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Discussion Starter #1
Check out the following publication on why not to mix copper cable with and
aluminum connections...

http://www.coppercanada.ca/publications/pub42e/42e.htm

Might not be new info to some, but revealing pictures anyways.

Tyler
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Discussion Starter #2
Tyler,

That is a good article. I bought copper connectors for my
copper wire but at one time I was thinking of getting aluminum ones.
Now I am glad I didn't.


Jody

-----Original Message-----
From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On
Behalf Of Tyler
Sent: Wednesday, October 03, 2007 9:45
To: EV
Subject: [EVDL] Aluminum, copper and why not to mix

Check out the following publication on why not to mix copper cable with
and aluminum connections...

http://www.coppercanada.ca/publications/pub42e/42e.htm

Might not be new info to some, but revealing pictures anyways.

Tyler
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Discussion Starter #3
interesting data but I don't think it shows mixing is bad. while those
involving alu look a bit funky after 2000hours of 1800A in a corrosive
environment, none of the alu-copper mixes showed larger than 10%
increase in resistance. that means if it was 20uOhm to begin with it
never got worse than 22uOhm after 2000 hours.
hardly a catastrophic failure and hardly a light test.
if you coated them with something, they could probably go on forever
even under those conditions

Dan


Tyler wrote:

>Check out the following publication on why not to mix copper cable with and
>aluminum connections...
>
>http://www.coppercanada.ca/publications/pub42e/42e.htm
>
>Might not be new info to some, but revealing pictures anyways.
>
>Tyler
>_______________________________________________
>For subscription options, see
>http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>
>
>

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes, but wouldn't that be 10% per connection? After six connections (4
batteries connected together), my math puts the initial 20uOhm at 42949
Ohms!!!! Now it's early and I've only just started my coffee, so my math
and logic could be severely crippled.




>
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Discussion Starter #5
let's just say the conclusion is not entirely accurate : )
in a series connection 10% is 10%. and that was worst case.

Dan

Tyler wrote:

>Yes, but wouldn't that be 10% per connection? After six connections (4
>batteries connected together), my math puts the initial 20uOhm at 42949
>Ohms!!!! Now it's early and I've only just started my coffee, so my math
>and logic could be severely crippled.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>>
>>
>_______________________________________________
>For subscription options, see
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>
>
>

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Discussion Starter #6
That was 2000 hours in a corrosive environment, but the 1800A was only
short bursts for about 50 seconds every 400 or 500 hours, so less than
5 minutes of current in the testing.

I don't think that's a very extreme test for EVs. They're also in
corrosive environments, with all the salt in the roads (at least
around here). Also, you'll have a whole lot more than 5 minutes of
current on your connections. Albeit at about 10% of the testing
currents.

And 10% isn't that big, but the more resistance you avoid, the better;
especially for lower battery voltages. Even a few tens of milliOhms
makes a big difference if you're pulling 200A at 72V.

-Morgan LaMoore

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