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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone done the following conversion (a cheapskate hybrid):

Take a standard car.
Add electric motor after the transmission.
Add SMALL battery pack for 10 mile range. No charge, regen, etc. Just
10 miles per trip on electric.
May even live with 30 MPH max: electric on streets & arterials, gas on freeway.
Can switch back an forth to IC by clutch or being in neutral.
Average USA daily mileage is about 32, so this might be 1/3 of total
use. 2/3 if charging available at destination.

Any thoughts?

Thanks
JK

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Discussion Starter #2
HI- JK, This sounds like what I'm planning for my 1962 Datsun L320 truck.
Most of my daily trips are less than 5 mi.
but sometimes I have to travel farther. I do plan to instal a low amp.
trickle charge system off the ice engine so the batteries
don't have to set discharged on long trips. -FT.


> [Original Message]
> From: jim karlock <[email protected]>
> To: <[email protected]>
> Date: 10/14/2007 3:32:22 AM
> Subject: [EVDL] Crazy hybrid thought
>
> Has anyone done the following conversion (a cheapskate hybrid):
>
> Take a standard car.
> Add electric motor after the transmission.
> Add SMALL battery pack for 10 mile range. No charge, regen, etc. Just
> 10 miles per trip on electric.
> May even live with 30 MPH max: electric on streets & arterials, gas on
freeway.
> Can switch back an forth to IC by clutch or being in neutral.
> Average USA daily mileage is about 32, so this might be 1/3 of total
> use. 2/3 if charging available at destination.
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> Thanks
> JK
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev



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Discussion Starter #3
jim karlock wrote:
> Has anyone done the following conversion (a cheapskate hybrid):
>
> Take a standard car.
> Add electric motor after the transmission.

For most "standard cars" these days, "after the transmission" is two
places, since the differential is in the same housing. Plus, you wouldn't
really have enough space for a motor at each half-shaft. Your idea is
limited to trucks, and RWD cars with a longitudinal powertrain
(unfortunately a minority).

> Add SMALL battery pack for 10 mile range. No charge, regen, etc. Just
> 10 miles per trip on electric.
> May even live with 30 MPH max: electric on streets & arterials, gas on
> freeway.
> Can switch back an forth to IC by clutch or being in neutral.

Though it's not designed to work precisely the way you describe, take a
look at Netgain's EMIS system:

http://www.go-ev.com/EMIS.html

It's designed to allow a motor placed behind the transmission on RWD
vehicles to assist the engine, forming a plug-in hybrid. It's very simple
and does not include regenerative braking or generation from the engine,
but it works; I've seen a Chevy Blazer they converted with the system.

Perhaps with some effort it could be modified to allow running with the
engine off and the transmission in neutral. But I suspect that it would
perform very poorly.


--
Christopher Robison
[email protected]
http://ohmbre.org <-- 1999 Isuzu Hombre + Z2K + Warp13!

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Discussion Starter #4
Hello Jim,

Did this hybrid test way back in 1985. Work out good if I maintain a speed
over 33 mph and did a lot of 7 percent hill climbing maintain 60 mph at that
time which the EV side may or may not on line at the time.

Anytime I drop below 33 mph or the engine vacuum drops below 15 in.hg., the
engine would disconnect from the motor by using a in and out electric
control clutch and a modulated variable control position accelerator system
would drop the engine to a idle position and switch on the motor controller
on.

I could also program this system, where the motor will help out the engine
anytime the engine drops below 15 in.hg or the engine can assist the motor
if it the motor ampere went over 175 amps.

The problem here is that at lot of low speed driving you are pulling a lot
of extra weight around which cause increase load on the EV side range would
drop. It was great for the 5 years I use it to ascend this hill I travel on
every day. Coming back down this hill this vehicle would coast about 5
miles if I let it, but had to engage the engine to assist in some engine
compression braking that I use when this hill was very icy.

