac
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi,
Depending on how much DIY you like you may be interested in the OpenInverter project, specifically the one aimed towards replacing the control board in the Ranger inverter. This allows greater-than-original control, as well as careful tuning in order to achieve original functionality.
Ford Ranger - OpenInverter

Even if you would prefer to retain the original controller there is still a good knowledge base about the Ranger and its components - at least one user has installed Tesla battery modules in their Ranger. This may require some modifications to keep the OEM monitoring systems happy.

-Isaac
Sweet. Thanks for the link! Even if I keep the stock controller, that looks like a great resource with a lot of information.
 
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