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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
Does anyone know how Nichola Tesla managed to tap into the 8Hz of
energy in one of the atmospheric layers, and turn it into current to
drive a car ? ?
>From what I gather his equipment somehow induced a voltage from this
atmospheric source.

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Discussion Starter #2
----- Original Message -----
From: "Grant Clinch" <[email protected]>
To: <[email protected]>
Sent: Friday, August 17, 2007 1:28 PM
Subject: [EVDL] Nichola Tesla


> Hi,
> Does anyone know how Nichola Tesla managed to tap into the 8Hz of
> energy in one of the atmospheric layers, and turn it into current to
> drive a car ? ?
>>From what I gather his equipment somehow induced a voltage from this
> atmospheric source.
>
> Flux Crapaciter? Sorry, couldn't resist!Did he ACTUALLY drive a car with
> broadcasted power? No WONDER they shut him down! Real Quick.

Skepicly

Bob Now IF I could catch and use all the crap on the airwaves to drive
with<g>!?_______________________________________________
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Discussion Starter #3
On 17 Aug 2007 at 14:28, Grant Clinch wrote:

> Does anyone know how Nichola Tesla managed to tap into the 8Hz of
> energy in one of the atmospheric layers, and turn it into current to
> drive a car ?

At the risk of cutting of discussion of a possibly valid subject, I'd like
to urge caution here. Any time I see the name Tesla, my warning beeper goes
off.

Tesla is often cited by the "overunity" and "free energy" crowd. These
topics are strongly discouraged on the EVDL, partly because they cause lots
of heat and very little light. Besides, our focus is on the vehicles, and
not so much on the sources of electrical energy to operate them.

>From http://www.evdl.org/help/index.html#conv

"Avoid posting about perpetual motion machines, overunity devices, and
anything else that appears to violate the laws of physics. There's a pretty
solid consensus on the list that these matters aren't appropriate for it."

Thanks,

David Roden - Akron, Ohio, USA
EVDL Administrator

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Discussion Starter #4
>> Does anyone know how Nichola Tesla managed to tap into the 8Hz of
>> energy in one of the atmospheric layers, and turn it into current to
>> drive a car?

Bob Rice wrote:
> Flux Crapaciter? Sorry, couldn't resist! Did he ACTUALLY drive a car
> with broadcasted power? No WONDER they shut him down! Real Quick.

Tesla was truly a genius, with many brilliant inventions to his credit.
But he lived at a time when people routinely stole ideas. Unless you
were rich and well-connected, you had little chance for compensation.

He was also rather secretive and enigmatic by nature. So, it was only
natural for him to explain as little as possible about how his
inventions worked, for fear that they would be stolen. His descriptions
to reporters were often deliberately misleading.

He really did run a car on broadcast power as a demonstration project.
However, the "trick" was that it only ran on a specially prepared
stretch of road, where he had constructed large loop antennas on each
side using the fence wire and overhead power lines. This power was
inductively coupled into a smaller loop antenna in the car itself.

This probably formed a low-power battery charger. The car itself had
what he called capacitors (which were probably batteries) that got
charged by the inductively coupled charger, so he could then drive at
good speed for a short distance.

There are full-size working versions of this system in use today. Disney
World has a "people mover" train that has passive cars with half of an
electric motor in the car, and the other half in the center of the
roadway underneath, somewhat like a center rail.

Inductran has been selling inductively coupled chargers for many years.
Factories and warehouses bury them in the floor at strategic locations.
Forklifts, personnel carriers, or material handling equipment can run
around on batteries, and get recharged every time they park on top of
one of these "hot spots".

So, the idea works... but is expensive to set up. It is the most
practical when you have a short dedicated route, with either low power
demands or frequent stops for recharging.
--
Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget the perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
--
Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart_at_earthlink.net

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah, he didn't. It's all internet myth. Nobody has ever produced any
documentation from that era that claims he did.
They always claim that the only documents were a newspaper article that
was destroyed in a library fire, or some similar nonsense.

