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Joined
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70 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As a relatively new EV owner and driver, I thought I would pass along some
thoughts and things I've learned from my first couple months driving an EV.
I'm always interested in thoughts and comments from others. Many of the
ideas I'll mention below are items that one or more people in the group have
helped me with. I truly appreciate all the help I've gotten during this
time of learning.



1. If driving a conversion, you should probably expect to be at least
somewhat self-supporting. You can't drive into any Jiffy-Lube and expect
them to know what to do with your car. With a conversion, I think you
really have to look at yourself as an "early adopter" and know how to deal
with a certain level of issues. Since I have an electrical engineering
background, this doesn't bother me, but it wouldn't be for everyone. I
would expect that commercial EVs wouldn't have this issue so much. You
still couldn't go just anywhere, but should be able to take it to the
dealer.



2. Even if you are largely self-supported, there is still help
available. Fork-lift shops will probably recognize most of the EV-specific
parts and know what to do with them. Standard mechanics will know what to
do with the rest of the parts.



3. You can work on an electric car without getting dirty! This seems
like a small thing, but I really like it. I've done some installation of
parts and reworking of wiring and my hands were still clean. I've never
been able to work on a car without getting dirty before. Of course, there
are mechanical parts that are just as dirty as other cars, but not that
many.



4. While working on an EV, care and quality of workmanship is
critical. You are dealing with high voltages and high currents and careless
or sloppy workmanship could be spectacular (and damaging). Don't be scared,
but be careful.



5. Be prepared to do some upgrades and wiring in your home to support
charging an EV. Even if the EV stays within "normal" limits such as a 15A,
120V AC circuit for charging, you will probably find that it pushes the
envelope on your house wiring. Your standard circuit in the garage is rated
15A, but it wasn't really intended to do that for 5 hours per day. The
parts are easily available to upgrade to commercial, heavy-duty parts, but
they are probably not in the average house. This will probably be true of
commercial EVs also. Further, you could easily find yourself wishing for
more capability such as 20 or 30A or 240V (or both) to reduce charging time.



6. "Range-anxiety" is real, but not that disabling. It is a little
disconcerting to realize that you have (at most) the equivalent of 1 to 2
gallons of gas, and can't recharge at just any street corner. However, for
a regular commute that shouldn't be an issue. When adding errands or other
driving on top of that commute, you just have to be aware of the amount of
capacity you have left. Having something as simple as a working "fuel"
gauge makes a lot of difference. It just goes from Full to Empty a lot
faster than you are used to! This will be less of an issue with commercial
EVs, but still a consideration.



7. It really is fun! You really notice how much racket (and fumes)
the other vehicles around you are making. Sitting at a light, in a
convertible electric car, is really a new experience. While waiting, you
know they're going to make as much noise as they do movement when the light
turns green, while you're going to quietly pull away from them. (Gotta love
that low-end torque!)



8. It's a great conversation piece. My car is actually a complete
sleeper (no emblem or way to tell it is electric), but as soon as people
learn it is, they want to look under the hood. Since it has lithium cells
with per-cell BMS, it really looks strange.



Mike

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Registered
Joined
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70 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Thanks for posting this, Mike. It is so easy to "forget" the obvious
things after driving an EV for a few years. I'm going to pass these
observations along to others if you don't mind.