Roland


----- Original Message -----
From: "jim karlock" <[email protected]>
To: <[email protected]>
Sent: Sunday, October 14, 2007 12:07 AM
Subject: [EVDL] Crazy hybrid thought


> Has anyone done the following conversion (a cheapskate hybrid):
>
> Take a standard car.
> Add electric motor after the transmission.
> Add SMALL battery pack for 10 mile range. No charge, regen, etc. Just
> 10 miles per trip on electric.
> May even live with 30 MPH max: electric on streets & arterials, gas on
> freeway.
> Can switch back an forth to IC by clutch or being in neutral.
> Average USA daily mileage is about 32, so this might be 1/3 of total
> use. 2/3 if charging available at destination.
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> Thanks
> JK
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>

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Discussion Starter #5
From: jim karlock
> Has anyone done the following conversion (a cheapskate hybrid):
>
> Take a standard car.
> Add electric motor after the transmission.
> Add SMALL battery pack for 10 mile range. No charge, regen, etc. Just
> 10 miles per trip on electric.

It's been done. I don't know if it is much cheaper, but it can be an easier conversion if you pick the right donor vehicle.

--
"Excellence does not require perfection." -- Henry James
--
Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart-at-earthlink.net

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Discussion Starter #6
This is a good idea, but hasn't been done very much at all,
it is much easier to convert a car into all electric.

I think a good approach and what I've worked on is to add electric drive
to the rear wheel of a FWD car, leaving the ICE part of the car untouched.

Ideally you would replace the ICE with a smaller lighter one and maybe
no transmission since it only needs to run at higher speed,
but that makes a hybrid conversion even that much more difficult and
expensive.

For a RWD car, this isn't as difficult since the engine and trans and
final drive are seperated, so trucks are good candidates for this
conversion.

Andrew Frank at U.C. Davis has been working on these type of hybrids,
a key feature is their CVT transmission that runs the ICE at maximum
efficiency RPM to get the most out of a smaller ICE.

jim karlock wrote:
> Has anyone done the following conversion (a cheapskate hybrid):
>
> Take a standard car.
> Add electric motor after the transmission.
> Add SMALL battery pack for 10 mile range. No charge, regen, etc. Just
> 10 miles per trip on electric.
> May even live with 30 MPH max: electric on streets & arterials, gas on freeway.
> Can switch back an forth to IC by clutch or being in neutral.
> Average USA daily mileage is about 32, so this might be 1/3 of total
> use. 2/3 if charging available at destination.
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> Thanks
> JK
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>


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Discussion Starter #7
Not so crazy.

If I had the resources I would like to try replaceing that dead axle in
my N-body(fwd midsized GM) with an eletric motor driven pair and line
the space between the two rear pillars, you know, right behind the
rear-seat under the rear deck, with batteries.

In this simple conversion I would start the ice and it would run all the
power steering and brakes and provide cruise above 45 or distances
beyond xx miles. the alternator would help charge the pack to make the
idleing motor more useful. The idea would be that most of the motive
force comes from the pack allowing the ICE to idle or run with much less
throttle. I think the Automatic tranny would fight me if not in neutral
so I would probably let the rpm climb, the torque from the ice would be
minimal and so fuel milage would be maximized. I personally would
rather run all electric, but I see where this kind of a kit (batteries
not included) could be a big seller.

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Discussion Starter #8
I am actually planning on trying this in a full size 2004 Chevy Avalanche.
I already have the batteries mounted and the charging system in place. I am
working with NetGain and will install the EMIS module due to arrive this
week. I am getting a special ADC 8: motor with a larger comm end so I can
connect it to the transmission and then attach the output shaft to a
shortened driveshaft. The motor should be here by the end of the month so
hopefully I can have the vehicle running by the end of the year.

In my 6000lb vehicle I was not able to tell any MPG drop due to the first
300lb of batteries. I now have all 12 installed so I am carry and extra 600
lbs which will grow to 800 with the motor. Time will tell if I can get a
noticeable boost in MPG. In the test done by NetGain they have seen a
25-30% improvement in in-town driving.