> Hi,
> Does anyone know how Nichola Tesla managed to tap into the 8Hz of
> energy in one of the atmospheric layers, and turn it into current to
> drive a car ? ?
>>From what I gather his equipment somehow induced a voltage from this
> atmospheric source.
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>


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If you send email to me, or the EVDL, that has > 4 lines of legalistic
junk at the end; then you are specifically authorizing me to do whatever I
wish with the message. By posting the message you agree that your long
legalistic signature is void.

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Discussion Starter #6
The wireless electric car story was said to be Peter Savo (supposed to
be Tesla's nephew) recounting his 1931 meeting with Tesla to Derek Ahers
who did the writing down, but he did this telling in 1967, long after
Tesla's era. No other records of anything like this electric car
science exists outside the story at all, much less anything that might
date to 1931. Tesla worked with wireless radio power, not magical
"ether power" as claimed in the story. Nor would his high powered radio
transmitters (fairly well understood today) be capable of anything even
close to the performance described, and the EM would have cooked the
occupants as well as a huge radius of countryside if such a power level
were ever achieved.

And to top it off, Tesla's family tree is well documented and Tesla has
no nephew named Peter Savo. The identity of both Savo and the writer
Derek Ahers is not known- where are they from, what did they do for a
living, who are their parents. They are unknown persons outside the
story.

It is reasonable to conclude the whole story is simply a fabricated
fantasy. It would not be the first time.

Anyhow, it's OT for the list to debate whether it's valid or not. I'm done.

Danny

Peter VanDerWal wrote:

>Yeah, he didn't. It's all internet myth. Nobody has ever produced any
>documentation from that era that claims he did.
>They always claim that the only documents were a newspaper article that
>was destroyed in a library fire, or some similar nonsense.
>
>
>
>>Hi,
>>Does anyone know how Nichola Tesla managed to tap into the 8Hz of
>>energy in one of the atmospheric layers, and turn it into current to
>>drive a car ? ?
>>>From what I gather his equipment somehow induced a voltage from this
>>atmospheric source.
>>
>>_______________________________________________
>>For subscription options, see
>>http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
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>>
>>
>
>
>
>

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Discussion Starter #9
i have been reading tons of emails on tesla's car provided
by GM and in which he replaced the engine with a motor

lee's simple logical explanation is by far one of the most
sensible and nice that i have come across

very nice

..peekay


----- Original Message -----
From: "Lee Hart" <[email protected]>
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <[email protected]>
Sent: Friday, August 17, 2007 11:45 PM
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Nichola Tesla


> >> Does anyone know how Nichola Tesla managed to tap into the 8Hz of
> >> energy in one of the atmospheric layers, and turn it into current to
> >> drive a car?
>
> Bob Rice wrote:
> > Flux Crapaciter? Sorry, couldn't resist! Did he ACTUALLY drive a car
> > with broadcasted power? No WONDER they shut him down! Real Quick.
>
> Tesla was truly a genius, with many brilliant inventions to his credit.
> But he lived at a time when people routinely stole ideas. Unless you
> were rich and well-connected, you had little chance for compensation.
>
> He was also rather secretive and enigmatic by nature. So, it was only
> natural for him to explain as little as possible about how his
> inventions worked, for fear that they would be stolen. His descriptions
> to reporters were often deliberately misleading.
>
> He really did run a car on broadcast power as a demonstration project.
> However, the "trick" was that it only ran on a specially prepared
> stretch of road, where he had constructed large loop antennas on each
> side using the fence wire and overhead power lines. This power was
> inductively coupled into a smaller loop antenna in the car itself.
>
> This probably formed a low-power battery charger. The car itself had
> what he called capacitors (which were probably batteries) that got
> charged by the inductively coupled charger, so he could then drive at
> good speed for a short distance.
>
> There are full-size working versions of this system in use today. Disney
> World has a "people mover" train that has passive cars with half of an
> electric motor in the car, and the other half in the center of the
> roadway underneath, somewhat like a center rail.
>
> Inductran has been selling inductively coupled chargers for many years.
> Factories and warehouses bury them in the floor at strategic locations.
> Forklifts, personnel carriers, or material handling equipment can run
> around on batteries, and get recharged every time they park on top of
> one of these "hot spots".
>
> So, the idea works... but is expensive to set up. It is the most
> practical when you have a short dedicated route, with either low power
> demands or frequent stops for recharging.
> --
> Ring the bells that still can ring
> Forget the perfect offering
> There is a crack in everything
> That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
> --
> Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart_at_earthlink.net
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>
>
> --
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> Version: 7.5.476 / Virus Database: 269.11.15/949 - Release Date: 8/12/2007
11:03 AM
>
>