On Thu, Sep 16, 2010 at 10:30 PM, Mike Nickerson
<[email protected]> wrote:
> As a relatively new EV owner and driver, I thought I would pass along some
> thoughts and things I've learned from my first couple months driving an E=
V.
> I'm always interested in thoughts and comments from others. Many of the
> ideas I'll mention below are items that one or more people in the group h=
ave
> helped me with. I truly appreciate all the help I've gotten during this
> time of learning.
>
>
>
> 1. If driving a conversion, you should probably expect to =
be at least
> somewhat self-supporting. You can't drive into any Jiffy-Lube and expe=
ct
> them to know what to do with your car. With a conversion, I think you
> really have to look at yourself as an "early adopter" and know how to deal
> with a certain level of issues. Since I have an electrical engineering
> background, this doesn't bother me, but it wouldn't be for everyone. I
> would expect that commercial EVs wouldn't have this issue so much. You
> still couldn't go just anywhere, but should be able to take it to the
> dealer.
>
>
>
> 2. Even if you are largely self-supported, there is still help
> available. Fork-lift shops will probably recognize most of the EV-spec=
ific
> parts and know what to do with them. Standard mechanics will know what=
to
> do with the rest of the parts.
>
>
>
> 3. You can work on an electric car without getting dirty! =
This seems
> like a small thing, but I really like it. I've done some installation =
of
> parts and reworking of wiring and my hands were still clean. I've never
> been able to work on a car without getting dirty before. Of course, th=
ere
> are mechanical parts that are just as dirty as other cars, but not that
> many.
>
>
>
> 4. While working on an EV, care and quality of workmanship is
> critical. You are dealing with high voltages and high currents and car=
eless
> or sloppy workmanship could be spectacular (and damaging). Don't be sc=
ared,
> but be careful.
>
>
>
> 5. Be prepared to do some upgrades and wiring in your home to=
support
> charging an EV. Even if the EV stays within "normal" limits such as a =
15A,
> 120V AC circuit for charging, you will probably find that it pushes the
> envelope on your house wiring. Your standard circuit in the garage is =
rated
> 15A, but it wasn't really intended to do that for 5 hours per day. The
> parts are easily available to upgrade to commercial, heavy-duty parts, but
> they are probably not in the average house. This will probably be true=
of
> commercial EVs also. Further, you could easily find yourself wishing f=
or
> more capability such as 20 or 30A or 240V (or both) to reduce charging ti=
me.
>
>
>
> 6. "Range-anxiety" is real, but not that disabling. It is =
a little
> disconcerting to realize that you have (at most) the equivalent of 1 to 2
> gallons of gas, and can't recharge at just any street corner. However,=
for
> a regular commute that shouldn't be an issue. When adding errands or o=
ther
> driving on top of that commute, you just have to be aware of the amount of
> capacity you have left. Having something as simple as a working "fuel"
> gauge makes a lot of difference. It just goes from Full to Empty a lot
> faster than you are used to! This will be less of an issue with commer=
cial
> EVs, but still a consideration.
>
>
>
> 7. It really is fun! You really notice how much racket (an=
d fumes)
> the other vehicles around you are making. Sitting at a light, in a
> convertible electric car, is really a new experience. While waiting, y=
ou
> know they're going to make as much noise as they do movement when the lig=
ht
> turns green, while you're going to quietly pull away from them. (Gotta=
love
> that low-end torque!)
>
>
>
> 8. It's a great conversation piece. My car is actually a c=
omplete
> sleeper (no emblem or way to tell it is electric), but as soon as people
> learn it is, they want to look under the hood. Since it has lithium ce=
lls
> with per-cell BMS, it really looks strange.
>
>
>
> Mike
>
> -------------- next part --------------
> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
> URL: http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/private/ev/attachments/20100916/a967b8=
dd/attachment.html
> _______________________________________________
> | REPLYING: address your message to [email protected] only.
> | Multiple-address or CCed messages may be rejected.
> | UNSUBSCRIBE: http://www.evdl.org/help/index.html#usub
> | OTHER HELP: http://evdl.org/help/
> | OPTIONS: http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>



-- =

David D. Nelson
http://evalbum.com/1328

_______________________________________________
| REPLYING: address your message to [email protected] only.
| Multiple-address or CCed messages may be rejected.
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·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Sure. That's why I posted it.

Mike

-----Original Message-----
From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf
Of David Nelson
Sent: Wednesday, September 22, 2010 7:16 PM
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Advice for New EV Owners

Thanks for posting this, Mike. It is so easy to "forget" the obvious things
after driving an EV for a few years. I'm going to pass these observations
along to others if you don't mind.


On Thu, Sep 16, 2010 at 10:30 PM, Mike Nickerson <[email protected]>
wrote:
> As a relatively new EV owner and driver, I thought I would pass along =

> some thoughts and things I've learned from my first couple months driving
an EV.
> I'm always interested in thoughts and comments from others. Many of =

> the ideas I'll mention below are items that one or more people in the =

> group have helped me with. I truly appreciate all the help I've =

> gotten during this time of learning.
>
>
>
> 1. If driving a conversion, you should probably expect to =
be at =

> least somewhat self-supporting. You can't drive into any Jiffy-Lube =

> and expect them to know what to do with your car. With a conversion, =

> I think you really have to look at yourself as an "early adopter" and =

> know how to deal with a certain level of issues. Since I have an =

> electrical engineering background, this doesn't bother me, but it =

> wouldn't be for everyone. I would expect that commercial EVs wouldn't =

> have this issue so much. You still couldn't go just anywhere, but =

> should be able to take it to the dealer.
>
>
>
> 2. Even if you are largely self-supported, there is still hel=
p =

> available. Fork-lift shops will probably recognize most of the =

> EV-specific parts and know what to do with them. Standard mechanics =

> will know what to do with the rest of the parts.
>
>
>
> 3. You can work on an electric car without getting dirty! =
This =

> seems like a small thing, but I really like it. I've done some =

> installation of parts and reworking of wiring and my hands were still =

> clean. I've never been able to work on a car without getting dirty =

> before. Of course, there are mechanical parts that are just as dirty =

> as other cars, but not that many.
>
>
>
> 4. While working on an EV, care and quality of workmanship is =

