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Imagine you could charge your batteries while cruising the interstate. Inflight Charging is a startup company developing this concept to be a reality. We’re currently looking to get in touch with our first customers and help them with their specific needs on a case-by-case basis.

To know more about it, sign up for a interview with the team at the following link:

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Need to know more about it before I'd consider signing up to know more about it.

This?

Hey remy_martin, thank you for asking.

Answering to your question, Inflight Charging is developing a system that will allow us to recharge your EV while on the road, connecting to other vehicle, just like a fighter jet does to recharge while on the air. Let us know if you're interested, we'll be happy to take your call.
 

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They can block you in your parking spot and deliver a charge to your car while you pee, though.

Even give you a Salt Flats style push start which means 10:1 drive ratios are for the history books. 1:1 drive ratio, 60Hz 3 phase motors for CHEAP propulsion and 1 million mile motor bearings.

These on the fly chargers will likely be platformed on an F650...to carry all that charging battery without consuming it. Burn diesel while charging.
 

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seems like an interesting idea, but I think that's all it'll ever be.

Is it a physical connection to the vehicle? eg a pantograph system like a train? That's the most efficient way to do it, but then it only really applies to heavy vehicles, long haul trucks, passenger coaches etc on interstate runs between cities. That system already exists and is being trialed in Europe. (Tom Scott recently did a youtube video on it)
That wont work for the vast majority of regular passenger cars because nobody is going to want the bulky, ugly and very un-aerodynamic pantograph on top of their car. It'd be like having roof racks that you can't even do anything with. All the cons and none of the pro's. The few passenger cars that would have any use for it would essentially be people who primarily spend lots of time on the interstate, eg, an absurdly small segment of the somewhat niche EV market. There wouldn't be enough passenger vehicles using the system to cover the cost of the infrastructure.
Your also limited in a system to only being able to charge where the infrastructure is installed. It won't get installed all through cities because the overhead wires are unsightly and councils will refuse the planning approvals. It would be dead in the water before the first cables get strung up.

Or, is it a 'wireless' system, where they are proposing a long run of charging pads embedded in the road surface with an inductive charging pad underneath the vehicle? Again, it'll be of little benefit to most passenger cars, as they are already fairly low to the ground, there isn't really 'room' under the floor and battery pack to fit the inductive pad and not have the constant risk of damage during driving. Manufacturers won't adopt a 'standard' between themselves for such a system so it'd have to be an aftermarket install, where there is no room for it as mentioned previously.
There is also the very large lack of efficiency when it comes to inductive charging and the simple fact that the distance between the inductive charging pads is very critical, Closer is better and the efficiency drops off very quickly as the space increases. For charging your phone or tablet, its no big deal, but when scaled up to an interstate transport system it creates absolutely huge amounts of localised waste energy and heat, not to mention the extra cost, heat, maintenance, wasteage, generation capacity usage etc at the power stations that are making the electricity for the electrified highway. The environmental impact would be a substantial negative against the whole system.

How long is each charging highway going to be? If your traveling at 100mph average, a 50 mile long section of electric highway will only give you half an hours charge at a fairly low rate of charge, that'll give what? maybe another 10 miles of range?
With a highway generally costing around $2m per mile and upwards depending on many factors, that 50 mile stretch of electric highway could very easily cost $100m or more, and that's just a single 50 mile section. Is there enough demand to cover that financial outlay? especially when many general passenger cars aren't likely to be suitable for the inductive pad to be installed?
What happens when the electric highway needs to be resurfaced? Every layer added will increase the distance between the charging pad and vehicle induction pad, which further reduces the efficiency of the system, lowering the rate of charge. How are you going to regulate the system and calculate charges to the user? If its an inductive charging system there isn't really anything stopping a diy'er from making thier own inductive charger and bootlegging the charging system for free, Its not like you can just turn the road off, because that turns it off for everyone that is paying to use it. Otherwise it'd have to be a complex system that detects the user, verifies that they are eligible and turns on each section of pad as they travel over it, creating a lot of complexity and switching systems for the entire run and increasing the cost per mile to build it.

As for a physical connection between two vehicles, lol, Your now expecting someone to drive at very close proximity to the rear of the charge vehicle in front. Thats asking for an accident to happen, Or is this going to be managed by some sort of autonomous driving system? the saftey concerns alone with something like that will likely never make it past any sort of regulatory bodies.
 

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You obviously didn't read the spectrum article on how it's done - 2nd posting in this thread.