_______________________________________________
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Discussion Starter #10
How about we build a drag strip with something like
this..could it work lee???

--- Lee Hart <[email protected]> wrote:

> >> Does anyone know how Nichola Tesla managed to tap
> into the 8Hz of
> >> energy in one of the atmospheric layers, and turn
> it into current to
> >> drive a car?
>
> Bob Rice wrote:
> > Flux Crapaciter? Sorry, couldn't resist! Did he
> ACTUALLY drive a car
> > with broadcasted power? No WONDER they shut him
> down! Real Quick.
>
> Tesla was truly a genius, with many brilliant
> inventions to his credit.
> But he lived at a time when people routinely stole
> ideas. Unless you
> were rich and well-connected, you had little chance
> for compensation.
>
> He was also rather secretive and enigmatic by
> nature. So, it was only
> natural for him to explain as little as possible
> about how his
> inventions worked, for fear that they would be
> stolen. His descriptions
> to reporters were often deliberately misleading.
>
> He really did run a car on broadcast power as a
> demonstration project.
> However, the "trick" was that it only ran on a
> specially prepared
> stretch of road, where he had constructed large loop
> antennas on each
> side using the fence wire and overhead power lines.
> This power was
> inductively coupled into a smaller loop antenna in
> the car itself.
>
> This probably formed a low-power battery charger.
> The car itself had
> what he called capacitors (which were probably
> batteries) that got
> charged by the inductively coupled charger, so he
> could then drive at
> good speed for a short distance.
>
> There are full-size working versions of this system
> in use today. Disney
> World has a "people mover" train that has passive
> cars with half of an
> electric motor in the car, and the other half in the
> center of the
> roadway underneath, somewhat like a center rail.
>
> Inductran has been selling inductively coupled
> chargers for many years.
> Factories and warehouses bury them in the floor at
> strategic locations.
> Forklifts, personnel carriers, or material handling
> equipment can run
> around on batteries, and get recharged every time
> they park on top of
> one of these "hot spots".
>
> So, the idea works... but is expensive to set up. It
> is the most
> practical when you have a short dedicated route,
> with either low power
> demands or frequent stops for recharging.
> --
> Ring the bells that still can ring
> Forget the perfect offering
> There is a crack in everything
> That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
> --
> Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377,
> leeahart_at_earthlink.net
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>




____________________________________________________________________________________
Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
http://searchmarketing.yahoo.com/

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Discussion Starter #11
Wouldn't that just be a rail gun with a seat for a projectile?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railgun

What would be the point, it wouldn't be racing as we know it with the energy
not being stored in the car. You could also build a drag strip with a steam
catapult modeled after an aircraft carreir catapult, but that also would be
a different sport.

----- Original Message -----
From: "keith vansickle" <[email protected]>
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <[email protected]>
Sent: Monday, August 20, 2007 11:37 AM
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Nichola Tesla