If interested you can see the plans to date at www.hrivnak.com.

-----Original Message-----
From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf
Of jim karlock
Sent: Sunday, October 14, 2007 2:08 AM
To: [email protected]
Subject: [EVDL] Crazy hybrid thought

Has anyone done the following conversion (a cheapskate hybrid):

Take a standard car.
Add electric motor after the transmission.
Add SMALL battery pack for 10 mile range. No charge, regen, etc. Just
10 miles per trip on electric.
May even live with 30 MPH max: electric on streets & arterials, gas on
freeway.
Can switch back an forth to IC by clutch or being in neutral.
Average USA daily mileage is about 32, so this might be 1/3 of total
use. 2/3 if charging available at destination.

Any thoughts?

Thanks
JK

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Discussion Starter #9
Well there are two ways I can think of to get electricity. One way is to use
fuel of some sort, be it diesel or vegetable oil, petrol, gasoline, natural
gas. Another option is to use solar cells. My only question is how to attach
them to the vehicle?

I would like to paste them over the vehicle, so that they are
aerodynamically placed and go with the contour of the vehicle. Thought about
simply gluing them on with jb weld or that very thick sticky loctite (a lot
quicker). Well just cover the entire surface of the car with solar panels.
Cover the doors, hood, trunk, rear window (unless you need it). Of course
some things need to figured out like how not to overcharge the vehicle. I
suppose two modes could be used, wide open while driving bypassing the
charge controller.

To increase the potential solar watts without carrying around a trailer can
be done. First measure how long the vehicle is. If it is a ford fiesta, then
you have room to increase the length. Basically your length is limited by
what is parkable. Plus, you don't want someone hitting your $1000 solar
panels because it is sticking out. What you need to add to your vehicle is a
trailer hitch with a 2" receiver. It won't ever be used for towing and just
needs to support weight of solar panels, maybe 100lbs. Now get yourself a
hitch haul trailer to put into your receiver. I am talking about one of
those $50 types walmart sells. They are 20" x 60". Make sure you have plenty
of ground clearance. It would be better when you installed the receiver it
was angled up a little bit as you definitely don't want it bottoming it out
down a driveway. Now you need to build your solar box. You can design it
real simple as simply sticking out straight or create a sort of box shape.
Maybe with top being littler then the bottom, so three more solar panels can
be put at angles in front and on both sides.

Of course you could simply get two pipes and bolt them to back side of
vehicle sticking out and then hang and bolt the solar box over it. Plus,
you'd probably want to put two pipes on the bumper or lower part of the
vehicle so that the solar box can rest on four pipes instead of only two
upper pipes.

The final question is how many watts is actually possible to get covering
everything possible and adding solar box in the back. If it isn't enough it
might not be worth it.


jim karlock wrote:
>
> Has anyone done the following conversion (a cheapskate hybrid):
>
> Take a standard car.
> Add electric motor after the transmission.
> Add SMALL battery pack for 10 mile range. No charge, regen, etc. Just
> 10 miles per trip on electric.
> May even live with 30 MPH max: electric on streets & arterials, gas on
> freeway.
> Can switch back an forth to IC by clutch or being in neutral.
> Average USA daily mileage is about 32, so this might be 1/3 of total
> use. 2/3 if charging available at destination.
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> Thanks
> JK
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>
>

--
View this message in context: http://www.nabble.com/Crazy-hybrid-thought-tf4621210s25542.html#a13206395
Sent from the Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list archive at Nabble.com.

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Discussion Starter #10
Realistically you will not get any appreciable range with solar. Maybe
1/2 a percent. If you mount the panels on your house, you can have it
charge your vehicle while it is at your house. That way you can have
many more panels and effectively use the sun. BUT, panels arent cheap
so it might be cheaper just to charge from the regular house current.

-----Original Message-----
From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On
Behalf Of ampaynz1
Sent: Monday, October 15, 2007 0:00
To: [email protected]
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Crazy hybrid thought


Well there are two ways I can think of to get electricity. One way is to
use fuel of some sort, be it diesel or vegetable oil, petrol, gasoline,
natural gas. Another option is to use solar cells. My only question is
how to attach them to the vehicle?

