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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey guys, I purchased a '96 G16E about a week ago and have been slowly taking it apart and rebuilding it get it into working shape.

I took it out the other day and after hitting a large bump I think I ended up giving it enough shock to break the connection between the lug on the motor and the coil inside the motor.

See attachments for images

I tore apart the entire motor and everything looks pretty good, brushes are in good shape, just need to repair the connection to the lug:

See attachments for images

My first guess is that the inside of the motor will be getting very hot, and as such my first assumption was that using solder would not be a good idea (you can see some I was testing with in the pictures that will be removed).

Can anybody please help me with figuring out a way to make this connection so I can go ahead and finish rebuilding the motor? I don't have a welder (mig or any other) but i'm not apposed to buying one (this is how I get all my new toys!) .... but that also means needing gloves, mask, and I was hoping to find another way to do this.

Thanks everyone for your help in advance!
 

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It looks like they just spot welded a plain hex bolt to the junction and it didn't hold, either due to vibration or due to excessive torque on the exposed end while connecting cables. How cheap and cheesy can they get trying to save a few ¢ to make a buck...

One way to fix it might be to crimp a terminal lug to the wire and then run the bolt thru the lug and insulator to the outside, then use a flat washer and lock washer under a jam nut to hold the 'terminal'(bolt) in place and resist twisting during cable install. Just like as in air conditioning cap nuts, two wrenches should be used when attaching a cable lug on the outside--one to tighten the nut, the other to hold the jam nut.
 

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1,498 Posts
It looks like they just spot welded a plain hex bolt to the junction and it didn't hold, maybe an insufficient weld penetration that failed either due to vibration or due to excessive torque on the exposed end while connecting cables. How cheap and cheesy can they get trying to save a few ¢ to make a buck...

One way to fix it might be to crimp a terminal lug to the wire and then run the bolt thru the lug and insulator to the outside, then use a flat washer and lock washer under a jam nut to hold the 'terminal'(bolt) in place and resist twisting during cable install. Just like as in air conditioning cap nuts, two wrenches should be used when attaching a cable lug on the outside--one to tighten the nut, the other to hold the jam nut.
 
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