> How about we build a drag strip with something like
> this..could it work lee???
>
> --- Lee Hart <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> >> Does anyone know how Nichola Tesla managed to tap
>> into the 8Hz of
>> >> energy in one of the atmospheric layers, and turn
>> it into current to
>> >> drive a car?
>>
>> Bob Rice wrote:
>> > Flux Crapaciter? Sorry, couldn't resist! Did he
>> ACTUALLY drive a car
>> > with broadcasted power? No WONDER they shut him
>> down! Real Quick.
>>
>> Tesla was truly a genius, with many brilliant
>> inventions to his credit.
>> But he lived at a time when people routinely stole
>> ideas. Unless you
>> were rich and well-connected, you had little chance
>> for compensation.
>>
>> He was also rather secretive and enigmatic by
>> nature. So, it was only
>> natural for him to explain as little as possible
>> about how his
>> inventions worked, for fear that they would be
>> stolen. His descriptions
>> to reporters were often deliberately misleading.
>>
>> He really did run a car on broadcast power as a
>> demonstration project.
>> However, the "trick" was that it only ran on a
>> specially prepared
>> stretch of road, where he had constructed large loop
>> antennas on each
>> side using the fence wire and overhead power lines.
>> This power was
>> inductively coupled into a smaller loop antenna in
>> the car itself.
>>
>> This probably formed a low-power battery charger.
>> The car itself had
>> what he called capacitors (which were probably
>> batteries) that got
>> charged by the inductively coupled charger, so he
>> could then drive at
>> good speed for a short distance.
>>
>> There are full-size working versions of this system
>> in use today. Disney
>> World has a "people mover" train that has passive
>> cars with half of an
>> electric motor in the car, and the other half in the
>> center of the
>> roadway underneath, somewhat like a center rail.
>>
>> Inductran has been selling inductively coupled
>> chargers for many years.
>> Factories and warehouses bury them in the floor at
>> strategic locations.
>> Forklifts, personnel carriers, or material handling
>> equipment can run
>> around on batteries, and get recharged every time
>> they park on top of
>> one of these "hot spots".
>>
>> So, the idea works... but is expensive to set up. It
>> is the most
>> practical when you have a short dedicated route,
>> with either low power
>> demands or frequent stops for recharging.
>> --
>> Ring the bells that still can ring
>> Forget the perfect offering
>> There is a crack in everything
>> That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
>> --
>> Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377,
>> leeahart_at_earthlink.net
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> For subscription options, see
>> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>>
>
>
>
>
> ____________________________________________________________________________________
> Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
> http://searchmarketing.yahoo.com/
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>
>


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Discussion Starter #12
Not that I really want to get into it here, but do you have a source on
this??

I'm familiar with Tesla's work but have never heard of an inductively
coupled car demonstration. It's technically possible but the track
would have had to be made of a truly phenomenal amount of inductors and
copper. This type of coupling is almost impossible with a free-running
vehicle because the air gap needs to be low, requiring such tight
tolerances in the ride height that generally requires the vehicle to be
on rails. Running, even charging, an electric car requires immense
power levels. While Tesla was a remarkable inventor, I don't see how
antennas on the fence coupling power to the car's antenna would be
possible. The required air gap would be in inches at most.

Also relevant I've not known Tesla to have worked in the area of
low-freq inductive coupling, at least not any serious work. His
"wireless power" was broadcasting immense radio-freq power levels with
Tesla coils. High freq could broadcast power from one antenna to
another but it's not going to power a car, even a few feet apart the
received power is a VERY small percentage of the transmitted power.
Sending a few KW to a nearby car receiver would probably require more
power than the grid was capable of at the time, the transmitters would
have to be on a scale never seen before even in Tesla's work, and the RF
levels in the air would be enough to kill anyone in the area.

Low freq inductive coupling may seem similar, but in fact it's totally
different technology.

Danny

> > He really did run a car on broadcast power as a
> > demonstration project.
> > However, the "trick" was that it only ran on a
> > specially prepared
> > stretch of road, where he had constructed large loop
> > antennas on each
> > side using the fence wire and overhead power lines.
> > This power was
> > inductively coupled into a smaller loop antenna in
> > the car itself.
> >
> > This probably formed a low-power battery charger.
> > The car itself had
> > what he called capacitors (which were probably
> > batteries) that got
> > charged by the inductively coupled charger, so he
> > could then drive at
> > good speed for a short distance.
> > Leonard Cohen
> > --
> > Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377,
> > leeahart_at_earthlink.net
> >

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Discussion Starter #13
Here's another idea...though probably not technically feasable at this
time.
Kids' tracks have spinning wheels that 'boost' little matchbox/hot wheels
cars up to speed, where they whiz around, until they reach the spinning
wheels again, only to get another boost.