I would like to paste them over the vehicle, so that they are
aerodynamically placed and go with the contour of the vehicle. Thought
about simply gluing them on with jb weld or that very thick sticky
loctite (a lot quicker). Well just cover the entire surface of the car
with solar panels.
Cover the doors, hood, trunk, rear window (unless you need it). Of
course some things need to figured out like how not to overcharge the
vehicle. I suppose two modes could be used, wide open while driving
bypassing the charge controller.

To increase the potential solar watts without carrying around a trailer
can be done. First measure how long the vehicle is. If it is a ford
fiesta, then you have room to increase the length. Basically your length
is limited by what is parkable. Plus, you don't want someone hitting
your $1000 solar panels because it is sticking out. What you need to add
to your vehicle is a trailer hitch with a 2" receiver. It won't ever be
used for towing and just needs to support weight of solar panels, maybe
100lbs. Now get yourself a hitch haul trailer to put into your receiver.
I am talking about one of those $50 types walmart sells. They are 20" x
60". Make sure you have plenty of ground clearance. It would be better
when you installed the receiver it was angled up a little bit as you
definitely don't want it bottoming it out down a driveway. Now you need
to build your solar box. You can design it real simple as simply
sticking out straight or create a sort of box shape.
Maybe with top being littler then the bottom, so three more solar panels
can be put at angles in front and on both sides.

Of course you could simply get two pipes and bolt them to back side of
vehicle sticking out and then hang and bolt the solar box over it. Plus,
you'd probably want to put two pipes on the bumper or lower part of the
vehicle so that the solar box can rest on four pipes instead of only two
upper pipes.

The final question is how many watts is actually possible to get
covering everything possible and adding solar box in the back. If it
isn't enough it might not be worth it.


jim karlock wrote:
>
> Has anyone done the following conversion (a cheapskate hybrid):
>
> Take a standard car.
> Add electric motor after the transmission.
> Add SMALL battery pack for 10 mile range. No charge, regen, etc. Just
> 10 miles per trip on electric.
> May even live with 30 MPH max: electric on streets & arterials, gas on

> freeway.
> Can switch back an forth to IC by clutch or being in neutral.
> Average USA daily mileage is about 32, so this might be 1/3 of total
> use. 2/3 if charging available at destination.
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> Thanks
> JK
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>
>

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http://www.nabble.com/Crazy-hybrid-thought-tf4621210s25542.html#a1320639
5
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Nabble.com.

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Discussion Starter #11
From: ampaynz1
> Well there are two ways I can think of to get electricity. One way
> is to use fuel of some sort... Another option is to use solar cells.

There are actually quite a few ways to get electricity within the vehicle. Besides the two you mentioned, you can use batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, wind generators, flywheels, etc.

> My only question is how to attach them to the vehicle?

Mounting methods for solar cells are fairly well worked out. In general, you can either manufacture the solar cells directly on some suitable surface (sheet metal, glass, or plastic); or you can manufacture the solar cells separately, and adhesively bond them to your intended surface.

The adhesives used are rather specialized. They need to be sufficiently flexible so the fragile solar cells don't break, UV resistant to survive for years in the sun, and (of course) transparent so light can reach the cells. Clear silicone rubber coatings are popular.

> I would like to paste them over the vehicle, so that they are
> aerodynamically placed and go with the contour of the vehicle.

Study the college solar sunraycers for examples and ideas. You'll find that with the very best cells, most efficient drive systems, and extremely lightweight and streamlined vehicles, it is indeed possible to drive at freeway speeds purely on solar power. However, these vehicles are not really practical. They are very spartan and flimsy; not much more substantial than a bicycle.

But if people demand vehicles of the same size and weight as conventional cars, then covering their entire surface with solar cells will only give you enough power to drive a few miles per day.

