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Hello! I'm new to this world, and don't even know where to start so I appreciate any help or advice I can get.

I got an electric go kart for my kid a few months ago, and it's been one problem after another. First the throttle broke, and after waiting a month for a replacement, it worked fine for a day. Then we had the latest problem. I'm hoping if I describe the problem, someone here might be able to give some advice. Then my kid comes telling me that the motor is stopping while he's driving it. I went to watch him and while the pedal is down, the motor just stops randomly. He let the go kart roll to a stop, pressed the pedal and it moves again, then the motor stops again: and repeat. I lifted the back end up so we could test it out without it moving. When I first pushed the pedal the wheels started spinning, then it slowed down to next-to-nothing speed, then it just died. I tried again just now and it is just dead. The battery is charged, all lights on, switches in the right position, etc. The dealer where I bought it from said to have the batteries tested, which I did and they are apparently fine.

Must be a motor issue?

Thanks in advance for any advice!
 

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TaoTao EK80 electric go kart specs from online search:

800W motor / 48V 12A-Hr battery.

So the electrical current draw will be 800/48 = 17Amps.

The battery is likely a lead-acid variety, so it will operate one time for about 12/17 = 0.7 hrs, or 45 minutes, until the energy is completely consumed. But such a drainage will shorten the life or damage the battery and is not recommended for lead batteries if more than one usage is desired.

You would want to limit the operation time to much less than this to extend battery life, for example 10 to 12 minutes after a Full charging session.

The battery is likely weak, worn out or damaged and will no longer hold up under load.
 

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You should be measuring the battery voltage when the motor dies. Is the voltage close to 48V or does it go way down? If it remains close to 48 then that means your problem is most likely in the controller circuitry. Is the controller box getting too hot? Overheating will cause a similar problem. If it is the controller I would demand a new one from the dealer. If that one does the same thing it is a bad design and you should search for something more rugged. It could be the motor but that is least likely. Does the motor turn freely right after it quits? Is it overheating?
 
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