Electric vehicles (assuming high efficiency) could be recharged in like
manner.
Various, strategic, high-power 'hotspots' could be placed at toll booths,
etc, where you not only would be recharged, but would automatically be
'charged' road-use fees (including recharge fees).

Your vehicle drives over, through the hot-spot, getting a high-power
'boost' whereupon the vehicle is then hopefully able to run for quite a
while on the energy received, until it reaches the next toll
booth/hotspot.

Of course, the 'gas station lobbyists' would have a fit, if our vehicles
(and passengers) didn't have to stop for periodic 'refreshments'....

Since a number of states are selling their toll roads to private companies
(and the private company is presumably using the money to maintain the
road) - perhaps those lobbyists would equally fight 'for' this kind of
refueling?

Then again, anyone having a laptop in their car, driving through a
hotspot... might lose all data?


Ed Cooley





keith vansickle <[email protected]>
Sent by: [email protected]
08/20/2007 12:37
Please respond to
Electric Vehicle Discussion List <[email protected]>


To
Electric Vehicle Discussion List <[email protected]>
cc

Subject
Re: [EVDL] Nichola Tesla






How about we build a drag strip with something like
this..could it work lee???

--- Lee Hart <[email protected]> wrote:

> >> Does anyone know how Nichola Tesla managed to tap
> into the 8Hz of
> >> energy in one of the atmospheric layers, and turn
> it into current to
> >> drive a car?
>
> Bob Rice wrote:
> > Flux Crapaciter? Sorry, couldn't resist! Did he
> ACTUALLY drive a car
> > with broadcasted power? No WONDER they shut him
> down! Real Quick.
>
> Tesla was truly a genius, with many brilliant
> inventions to his credit.
> But he lived at a time when people routinely stole
> ideas. Unless you
> were rich and well-connected, you had little chance
> for compensation.
>
> He was also rather secretive and enigmatic by
> nature. So, it was only
> natural for him to explain as little as possible
> about how his
> inventions worked, for fear that they would be
> stolen. His descriptions
> to reporters were often deliberately misleading.
>
> He really did run a car on broadcast power as a
> demonstration project.
> However, the "trick" was that it only ran on a
> specially prepared
> stretch of road, where he had constructed large loop
> antennas on each
> side using the fence wire and overhead power lines.
> This power was
> inductively coupled into a smaller loop antenna in
> the car itself.
>
> This probably formed a low-power battery charger.
> The car itself had
> what he called capacitors (which were probably
> batteries) that got
> charged by the inductively coupled charger, so he
> could then drive at
> good speed for a short distance.
>
> There are full-size working versions of this system
> in use today. Disney
> World has a "people mover" train that has passive
> cars with half of an
> electric motor in the car, and the other half in the
> center of the
> roadway underneath, somewhat like a center rail.
>
> Inductran has been selling inductively coupled
> chargers for many years.
> Factories and warehouses bury them in the floor at
> strategic locations.
> Forklifts, personnel carriers, or material handling
> equipment can run
> around on batteries, and get recharged every time
> they park on top of
> one of these "hot spots".
>
> So, the idea works... but is expensive to set up. It
> is the most
> practical when you have a short dedicated route,
> with either low power
> demands or frequent stops for recharging.
> --
> Ring the bells that still can ring
> Forget the perfect offering
> There is a crack in everything
> That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
> --
> Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377,
> leeahart_at_earthlink.net
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>




____________________________________________________________________________________
Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
http://searchmarketing.yahoo.com/

_______________________________________________
For subscription options, see
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Discussion Starter #14
[email protected] wrote:
> Not that I really want to get into it here, but do you have a source
> on this?

No authoritative source I can quote directly. I'm just summarizing a
number of different articles I've read, and adding my own guesses.

