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Why do electric cars use wider tires with low profile?

I know wider tires with low profile leads to better handling and they can transmit power but it also compromises rider comfort.

I addition it also leads to increase in rolling resistance which hampers range.

Hence the question
 

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The 2015 Nissan Leaf used the same exact size tires as our 2013 Mazda 3. Which is why they are now on the Mazda 3 after scrounging everything else I wanted off the the Leaf.


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I addition it also leads to increase in rolling resistance which hampers range.

Hence the question
There is actually some debate when it comes to wider tire and fuel economy. The ecomodder forum goes into this more if you are interested. I just use the tire that fits best, and then go for the one that has the higher mileage warranty so that it is a little harder compound.
 

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Why do electric cars use wider tires with low profile?

I know wider tires with low profile leads to better handling and they can transmit power but it also compromises rider comfort.

I addition it also leads to increase in rolling resistance which hampers range.
Wider tires generally lead to higher drag, but low profile generally leads to lower drag. You are lumping the two characteristics together.

Good EVs do tend to use low-profile tires, even compared to other modern cars (which have all gone very low-profile compared to a few decades ago); they do that for low drag, and because they are usually much more expensive than otherwise comparable non-EV models (so some "premium" features such as lower-profile tires are expected).

EVs don't tend to use wide tires, for their vehicle type and weight. The BMW i3 is a good example, with tire sizes that are extremely narrow: only 155 mm front and 175 mm rear, which is narrower than a typical cheap econobox.
 

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Why do electric cars use wider tires with low profile?
They dont !.....you have been misinformed !
Other than for high performance cars , the selection of tyre size, width and profile, for the average daily driver , is mostly a marketing (fashion) decision.
 

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Many seem to use bigger rims than you would expect, my Volt has 17” Rims, my other vehicles (even the Suburban) use 15” wheels.

I rather roll on 15’s

Ah well
 

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Many seem to use bigger rims than you would expect, my Volt has 17” Rims, my other vehicles (even the Suburban) use 15” wheels.
It would have to be a very old Suburban to have 15" wheels; only 17", 18", 20" and 22" are available for them now, and 20" might be the most common - only a cheap fleet unit would have 17". Larger wheels, and lower profile tires but still larger overall tire diameter, have been the trend of the last few decades.

The Volt is a plug-in hybrid Cruze. In the U.S. market, the Cruze comes with 15", 16", 17", or 18" wheels depending on trim level, with tires up to 225 mm wide. The Volt only comes in a high trim level and with 17" wheels. The Volt tires are the 215/50R17 size which is very common in compact cars (and is the mid-range choice for the Cruze, and is the premium size of two available for the 2013 Leaf), and are of the low rolling resistance type.

So in this case, the hybrid gets one of the regular sizes (despite higher weight), does not get the widest choice (too much drag), and gets low-rolling-resistance tires (which the regular car does not).
 
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