I am a fan of overhead pantographs for heavy vehicles, and think they'll prevail over charge cables for trucks and buses. While they allow in-motion charging (either underslung as being trialled in Europe, iirc, or overhead), using them with overhead canopies at charging stations makes sense to me.

Inductive is inefficient. In-motion requires a "skate" under the road that speed matches the vehicle, which is impractical. Or a vehicle carrying excess battery capacity to "in-air refuel" - likely on a heavy diesel truck (or arguably an electric one...in either case, energy losses occur because that heavy vehicle consumes energy to deliver charge, which doesn't seem too smart to me).

Copper pricing has gone nuts the past few years, so any kind of in-road/ground/floor system is simply an academics' sandbox that Wall Street & Mother Nature's cat already peed in.
 

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I am a fan of overhead pantographs for heavy vehicles, and think they'll prevail over charge cables for trucks and buses. While they allow in-motion charging (either underslung as being trialled in Europe, iirc, or overhead), using them with overhead canopies at charging stations makes sense to me.
The City of Edmonton has dozens of battery-electric transit buses, and installed overhead charging connections in the garage which was built to accommodate them. It is a better setup than plugged-in cables for this application, and there's even an industry standard for it: SAE J3105.

A moving system is another matter entirely.
 

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You obviously didn't read the spectrum article on how it's done - 2nd posting in this thread.
Your right, I didn't read it. These 'ideas' people come up with are usually all the same, and they all get shot down the same way because they don't research properly or test their ideas. This one is no different.

Its good on paper but only if you ignore all the practical real life problems. Its a pipe dream at best, and at worst an attempt to make a profit through scamming investors and development subsidies, eg, 'Solar Roadways'
 

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This?

Presumably something like that.

From that article:
Jet fighters can’t carry a huge tank of fuel because it would slow them down. Instead they have recourse to air-to-air refueling, using massive tanker planes as their gas stations.
That's nonsense. Fighters do carry a huge tank of fuel, and execute most missions with that fuel. In-air refuelling is used only for exceptionally long missions, and is insanely expensive to operate. Military operations resort to in-air refuelling because they have nowhere available to land and refuel, which doesn't apply to road vehicles on a highway.

Mobile charging works by dividing a car’s battery pack into independent banks of cells. One bank runs the motor, the other one accepts charge.
More nonsense. Hybrid vehicles provide power from the generator set (engine and generator) while using power in the traction motor connected to the same battery all the time - the battery just floats on the HV DC bus, net charging or discharging as a result of the difference between generated power and consumed power. There is no need to devise a complex separation system which will create an imbalanced state of charge among the modules in the pack, and require both banks to run at a higher rate than they would need to as a single bank.
 

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Inflight Charging is developing a system that will allow us to recharge your EV while on the road, connecting to other vehicle, just like a fighter jet does to recharge while on the air.
Presumably Inflight Charging is also planning to train and manage drivers to the same standard as military combat pilots. :LOL::ROFLMAO::LOL:

Yes, I realize that the whole scheme would assume the use of autonomous vehicle control at a level far beyond what has been accomplished so far. No thanks.
 

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This use of "magment" ("magnetic cement") for in-motion charging is so much better. /s

So much "better" that the National Science Foundation is throwing >$20M at it, iirc, and the State of Indiana is supposedly going to build a segment of road with it:


Even scammier than Solar Roadways, imo

Like I said, academics playing in a sandbox the cat peed in, and Mr Lenz and Mr Faraday are also buried in it.

Meanwhile copper futures are at $4.37 an ounce, up 50% YoY and almost double over the past 5 years, to where I'm getting major heartburn thinking about when to buy some bus bars.
 

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Mobile charging works by dividing a car’s battery pack into independent banks of cells. One bank runs the motor, the other one accepts charge.


More nonsense. Hybrid vehicles provide power from the generator set (engine and generator) while using power in the traction motor connected to the same battery all the time - the battery just floats on the HV DC bus, net charging or discharging as a result of the difference between generated power and consumed power. There is no need to devise a complex separation system which will create an imbalanced state of charge among the modules in the pack, and require both banks to run at a higher rate than they would need to as a single bank.
obviously someone who wrote that you need to split battery packs into 2 to charge and discharge doesn't understand the basics of electricity, less so publish an article in ieee
 

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Can't imagine what it's going to cost to isolate this from passengers with implanted medical devices.
 
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