> I'm familiar with Tesla's work but have never heard of an inductively
> coupled car demonstration.

He hinted at it in several of his own writings and patents; these can
probably be found with a little digging. There are also various
reporter's and observer's accounts, hearsay, and other indirect
information. It was common enough for Tesla to hint at great things he
was working on and show people half-finished or somewhat rigged
demonstrations.

> It's technically possible but the track would have had to be made
> of a truly phenomenal amount of inductors and copper. This type of
> coupling is almost impossible with a free-running vehicle because the
> air gap needs to be low

I agree. It isn't practical to get any significant amount of power
across a large gap. This is why I believe he had batteries in the car,
and was only charging them (and probably at a low rate).

> While Tesla was a remarkable inventor, I don't see how antennas on
> the fence coupling power to the car's antenna would be possible.
> The required air gap would be in inches at most.

The situation is difficult, but not *that* difficult. If your
transmitting loop is (say) 20 feet high x 1000 feet long, and your car
loop is (say) 5 feet high x 20 feet long, and 8 feet away, the coupling
coefficient is around 1 percent. Putting 10 KW into the transmitting
loop could give you a hundred watts in the vehicle; 36v at 2.5 amps for
example. Not enough to drive, but enough to slowly recharge. between
demonstrations.

> His "wireless power" was broadcasting immense radio-freq power levels
> with Tesla coils. High freq could broadcast power from one antenna to
> another but it's not going to power a car, even a few feet apart

Yes; he certainly would have used high frequency AC; the highest he
could manage.

> RF levels in the air would be enough to kill anyone in the area.

No; people make lousy receiving antenna. You'd be amazed at the power
levels that people can walk around in and be totally oblivious to its
presence.

> Low freq inductive coupling may seem similar, but in fact it's totally
> different technology.

Yes, but I don't think he was using simple inductive coupling. The two
loops function as antennas, complete with resonating capacitors for the
frequency of operation.

Try building yourself a couple of small loop antennas. I think you will
be surprised at how much power can in fact be transmitted.
--
"Never doubt that the work of a small group of thoughtful, committed
citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever
has!" -- Margaret Mead
--
Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart_at_earthlink.net


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Discussion Starter #15
keith vansickle wrote:
> How about we build a drag strip with something like this...
> could it work?

It could work; but just as Tesla found, broadcasting power is very
inefficient. You'd be doing well to receive even 10% of the power you
sent. Getting 100kw to the dragsters would require a 1 megawatt power
plant!

The closer you can get the sending and receiving antennas, the better
the performance. All practical systems of this sort depend on very close
spacing; like the coils in the road and the coils in the car being only
fractions of an inch apart.

I doubt that Tesla could have broadcast enough power to run his car
directly, given the considerable distance between his antennas. I think
it is far more likely that the broadcast power only ran his battery
charger. He charged the batteries slowly, and then ran them down quickly
to make the car go for a minute or two. Then he'd have to wait a
significant time before it had recharged sufficiently to do it again.

You could set up something equivalent to a slot car, where the cars run
over a guide track that also has the coupled coils. But if you're going
to do that, you might as well make it an electric train, with two rails
carrying power as well as guidance to the wheels.
--
"Never doubt that the work of a small group of thoughtful, committed
citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever
has!" -- Margaret Mead
--
Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart_at_earthlink.net


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Discussion Starter #16
Well what about an inverted trolly set up where the
lines carring the power were stuck to the drag strip
and the connection was a swing arm but the vehicle was
still driven--like a slot car but with no slot--just
ideas to get power to the motor with having to lug all
those batteries down the strip. after all the big
guys in drag racing use nitro for power and destroy an
engine every 30 sec of run time if we are to compete
we have to have something like this.

