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Hi,

I'm contemplating an EV conversion on a late 70's / early 80's 4x4 Toyota pickup.

From research that I have done, I know that folks highly recommend staying away from heavy 4x4 components but I live in a location that 4x4 is needed with snowy winters. Does anyone have any advice or links to others that have done similar conversions on a 4x4? Have successful projects just retained the original transmission / driveline powered off one electric engine? Or two engines?

I'm planning on an AC motor and doing research on batteries etc. I'm hoping to get around a 150 mile range... I know it might be a long shot. Is this a feasible build?

Max
 

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Simplest way to build would be to replace the engine with motor, retaining the transmission and transfer case. cons are the added weight, age, and friction of those parts. If you don’t retain the transmission you will likely have issues with gear ratio.

If your front differential is compatible with running at highway speeds, you could try to ditch the transmission and transfer case and run (properly geared) power directly from the motor to your front and rear axles (AWD). There is an episode of vintage voltage where they do this method on an old Land Rover.

YouTuber roadstercycle is doing some sort of awd build using a center, front and rear differential.

with the small truck you have plenty of room for battery, just a question of how much battery weight will the truck handle.

I like those old Toyota’s, I would love to have a late 80s 4Runner
 

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I'm considering converting my '89 Toyota Masterace (JDM version of the Toyota Van). Its drivetrain is built similarly to the same-era 4Runner and Truck (Hilux) as far as I know. Lots of room for batteries. Huge compartment for a motor. Currently gets about 16 mpg so this would be a massive increase in efficiency. Still unsure on motor selection, though.

I have converted two old Series Land Rover to eletric. You can check out my little website: blackcockatoos.wordpress.com
I hope you find some information there.

Jens
You have a peak power for the Siemens 1PV5 1315-4WS14 of 150 kW, but I only see power curves showing 100 kW (though admittedly for durations of 30 seconds). Any issues you've seen with your build? What controller did you end up using? That build looks great!
 

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If your front differential is compatible with running at highway speeds
The OP (or anyone) can correct me about this but i haven't see anything specifically about speed with the front diff on these trucks, more about using 4x4 on hard surfaces causing transmission wind and breaking stuff.
 

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The OP (or anyone) can correct me about this but i haven't see anything specifically about speed with the front diff on these trucks, more about using 4x4 on hard surfaces causing transmission wind and breaking stuff.
I don’t know about the Asian trucks but I do know that in other vehicles if you convert from selectable 4x4 to AWD you need ensure that the front driveshaft and the front diff will be compatible to run at highway speeds. Often these parts are only designed to run at relatively low speeds when in snow or off-roading so the driveshaft may not be balanced for high rpm, for example, or the front differential not designed to endure that kind of long distance high RPM heat. Separate issue from the driving on hard surfaces issue, which can be solved by the proper transfer case with open or limited slip differential between driveshafts.
 

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The OP (or anyone) can correct me about this but i haven't see anything specifically about speed with the front diff on these trucks, more about using 4x4 on hard surfaces causing transmission wind and breaking stuff.
I've never heard of an issue, either. The internals of the front and rear differentials are often identical, and the reduction ratios of the ring-and-pinion sets are normally identical because the transfer case's front and rear outputs turn at the same speed.

I don’t know about the Asian trucks but I do know that in other vehicles if you convert from selectable 4x4 to AWD you need ensure that the front driveshaft and the front diff will be compatible to run at highway speeds. Often these parts are only designed to run at relatively low speeds when in snow or off-roading so the driveshaft may not be balanced for high rpm, for example, or the front differential not designed to endure that kind of long distance high RPM heat.
While some truck could be built with a front propeller shaft that isn't balanced properly, that would be extraordinarily poor construction - even city speeds are too high to operate an unbalanced shaft. The axle shafts in most modern 4WD vehicles turn even when in 2WD, so they are not an issue.
 

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My plan is to have a custom driveshaft built between the electric motor and the transfer case so that the vehicle retains low and high range (full time 4x4 with lockable center diff). I think I will need a 2:1 reduction box to get the best RPM/MPH from the conversion, but I am not sure where to start with that. End result I hope to have a capable electric offroader even if range is only 30-50 miles.
 

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My plan is to have a custom driveshaft built between the electric motor and the transfer case so that the vehicle retains low and high range (full time 4x4 with lockable center diff). I think I will need a 2:1 reduction box to get the best RPM/MPH from the conversion, but I am not sure where to start with that. End result I hope to have a capable electric offroader even if range is only 30-50 miles.
Do you have a divorced transfer case in that vehicle already? Planning to buy an aftermarket one?
I have temporary 4x4 with no locking diff
 

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Do you have a divorced transfer case in that vehicle already? Planning to buy an aftermarket one?
I have temporary 4x4 with no locking diff
No I have an FZJ80 Land Cruiser which has a t-case that bolts onto the rear of the transmission. I am planning on cutting apart the transmission and fabricating something.

Or I can just spending the coin on a "Black Box doubler" which would also give me an additional 2.7:1 reduction but it not really designed for highway use and it's $2500!

Last option is just swap the t-case for an older divorced style from an earlier Cruiser.

Black Box doubler: BlackBox-c Land Cruiser Edition
 

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No I have an FZJ80 Land Cruiser which has a t-case that bolts onto the rear of the transmission. I am planning on cutting apart the transmission and fabricating something.
Yes i've wondered about that, yet to break the box apart to see what a mess i'd be dealing with, how much of a can of worms it'd be.
 
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