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There was Audi E-tron debut the last month:

https://www.engadget.com/2018/09/18/...uv-first-look/

Range not final but expecting 400km WLTP (which is around 600km NEDC and 220-250mi under EPA) off 95kwh battery. Seems to be on par with EQC.

Nothing really new other than subscription service on options (rent as needed) and integrated e-pedal into brake system (system automatically figure out if friction brakes need to come in or not).

Thoughts?
 

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Nothing really new other than subscription service on options (rent as needed) and integrated e-pedal into brake system (system automatically figure out if friction brakes need to come in or not).
I don't see how that's new - they all work that way: the brake pedal controls both regeneration and friction braking. The various other driver controls just adjust the balance between braking methods, and determine what happens when the accelerator pedal is lifted.

This vehicle does have an advantage (over most EVs) in regenerative braking because it is all-wheel-drive only, so braking effort can distributed appropriately between front and rear. It's not unique even in that respect, since Tesla and Jaguar both sell AWD models.


A problem with sources such as Engadget is that they are not for automotive enthusiasts and not written by anyone with a substantial interest in or significant knowledge of cars, so they describe common features as if they are novel. Someone reading this article with no knowledge of regenerative braking would think that Audi invented it. :eek: I don't think this author (whose interests are "tech" - meaning electronic toys - and cats) has even heard of the term "regenerative braking". :D He even makes the obvious error of confusing power with energy... saying that "Owners will get 1,000kW of free charging", instead of 1,000 kWh.
 
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