--- Lee Hart <[email protected]> wrote:

> keith vansickle wrote:
> > How about we build a drag strip with something
> like this...
> > could it work?
>
> It could work; but just as Tesla found, broadcasting
> power is very
> inefficient. You'd be doing well to receive even 10%
> of the power you
> sent. Getting 100kw to the dragsters would require a
> 1 megawatt power
> plant!
>
> The closer you can get the sending and receiving
> antennas, the better
> the performance. All practical systems of this sort
> depend on very close
> spacing; like the coils in the road and the coils in
> the car being only
> fractions of an inch apart.
>
> I doubt that Tesla could have broadcast enough power
> to run his car
> directly, given the considerable distance between
> his antennas. I think
> it is far more likely that the broadcast power only
> ran his battery
> charger. He charged the batteries slowly, and then
> ran them down quickly
> to make the car go for a minute or two. Then he'd
> have to wait a
> significant time before it had recharged
> sufficiently to do it again.
>
> You could set up something equivalent to a slot car,
> where the cars run
> over a guide track that also has the coupled coils.
> But if you're going
> to do that, you might as well make it an electric
> train, with two rails
> carrying power as well as guidance to the wheels.
> --
> "Never doubt that the work of a small group of
> thoughtful, committed
> citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only
> thing that ever
> has!" -- Margaret Mead
> --
> Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377,
> leeahart_at_earthlink.net
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>



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70 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I seen this done as a demostration on drag strip back either in the 60's or
70's. They had about 3 inch copper tubing set on wood frame work that was
on both sides of the car that ran the 1/4 mile. There was a trolley type
spring loaded trolley pick up arms that rode on these pipes.

There was a large 3 phase 120/208 125 kw generator that was on wheels that
supply the power to these copper busses.

I do not remember what motor it was, but it look like one for aircraft
starting like the one we use which was rated at 80 hp at 230/460 vac 60 hz.

This run was done after the Green Monster had it first run.

Roland




----- Original Message -----
From: "keith vansickle" <[email protected]>
To: <[email protected]>; "Electric Vehicle Discussion List"
<[email protected]>
Sent: Tuesday, August 21, 2007 1:45 PM
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Nichola Tesla


> Well what about an inverted trolly set up where the
> lines carring the power were stuck to the drag strip
> and the connection was a swing arm but the vehicle was
> still driven--like a slot car but with no slot--just
> ideas to get power to the motor with having to lug all
> those batteries down the strip. after all the big
> guys in drag racing use nitro for power and destroy an
> engine every 30 sec of run time if we are to compete
> we have to have something like this.
>
> --- Lee Hart <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > keith vansickle wrote:
> > > How about we build a drag strip with something
> > like this...
> > > could it work?
> >
> > It could work; but just as Tesla found, broadcasting
> > power is very
> > inefficient. You'd be doing well to receive even 10%
> > of the power you
> > sent. Getting 100kw to the dragsters would require a
> > 1 megawatt power
> > plant!
> >
> > The closer you can get the sending and receiving
> > antennas, the better
> > the performance. All practical systems of this sort
> > depend on very close
> > spacing; like the coils in the road and the coils in
> > the car being only
> > fractions of an inch apart.
> >
> > I doubt that Tesla could have broadcast enough power
> > to run his car
> > directly, given the considerable distance between
> > his antennas. I think
> > it is far more likely that the broadcast power only
> > ran his battery
> > charger. He charged the batteries slowly, and then
> > ran them down quickly
> > to make the car go for a minute or two. Then he'd
> > have to wait a
> > significant time before it had recharged
> > sufficiently to do it again.
> >
> > You could set up something equivalent to a slot car,
> > where the cars run
> > over a guide track that also has the coupled coils.
> > But if you're going
> > to do that, you might as well make it an electric
> > train, with two rails
> > carrying power as well as guidance to the wheels.
> > --
> > "Never doubt that the work of a small group of
> > thoughtful, committed
> > citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only
> > thing that ever
> > has!" -- Margaret Mead
> > --
> > Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377,
> > leeahart_at_earthlink.net
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > For subscription options, see
> > http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> >
>
>
>
>
> ____________________________________________________________________________________
> Shape Yahoo! in your own image. Join our Network Research Panel today!
> http://surveylink.yahoo.com/gmrs/yahoo_panel_invite.asp?a=7
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>

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