DIY Electric Car Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone. This is not only my first time taking on an EV project, but also my first time writing a blog. Ok enough of that stuff.

Oh by the way PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE feel free to share you experiences, and suggestions, concerning my project.

Here's the project and the plan. I have an 2004 Suzuki quadrunner (Z250 is anyone cares) It's a rolling chassis only. Motor was lost long ago. My plan is to convert this ride into an EV. 36/48 volt. I am leaning towards a golf cart or forklift motor. My wife has MS (Multiple Sclerosis), but truly enjoys being in the out doors with me. She love to hunt, and fish, but as her decease has progressed it has become increasingly more difficult for her to take part in these activities. My first attempt at building her an off-road vehicle was adding larger tires for ground clearance to an older Invacare Flyer handicap scooter. This is a 24 volt system, and made for flat, hard surfaces. Though it works fairly well on hard packed services, even mild hills. It totally lacks torque, and once you leave even packed dirt for grass it loses power. Obviously the gearing in the transaxle is totally wrong. So I write that one up to lessons learned.

The quadrunner has been stripped of everything ICE, and I have retained what electrical will be needed for lights etc.

The first thing that causes me to stand back and wonder if this is even possible with the quadrunner has a platform is that it is shaft driven (13 spline) I was lucky enough to save the driveshaft from the junkyard.

All the Golf cart motors I have been finding on the net are either 10 or 19 spline. My first question is. Should I abandon the drive shaft setup right out of the gate? Should I look for a straight axle with chain conversion? I have the resources to create an adapter to convert the 13 spine either up or down to match a golf cart motor.

As with everyone out there these days I would like to build this as economically as possible. But the cost of a motor and controller is going to be the biggest expense.

Golf cart motor ?

Forklift motor?

Ok well I think this is enough for a first time blogger. I will be back soon as things progress, and of course pics will follow.

Look forward to hearing from those more experienced than I in this type of project.

Grizz....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
Dear Grizz,
There are two overall issues that I suggest you address before "trying things out." First, is to make a project plan so that you have a framework for your effort (capabilities desired, specifications, approach, budget, and schedule). Second, I suggest that you look for a supplier that has as complete a kit as possible. This may cost a little more in funds but will save a lot of time and will give you some backup if and when problems occur. There are kits that include motor, controller, throttle, charger, and dc-dc convertor,and battery monitor. If you go that way, the remaining work is primarily mechanical mounting. One of the key issues after that is the programming of the controller, which has to do with performance, smoothness and safety. Since it sounds like you want to get your wife into the vehicle asap, you probably don't want to take a year getting this all together. Also, after creating your project plan, you may find that you just want to go on craigslist or ebay and get a low cost, used gas vehicle. The plus side of an electric vehicle is: quiet, and programmability for performance. Electric motors will do whatever you want, including a combination of high torque and hi/low speed ranges. The negative side is the cost of batteries, the strict need to use and maintain them properly, and the relatively short range. As a DIY project, it is critical to understand the electrical aspects that affect your safety in working on and using the vehicle. It is definitely not a "quick and dirty solution" to replacing a failed gas motor. If you want to make this a learning experience, then it can be very satisfying. If you rush it, it can be catastrophic. Just for fun, you might look up a Polaris dealership and take a look at their new electric models. They are extremely well done but pricey. You can see how they handled the battery packs, controller mounting, wiring harnesses and controls.
FYI, I am a retired aerospace engineer that rebuilt a Bombardier golf cart out of necessity when the factory no longer supported it. I didn't do it to save money, and probably wouldn't do it again, but I got to use all of my skills. I replaced, or modified all of the items that I listed above, including the charger. I also added automatic watering and a battery pack saving system. It is kind of a case of "I was smart enough to do it, but not wise enough to not do it." BTW, you are looking at about $3000; which is why I suggested considering a used gas vehicle. On the other hand, if you are looking into electric vehicles as a hobby, this is as good a start as any.
Yours,
Daryl
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
hi Grizz

Are you still working on this project? Anything new? The following company also makes electric outdoor vehicles, for parts or ideas:

http://www.badboybuggies.com/

Regarding the splines and other technical details, it would help to post pictures so people can visualize what you're doing. Unfortunately this is an older-style forum where you have to post the picture on a website first. Here is a link to some Suzuki quad photos. Keep us up to date!

http://picsbox.biz/key/250%20suzuki%20quad
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top