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Discussion Starter #1
A while back I was looking into building an electric vehicle and had wild expectations of how simple it would be. While the overview of an EV is quite simple, for someone who has never actually built one it is a task and then some.
That being said, I have come across a couple of motors that appear to have the grunt to do the deed. In their previous existence they were used for moving elevators at a mall.
Fortunately, they came with four regen controllers and what appears to be a control panel. The motors are rated on the tags at 29 hp and 35 hp. One glaring issue is motor speed. To be specific, they are rated at 822 rpm (ratings are for one hour duty cycle, I believe). I have one other issue to deal with, and that would be weight. the motors came with the traction assemblies intact for moving elevators and they weigh 810 lbs each as is. I estimate the traction assembly to be about 350+ lbs. That leaves me with one heck of a heavy motor. Actually TWO heavy motors.
Granted, I was planning to use them in a truck, at this point the likely candidate is a 92 F-150 long box standard cab rwd pickup. It might end up being a different truck, but it will definitely be a 87-96 F-series truck. My requirements are very modest. The truck will be driven on mostly flat ground, typically 10 - 20 miles all stop and go from one shop to another. Almost all day at under 40 mph, occasionally with heavy loads (up to 3000 lbs, but mostly around 2000 lbs max), but I drive slower with a load on board anyways. The only uphill grades I will encounter have about 3/4 mile lead in on level ground, so I have a running start for these two half mile long hills.
Any thoughts about these behemoths?
 

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... they are rated at 822 rpm...
Wow... an 8-pole motor? The synchronous speed at 60 Hz would be 900 rpm, so If my guess it right presumably these are induction motors that slip to 822 rpm when fed 60 Hz (at some voltage which should be on the placard) at rated load.

the motors came with the traction assemblies intact for moving elevators and they weigh 810 lbs each as is. I estimate the traction assembly to be about 350+ lbs. That leaves me with one heck of a heavy motor.
I find it hard to believe that any motor could be worth carrying that much mass, even though it would presumably not need any additional reduction gearing beyond that in the final drive (axle).
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Apparently you already know more about my motors than I do. I am about to look up "eight pole motor" on Google in a few minutes. If you mean the final drive ratio, the differential in the F-150 is approximately 3.2:1 as I recall. Not sure what I will do about that yet, but I can guarantee it will be VERY inexpensive. Because I don't have a lot of money. lol
Quite likely I will put an old top loader three speed facing backwards u-joint to u-joint on the back of the truck's current five speed. Just have to figure out how to mate a shortened driveshaft to the splines of the "input" shaft.
I could be wrong about the weight of the traction section, but I am usually quite accurate at such things.
Although in this case I hope I am WAY off the target.
A rather interesting sideline to this, the assemblies both had a disc brake attached to them, but the disc has the friction material for braking, just like a clutch. I might try to use them like a trans brake.
The total weight is pretty much a given, seeing as it is printed on both tags and remembering getting them up to the deck of my utility trailer MANUALLY with a friend, two ratchet straps, and a half dozen pallets only reinforces the veracity of the printed statement. Took us around two hours of swearing. (trailer was a tar kettle originally, handled the weight brilliantly)
 

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Hi
How old are these motors?
I believe that they used to use DC motors for elevators - in which case you could have two "forklift" motors in that assembly - which would probably be quite good in that application

Take some pictures!
If they have brushes then they are DC motors - then you need to see if they are "Serial" wound - get some pictures of the field coil windings

If they are AC - no brushes then they are probably not worth messing with
 

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If you mean the final drive ratio, the differential in the F-150 is approximately 3.2:1 as I recall. Not sure what I will do about that yet...
It's not clear that you will need to do anything about that, because you don't know yet what the operating speed of the motor should be (in the truck application), so you don't know what gearing is needed.

Quite likely I will put an old top loader three speed facing backwards u-joint to u-joint on the back of the truck's current five speed. Just have to figure out how to mate a shortened driveshaft to the splines of the "input" shaft.
The current transmission steps the motor speed up or (mildly) down, and the backwards 3-speed would step the speed back up again. Are you thinking that you need to use both transmissions to step up shaft speed? There must be another way to do that, even cheaply, and the overall gearing requirement isn't known yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I will gt some pictures of the motors and attempt to post them. As far as I know, they are 3 phase, 40 volts? That does not make sense eve to a noob like myself.
Time to do some research.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Here's the specs;
AC 3 phase
510 volts
Class F
Time rating one hour
54.8 Hz
140 starts /hour
45c Ambient
50% ED
26 Kw output
30 amps
822 RPM
35HP
Manufactured by Kollmorgen
At the top it has
Machrat: 5.2T-58x1

So, if they are of no use to my vehicular machinations, where would they be well received and therefore possibly traded for something better suited to my goals.
What else could they be used for to either trade or sell to get the unit(s) I actually need?
 
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