> critical. You are dealing with high voltages and high currents and =

> careless or sloppy workmanship could be spectacular (and damaging).
> Don't be scared, but be careful.
>
>
>
> 5. Be prepared to do some upgrades and wiring in your home to =

> support charging an EV. Even if the EV stays within "normal" limits =

> such as a 15A, 120V AC circuit for charging, you will probably find =

> that it pushes the envelope on your house wiring. Your standard =

> circuit in the garage is rated 15A, but it wasn't really intended to =

> do that for 5 hours per day. The parts are easily available to =

> upgrade to commercial, heavy-duty parts, but they are probably not in =

> the average house. This will probably be true of commercial EVs also. =

> Further, you could easily find yourself wishing for more capability such
as 20 or 30A or 240V (or both) to reduce charging time.
>
>
>
> 6. "Range-anxiety" is real, but not that disabling. It is =
a =

> little disconcerting to realize that you have (at most) the equivalent =

> of 1 to 2 gallons of gas, and can't recharge at just any street =

> corner. However, for a regular commute that shouldn't be an issue.
> When adding errands or other driving on top of that commute, you just =

> have to be aware of the amount of capacity you have left. Having
something as simple as a working "fuel"
> gauge makes a lot of difference. It just goes from Full to Empty a =

> lot faster than you are used to! This will be less of an issue with =

> commercial EVs, but still a consideration.
>
>
>
> 7. It really is fun! You really notice how much racket (an=
d =

> fumes) the other vehicles around you are making. Sitting at a light, =

> in a convertible electric car, is really a new experience. While =

> waiting, you know they're going to make as much noise as they do =

> movement when the light turns green, while you're going to quietly =

> pull away from them. (Gotta love that low-end torque!)
>
>
>
> 8. It's a great conversation piece. My car is actually a =

> complete sleeper (no emblem or way to tell it is electric), but as =

> soon as people learn it is, they want to look under the hood. Since =

> it has lithium cells with per-cell BMS, it really looks strange.
>
>
>
> Mike
>
> -------------- next part -------------- An HTML attachment was =

> scrubbed...
> URL: =

> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/private/ev/attachments/20100916/a967b8dd
> /attachment.html _______________________________________________
> | REPLYING: address your message to [email protected] only.
> | Multiple-address or CCed messages may be rejected.
> | UNSUBSCRIBE: http://www.evdl.org/help/index.html#usub
> | OTHER HELP: http://evdl.org/help/
> | OPTIONS: http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>



--
David D. Nelson
http://evalbum.com/1328

_______________________________________________
| REPLYING: address your message to [email protected] only.
| Multiple-address or CCed messages may be rejected.
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| OTHER HELP: http://evdl.org/help/
| OPTIONS: http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev



_______________________________________________
| REPLYING: address your message to [email protected] only.
| Multiple-address or CCed messages may be rejected.
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| OTHER HELP: http://evdl.org/help/
| OPTIONS: http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Mike, I also thank you for posting this, And I hope you and other members of
this list don't mind , as I am putting a notebook of things EV hobbyists
learn from experience that are not in a publication. I have about 25 pages
of a variety of paragraphs of "Interesting " Information and I expect it
will grow as time goes on . I intend to pass it along to my trainees as
invaluable info learned thru experience. in free daily "Hand-outs'" and
eventually I will use them as small articles in the E.V.T.I.-EVA
newsletter. I promise to leave your name and EVDL as the source although
most items on the web are in the public domain unless marked as copyrighted
in your e-mail...I will only claim to arrange them and not to be the authors
as you each deserve that recognition. I save a page or two almost every
week, because you-all are good, wise, and Knowledgeable. Oh sorry but I
refuse to put over-unity items in.
Regards,
Dennis Lee Miles (Director) E.V.T.I. inc.
*www.E-V-T-I-Inc.COM * (Adviser) EVTI-EVA Education Chapter
Phone (863) 944 - 9913
---------------------------------------------------------------------------=
--------------------------------------
On Thu, Sep 23, 2010 at 12:03 AM, Mike Nickerson <[email protected]>w=
rote:

> Sure. That's why I posted it.
>
> Mike
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On
> Behalf
> Of David Nelson
> Sent: Wednesday, September 22, 2010 7:16 PM
> To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List
> Subject: Re: [EVDL] Advice for New EV Owners
>
> Thanks for posting this, Mike. It is so easy to "forget" the obvious thin=
gs
> after driving an EV for a few years. I'm going to pass these observations
> along to others if you don't mind.
>
>
> On Thu, Sep 16, 2010 at 10:30 PM, Mike Nickerson <[email protected]>
> wrote:
> > As a relatively new EV owner and driver, I thought I would pass along
> > some thoughts and things I've learned from my first couple months drivi=
ng
> an EV.
> > I'm always interested in thoughts and comments from others. Many of
> > the ideas I'll mention below are items that one or more people in the
> > group have helped me with. I truly appreciate all the help I've
> > gotten during this time of learning.
> >
> >
> >
> > 1. If driving a conversion, you should probably expect to be at
> > least somewhat self-supporting. You can't drive into any Jiffy-Lube
> > and expect them to know what to do with your car. With a conversion,
> > I think you really have to look at yourself as an "early adopter" and
> > know how to deal with a certain level of issues. Since I have an
> > electrical engineering background, this doesn't bother me, but it
> > wouldn't be for everyone. I would expect that commercial EVs wouldn't
> > have this issue so much. You still couldn't go just anywhere, but
> > should be able to take it to the dealer.
> >
> >
> >
> > 2. Even if you are largely self-supported, there is still help
> > available. Fork-lift shops will probably recognize most of the
> > EV-specific parts and know what to do with them. Standard mechanics
> > will know what to do with the rest of the parts.
> >
> >
> >
> > 3. You can work on an electric car without getting dirty! This
> > seems like a small thing, but I really like it. I've done some
> > installation of parts and reworking of wiring and my hands were still
> > clean. I've never been able to work on a car without getting dirty
> > before. Of course, there are mechanical parts that are just as dirty
> > as other cars, but not that many.
> >
> >
> >
> > 4. While working on an EV, care and quality of workmanship is
> > critical. You are dealing with high voltages and high currents and
> > careless or sloppy workmanship could be spectacular (and damaging).
> > Don't be scared, but be careful.
> >
> >
> >
> > 5. Be prepared to do some upgrades and wiring in your home to
> > support charging an EV. Even if the EV stays within "normal" limits
> > such as a 15A, 120V AC circuit for charging, you will probably find
> > that it pushes the envelope on your house wiring. Your standard
> > circuit in the garage is rated 15A, but it wasn't really intended to
> > do that for 5 hours per day. The parts are easily available to
> > upgrade to commercial, heavy-duty parts, but they are probably not in
> > the average house. This will probably be true of commercial EVs also.
> > Further, you could easily find yourself wishing for more capability such
> as 20 or 30A or 240V (or both) to reduce charging time.
> >
> >
> >
> > 6. "Range-anxiety" is real, but not that disabling. It is a
> > little disconcerting to realize that you have (at most) the equivalent
> > of 1 to 2 gallons of gas, and can't recharge at just any street
> > corner. However, for a regular commute that shouldn't be an issue.
> > When adding errands or other driving on top of that commute, you just
> > have to be aware of the amount of capacity you have left. Having
> something as simple as a working "fuel"
> > gauge makes a lot of difference. It just goes from Full to Empty a
> > lot faster than you are used to! This will be less of an issue with
> > commercial EVs, but still a consideration.
> >
> >
> >
> > 7. It really is fun! You really notice how much racket (and
> > fumes) the other vehicles around you are making. Sitting at a light,
> > in a convertible electric car, is really a new experience. While
> > waiting, you know they're going to make as much noise as they do
> > movement when the light turns green, while you're going to quietly
> > pull away from them. (Gotta love that low-end torque!)
> >
> >
> >
> > 8. It's a great conversation piece. My car is actually a
> > complete sleeper (no emblem or way to tell it is electric), but as
> > soon as people learn it is, they want to look under the hood. Since
> > it has lithium cells with per-cell BMS, it really looks strange.
> >
> >
> >
> > Mike
> >
> > -------------- next part -------------- An HTML attachment was
> > scrubbed...
> > URL:
> > http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/private/ev/attachments/20100916/a967b8dd
> > /attachment.html _______________________________________________
> > | REPLYING: address your message to [email protected] only.
> > | Multiple-address or CCed messages may be rejected.
> > | UNSUBSCRIBE: http://www.evdl.org/help/index.html#usub
> > | OTHER HELP: http://evdl.org/help/
> > | OPTIONS: http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> >
>
>
>
> --
> David D. Nelson
> http://evalbum.com/1328
>
> _______________________________________________
> | REPLYING: address your message to [email protected] only.
> | Multiple-address or CCed messages may be rejected.
> | UNSUBSCRIBE: http://www.evdl.org/help/index.html#usub
> | OTHER HELP: http://evdl.org/help/
> | OPTIONS: http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> | REPLYING: address your message to [email protected] only.
> | Multiple-address or CCed messages may be rejected.
> | UNSUBSCRIBE: http://www.evdl.org/help/index.html#usub
> | OTHER HELP: http://evdl.org/help/
> | OPTIONS: http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>



It=92s estimated that the existing U.S. electrical grid has sufficient
capacity to fully fuel three-quarters of the nation=92s 217 million passeng=
er
vehicles.
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