There is room for something in between these two extremes. Perhaps something that looks like a Ford model T, but built extremely light so power requirements are very low. Lots of surface area for solar cells. High wind resistance, but it's only driven at low speeds like an NEV: under 25 mph) where it doesn't matter.

--
"Excellence does not require perfection." -- Henry James
--
Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart-at-earthlink.net

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Discussion Starter #12
1st idea:
Here is another crazy hybrid idea. Get yourself a very light ICE car. Now
add a 2" towing receiver to it. Get yourself a 2" square pipe to stick in
it, doesn't need to be very long at all. The shorter you make it the better
for control of the extra wheels. You will have to cut it with a grinder or
saw it off later on to make it the right length. Now get yourself two 3000
watt hub motors. Having the axles they go with would save you lots of time.
As they could simply be bolted to the 2" tube on both sides. If not, you
will have to fabricate your own system. Top electric speed should be 35mph
at 48v. If you want more speed, then turning up the juice to 60V might be
okay, but wear out brushes faster. I don't think more speed then this could
be attained. Then your top speed would be 40mph.

2nd idea - crazier
To do this cheaper and easier is possible. Okay, this is real crazy. So
crazy that a person would really have to be crazy to even try it, but I bet
it would work. Car has to be front wheel drive. Okay, buy yourself a 10hp
motor. Get your self a 1940's motor generator if your broke.
Now on the left back side of your vehicle you need to cut a round hole for
the shaft of the motor to stick out. Mount the motor in the trunk right over
the back wheel and have it so the the axle of the motor sticks out over the
center of the rear wheel. Note you will be able to see this from the outside
of the vehicle. It will be a crazy hole sticking out. Now attach an
industrial type sprocket the motor. Figure out your gear ratio for say 45mph
top speed. Taking off will use 600 amps, but controllers can put this out.
Now take the wheel off the vehicle, but first measure how much width from
the wheel to the sprocket on the motor. You need to know this so when the
tire is put back on the two sprockets align themselves. To attach the
sprocket to the wheel is a little tricky, but not impossible. If you have a
sprocket that already has holes in it, then center the sprocket on the wheel
and then mark all the wholes with a black marker. Now drill the holes. and
bolt it to the the wheel. You will need to use washers as spacers and then
make sure it is level. The wheel is then put back on the car. If some reason
the wheel doesn't fit on the vehicle level now because of bolt head it will
be necessary to drill another few holes. Now put more bolt heads on back
side of wheel to get the wheel level when bolted back to the car. Now attach
a chain to this and leave it a little lose to compensate for bounce of the
vehicle. Actually, I think the bounce of the vehicle will probably break
something. The motor would have to be attached to the drive suspension
itself and hung in the air, mounted on pipes. So literally the motor would
move up and down inside the vehicle. This would require more holes in the
vehicle. to mount the motor.



jim karlock wrote:
>
> Has anyone done the following conversion (a cheapskate hybrid):
>
> Take a standard car.
> Add electric motor after the transmission.
> Add SMALL battery pack for 10 mile range. No charge, regen, etc. Just
> 10 miles per trip on electric.
> May even live with 30 MPH max: electric on streets & arterials, gas on
> freeway.
> Can switch back an forth to IC by clutch or being in neutral.
> Average USA daily mileage is about 32, so this might be 1/3 of total
> use. 2/3 if charging available at destination.
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> Thanks
> JK
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>
>

--
View this message in context: http://www.nabble.com/Crazy-hybrid-thought-tf4621210s25542.html#a13206780
Sent from the Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list archive at Nabble.com.

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Discussion Starter #13
> 1st idea: very light ICE car... add 2" towing receiver... 2" square pipe
> in it... two 3000 watt hub motors... bolted to the 2" pipe on both sides.

Sounds like something my BEST kids would try. :) Quick and crude; but could be done quickly to test the concept.

There's no suspension for those extra wheels. I'd guess that you would break something the first time you hit a bump.

