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I was curious of thinking if it would be possible to double the voltage of a battery pack to reach the needs of a motor? I have a microwave transformer laying around and was curious if that could be used to do so? I was also considering a dishwasher pump motor to increase the voltage of the battery pack. A guy name Gerard Morin used one in a video and created such power form 2 18V packs.

https://youtu.be/zWcN4Ts-QU4
 

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I was curious of thinking if it would be possible to double the voltage of a battery pack to reach the needs of a motor? I have a microwave transformer laying around and was curious if that could be used to do so? I was also considering a dishwasher pump motor to increase the voltage of the battery pack. A guy name Gerard Morin used one in a video and created such power form 2 18V packs.

https://youtu.be/zWcN4Ts-QU4
Hi,

Transformers work with AC. Not DC. You can get them to work with pulsed DC, but that's not a reasonable approach for a DC motor & battery. And disregard Gerard Moron.
Regards,
major
 

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And disregard Gerard Moron.
At first I was thinking "Well that's unnecessarily dismissive..."

But then I went to his youtube videos and see that he's a conspiracy theorist talking about how OverUnity is possible and he's going to prove it. Free energy from magnets, etc.

Uhhh yeah. Completely disregard him. Even anything unrelated to that.
 

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I was curious of thinking if it would be possible to double the voltage of a battery pack to reach the needs of a motor?
The use of a transformer for this purpose in an EV is nonsense, as already explained.

On the other hand, doubling battery voltage to allow the use of a relatively low-voltage battery with a higher-voltage motor is not only possible, it is in production and on the road in the most common "electrified" cars in the world: the Toyota Prius. The Prius system has an electronic (not transformer) voltage doubling stage in front of the inverter. This allows Toyota to run the battery at a voltage which is reasonable for the relatively small NiMH battery used in their hybrids, which running the motor-generators at a higher voltage suited to the speed ranges involved.

While it works well for Toyota in their hybrids, there is little point in doing this in a battery-electric vehicle. A rational design involves selecting a suitable operating voltage range for the motor and controller (inverter), and simply configures the battery with the appropriate number of cells in series to reach that target voltage.
 
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