If I wanted to try something like this, I think I'd add two trailer hitches with 2" balls. Put your wheel and motor on a simple A-frame, centered behind these hitches. Now it is free to move up and down with the suspension.

You could have a cable that lifts this extra wheel off the ground as a crude way to provide a 'clutch'.

> 2nd idea: Car has front wheel drive... 10hp motor... on the left back
> side of vehicle cut a round hole for the shaft of the motor to stick out.
> Mount motor in the trunk so the shaft sticks out the hole... attach
> sprocket to motor... attach sprocket to wheel... Now attach a chain to
> this and leave it a little lose to compensate for bounce of the vehicle.

Again, the idea is sound, but the implementation pretty crude.

Instead, why not cut a hole in the top of the rear wheel well, inside the trunk where it doesn't show? Put a small diameter friction wheel on the motor shaft, roughly 1/5th the diameter of the back wheel. Mount the motor so its weight holds it against the tire, but it is free to move up and down with the suspension travel. You have a big version of the friction drive used on so many electric bicycles.


--
"Excellence does not require perfection." -- Henry James
--
Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart-at-earthlink.net

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Discussion Starter #14
where does one get 3000 watt hub motors???


--- Lee Hart <[email protected]> wrote:

> > 1st idea: very light ICE car... add 2" towing
> receiver... 2" square pipe
> > in it... two 3000 watt hub motors... bolted to the
> 2" pipe on both sides.
>
> Sounds like something my BEST kids would try. :)
> Quick and crude; but could be done quickly to test
> the concept.
>
> There's no suspension for those extra wheels. I'd
> guess that you would break something the first time
> you hit a bump.
>
> If I wanted to try something like this, I think I'd
> add two trailer hitches with 2" balls. Put your
> wheel and motor on a simple A-frame, centered behind
> these hitches. Now it is free to move up and down
> with the suspension.
>
> You could have a cable that lifts this extra wheel
> off the ground as a crude way to provide a 'clutch'.
>
> > 2nd idea: Car has front wheel drive... 10hp
> motor... on the left back
> > side of vehicle cut a round hole for the shaft of
> the motor to stick out.
> > Mount motor in the trunk so the shaft sticks out
> the hole... attach
> > sprocket to motor... attach sprocket to wheel...
> Now attach a chain to
> > this and leave it a little lose to compensate for
> bounce of the vehicle.
>
> Again, the idea is sound, but the implementation
> pretty crude.
>
> Instead, why not cut a hole in the top of the rear
> wheel well, inside the trunk where it doesn't show?
> Put a small diameter friction wheel on the motor
> shaft, roughly 1/5th the diameter of the back wheel.
> Mount the motor so its weight holds it against the
> tire, but it is free to move up and down with the
> suspension travel. You have a big version of the
> friction drive used on so many electric bicycles.
>
>
> --
> "Excellence does not require perfection." -- Henry
> James
> --
> Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377,
> leeahart-at-earthlink.net
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>




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Discussion Starter #15
Both of these ideas will not work because of the vehicle's suspension. The
body rides up and down relative to the rear wheels. The first idea; the hub
motors, would need to move as well. The second idea would also fail because
the chain would have to be variable length, or the motor axle placed at a
pivot point that would maintain the exact same distance from the wheel axle.
Look at how motorcycles do it.

-Phil
----- Original Message -----
From: "ampaynz1" <[email protected]>
To: <[email protected]>
Sent: Monday, October 15, 2007 3:01 PM
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Crazy hybrid thought


>
> 1st idea:
> Here is another crazy hybrid idea. Get yourself a very light ICE car. Now
> add a 2" towing receiver to it. Get yourself a 2" square pipe to stick in
> it, doesn't need to be very long at all. The shorter you make it the
> better
> for control of the extra wheels. You will have to cut it with a grinder or
> saw it off later on to make it the right length. Now get yourself two 3000
> watt hub motors. Having the axles they go with would save you lots of
> time.
> As they could simply be bolted to the 2" tube on both sides. If not, you
> will have to fabricate your own system. Top electric speed should be 35mph
> at 48v. If you want more speed, then turning up the juice to 60V might be
> okay, but wear out brushes faster. I don't think more speed then this
> could
> be attained. Then your top speed would be 40mph.
>
> 2nd idea - crazier
> To do this cheaper and easier is possible. Okay, this is real crazy. So
> crazy that a person would really have to be crazy to even try it, but I
> bet
> it would work. Car has to be front wheel drive. Okay, buy yourself a 10hp
> motor. Get your self a 1940's motor generator if your broke.
> Now on the left back side of your vehicle you need to cut a round hole for
> the shaft of the motor to stick out. Mount the motor in the trunk right
> over
> the back wheel and have it so the the axle of the motor sticks out over
> the
> center of the rear wheel. Note you will be able to see this from the
> outside
> of the vehicle. It will be a crazy hole sticking out. Now attach an
> industrial type sprocket the motor. Figure out your gear ratio for say
> 45mph
> top speed. Taking off will use 600 amps, but controllers can put this out.
> Now take the wheel off the vehicle, but first measure how much width from
> the wheel to the sprocket on the motor. You need to know this so when the
> tire is put back on the two sprockets align themselves. To attach the
> sprocket to the wheel is a little tricky, but not impossible. If you have
> a
> sprocket that already has holes in it, then center the sprocket on the
> wheel
> and then mark all the wholes with a black marker. Now drill the holes. and
> bolt it to the the wheel. You will need to use washers as spacers and then
> make sure it is level. The wheel is then put back on the car. If some
> reason
> the wheel doesn't fit on the vehicle level now because of bolt head it
> will
> be necessary to drill another few holes. Now put more bolt heads on back
> side of wheel to get the wheel level when bolted back to the car. Now
> attach
> a chain to this and leave it a little lose to compensate for bounce of the
> vehicle. Actually, I think the bounce of the vehicle will probably break
> something. The motor would have to be attached to the drive suspension
> itself and hung in the air, mounted on pipes. So literally the motor would
> move up and down inside the vehicle. This would require more holes in the
> vehicle. to mount the motor.
>
>
>
> jim karlock wrote:
>>
>> Has anyone done the following conversion (a cheapskate hybrid):
>>
>> Take a standard car.
>> Add electric motor after the transmission.
>> Add SMALL battery pack for 10 mile range. No charge, regen, etc. Just
>> 10 miles per trip on electric.
>> May even live with 30 MPH max: electric on streets & arterials, gas on
>> freeway.
>> Can switch back an forth to IC by clutch or being in neutral.
>> Average USA daily mileage is about 32, so this might be 1/3 of total
>> use. 2/3 if charging available at destination.
>>
>> Any thoughts?
>>
>> Thanks
>> JK
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> For subscription options, see
>> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>>
>>
>
> --
> View this message in context:
> http://www.nabble.com/Crazy-hybrid-thought-tf4621210s25542.html#a13206780
> Sent from the Electric Vehicle Discussion List mailing list archive at
> Nabble.com.
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>

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Registered
Joined
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70 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
put either of them on a swing arm set up and they
would work as proof of concept anyway...
--- (=A4Phil=A4) <[email protected]> wrote:

> Both of these ideas will not work because of the
> vehicle's suspension. The =

> body rides up and down relative to the rear wheels. =

> The first idea; the hub =

> motors, would need to move as well. The second idea
> would also fail because =

> the chain would have to be variable length, or the
> motor axle placed at a =

> pivot point that would maintain the exact same
> distance from the wheel axle. =

> Look at how motorcycles do it.
> =

> -Phil
> ----- Original Message ----- =

> From: "ampaynz1" <[email protected]>
> To: <[email protected]>
> Sent: Monday, October 15, 2007 3:01 PM
> Subject: Re: [EVDL] Crazy hybrid thought
> =

> =

> >
> > 1st idea:
> > Here is another crazy hybrid idea. Get yourself a
> very light ICE car. Now
> > add a 2" towing receiver to it. Get yourself a 2"
> square pipe to stick in
> > it, doesn't need to be very long at all. The
> shorter you make it the =

> > better
> > for control of the extra wheels. You will have to
> cut it with a grinder or
> > saw it off later on to make it the right length.
> Now get yourself two 3000
> > watt hub motors. Having the axles they go with
> would save you lots of =

> > time.
> > As they could simply be bolted to the 2" tube on
> both sides. If not, you
> > will have to fabricate your own system. Top
> electric speed should be 35mph
> > at 48v. If you want more speed, then turning up
> the juice to 60V might be
> > okay, but wear out brushes faster. I don't think
> more speed then this =

> > could
> > be attained. Then your top speed would be 40mph.
> >
> > 2nd idea - crazier
> > To do this cheaper and easier is possible. Okay,
> this is real crazy. So
> > crazy that a person would really have to be crazy
> to even try it, but I =

> > bet
> > it would work. Car has to be front wheel drive.
> Okay, buy yourself a 10hp
> > motor. Get your self a 1940's motor generator if
> your broke.
> > Now on the left back side of your vehicle you need
> to cut a round hole for
> > the shaft of the motor to stick out. Mount the
> motor in the trunk right =

> > over
> > the back wheel and have it so the the axle of the
> motor sticks out over =

> > the
> > center of the rear wheel. Note you will be able to
> see this from the =

> > outside
> > of the vehicle. It will be a crazy hole sticking
> out. Now attach an
> > industrial type sprocket the motor. Figure out
> your gear ratio for say =

> > 45mph
> > top speed. Taking off will use 600 amps, but
> controllers can put this out.
> > Now take the wheel off the vehicle, but first
> measure how much width from
> > the wheel to the sprocket on the motor. You need
> to know this so when the
> > tire is put back on the two sprockets align
> themselves. To attach the
> > sprocket to the wheel is a little tricky, but not
> impossible. If you have =

> > a
> > sprocket that already has holes in it, then center
> the sprocket on the =

> > wheel
> > and then mark all the wholes with a black marker.
> Now drill the holes. and
> > bolt it to the the wheel. You will need to use
> washers as spacers and then
> > make sure it is level. The wheel is then put back
> on the car. If some =

> > reason
> > the wheel doesn't fit on the vehicle level now
> because of bolt head it =

> > will
> > be necessary to drill another few holes. Now put
> more bolt heads on back
> > side of wheel to get the wheel level when bolted
> back to the car. Now =

> > attach
> > a chain to this and leave it a little lose to
> compensate for bounce of the
> > vehicle. Actually, I think the bounce of the
> vehicle will probably break
> > something. The motor would have to be attached to
> the drive suspension
> > itself and hung in the air, mounted on pipes. So
> literally the motor would
> > move up and down inside the vehicle. This would
> require more holes in the
> > vehicle. to mount the motor.
> >
> >
> >
> > jim karlock wrote:
> >>
> >> Has anyone done the following conversion (a
> cheapskate hybrid):
> >>
> >> Take a standard car.
> >> Add electric motor after the transmission.
> >> Add SMALL battery pack for 10 mile range. No
> charge, regen, etc. Just
> >> 10 miles per trip on electric.
> >> May even live with 30 MPH max: electric on
> streets & arterials, gas on
> >> freeway.
> >> Can switch back an forth to IC by clutch or being
> in neutral.
> >> Average USA daily mileage is about 32, so this
> might be 1/3 of total
> >> use. 2/3 if charging available at destination.
> >>
> >> Any thoughts?
> >>
> >> Thanks
> >> JK
> >>
> >> _______________________________________________
> >> For subscription options, see
> >> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> >>
> >>
> >
> > -- =

> > View this message in context: =

> >
>
http://www.nabble.com/Crazy-hybrid-thought-tf4621210s25542.html#a13206780
> > Sent from the Electric Vehicle Discussion List
> mailing list archive at =

> > Nabble.com.
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > For subscription options, see
> > http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> > =

> =

> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> =




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